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Audio Format

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

Hello,

 

Basically I'm looking for the best audio format at low bitrates (~96kbps). I need these to store my music collection on a portable player.

So far I've been using ogg and I might need to go to q2 to satisfy the space requirements. I've read on the internet about opus and he-aac. I'm not sure how he-aac is supposed to be low on space usage (is it?) because it's 3 times the size of an ogg. The opus however is working fine. My question is if there's any consensus as to which is better?

Also what is some good software to convert a whole music library through some gui? ( using opus, I already have one for ogg)

And are there other file formats worth considering for the job?

 

I'll be using a Nexus 4 as a DAP ( hence the space requirement ) and some under 50$ IEM's as earphones

post #2 of 7

http://listening-tests.hydrogenaudio.org/igorc/results.html

 

Opus > HE-AAC > Vorbis

 

but I consistently preferred HE-AAC in that test. IIRC it had less pre-ringing. But this test was run when Opus was still called CELT, version 0.11.2. They surely have improved the codec since then.

post #3 of 7

Do note that a proper HE-AAC encoder has parameters regarding quality (or bitrate). If it's turning out 3x the size, you're using the wrong setting.

 

I haven't tried it myself at those bitrates, so I'm not sure, but more recent Opus encoders are probably the best. But also keep in mind that a lot of playback software do not support Opus yet, while AAC support is fairly common.

post #4 of 7

A lot of work is still going into Opus as shown here, so I wouldn't be surprised if it sounded quite a bit better than when the test was conducted.

 

Yeah mikeaj is right, check the codecs/settings from the test I linked above: iTunes AAC for example was set to: 48 kbps, CBR (resulted in an average of 71 kbps!)


Edited by xnor - 8/31/13 at 4:34pm
post #5 of 7
Thread Starter 

Read a bit more on it after I posted. I got another encoder and aac converted properly as well but I decided to go with Opus in the end for the same reasons you stated above. It's converting everything atm so probably tommorow I'll have a listen. I went with 64kpbs Opus it sounded decent on the tests I made and I wanted to be sure that it'll fit and it seems that Neutron player for Android can play back Opus files so I guess I'll be using that.

Thanks for the answers and I'm always open to other suggestions if there's any.

 

Oh and for everybody out there that's reading this and still encoding to mp3 or low bitrate ogg and needs a bit more space give either opus or aac a try and ABX them you might be surprised by the results using your portable setup :)

post #6 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mi3zu View Post

Hello,

 

Basically I'm looking for the best audio format at low bitrates (~96kbps). I need these to store my music collection on a portable player.

So far I've been using ogg and I might need to go to q2 to satisfy the space requirements. I've read on the internet about opus and he-aac. I'm not sure how he-aac is supposed to be low on space usage (is it?) because it's 3 times the size of an ogg. The opus however is working fine. My question is if there's any consensus as to which is better?

Also what is some good software to convert a whole music library through some gui? ( using opus, I already have one for ogg)

And are there other file formats worth considering for the job?

 

I'll be using a Nexus 4 as a DAP ( hence the space requirement ) and some under 50$ IEM's as earphones

 

What will your player support?  I don't know much about Ogg, but I do like iTunes AAC for lossy compression.

post #7 of 7

Sort of tangential to the discussion but an interesting history.

 

The MP3: A History Of Innovation And Betrayal

http://www.npr.org/blogs/therecord/2011/03/23/134622940/the-mp3-a-history-of-innovation-and-betrayal

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