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The Stax Thread III - Page 42

post #616 of 3374

The nosie in the headphones is a common problem with electrostatic headphones.  Overtime, the dust or moisture could evetually find their way into the driver.  Fixing this problem isn't that easy, unfortunately.

 

You never, ever want to clean the diaphragm with alcohol or acetone.  If you do that you'll wipe out the coating material on the diaphragm.  You'll end up destroying it.

 

Try to clean the stators as best as you can.  If you see some dust on the diaphragm, you can try blowing it off or use a small brush to gently wipe it off. 

 

Good luck.

 

Wachara C.

post #617 of 3374
Quote:
Originally Posted by chinsettawong View Post
 

The nosie in the headphones is a common problem with electrostatic headphones.  Overtime, the dust or moisture could evetually find their way into the driver.  Fixing this problem isn't that easy, unfortunately.

 

You never, ever want to clean the diaphragm with alcohol or acetone.  If you do that you'll wipe out the coating material on the diaphragm.  You'll end up destroying it.

 

Try to clean the stators as best as you can.  If you see some dust on the diaphragm, you can try blowing it off or use a small brush to gently wipe it off. 

 

Good luck.

 

Wachara C.

 

too bad too bad! I thought that it is some desision of this problem. May be exists some liquids for STAX's diaphragm?

Or where could buy repaire diaphragm?

post #618 of 3374

If Stax just could make some earspeakers WITHOUT such damn issues. I am having a problem myself..

post #619 of 3374
Quote:
Originally Posted by bbest View Post
 

 

too bad too bad! I thought that it is some desision of this problem. May be exists some liquids for STAX's diaphragm?

Or where could buy repaire diaphragm?

 

I'm not sure what you want to do.  Have you already cleaned the diaphragm using alcohol or acetone? 

 

Recoating the diaphragm isn't difficult at all.  But you need to know what you're doing.

 

Please have a look at my thread:  http://www.head-fi.org/t/498292/my-diy-electrostatic-headphones 

 

I'm sure you can learn a lot from there.  ;)

 

Wachara C.

post #620 of 3374
Quote:
Originally Posted by davidsh View Post
 

If Stax just could make some earspeakers WITHOUT such damn issues. I am having a problem myself..

 

There are a lot of Stax headphones that don't have this issue at all and have been working perfectly for many decades.  ;)

 

The most important thing is that you need to really take good care of  the dust cover.  If you happen to pinch even a tiny hole on it, the moisture and dust can eventually go in and cause all kinds of problem.

 

Wachara C.

post #621 of 3374

^Ohh gawd, really need to do something to my lambda sig's. Bought them second hand and there are substantial holes in the dust cover on 1 diaphragm. On the other, there's already problems with imbalance and probably dust in the driver.

post #622 of 3374

You can buy small cans of compressed air with a nozzle attached for blowing out dust from electrical equipment etc like laptops. keyboards.

Might be worth a try. 

Maybe need to neutralise any static charge first as well which might be attracting the dust

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by chinsettawong View Post
 

The nosie in the headphones is a common problem with electrostatic headphones.  Overtime, the dust or moisture could evetually find their way into the driver.  Fixing this problem isn't that easy, unfortunately.

 

You never, ever want to clean the diaphragm with alcohol or acetone.  If you do that you'll wipe out the coating material on the diaphragm.  You'll end up destroying it.

 

Try to clean the stators as best as you can.  If you see some dust on the diaphragm, you can try blowing it off or use a small brush to gently wipe it off. 

 

Good luck.

 

Wachara C.

post #623 of 3374
Quote:
Originally Posted by complin View Post

You can buy small cans of compressed air with a nozzle attached for blowing out dust from electrical equipment etc like laptops. keyboards.

Might be worth a try. 

Maybe need to neutralise any static charge first as well which might be attracting the dust

 

I'm thinking this will damage the drivers.

post #624 of 3374
What's fair market value for the SR-Omega these days (original drivers, mint condition)?

Is there anything I should be weary of in caring for them? Curious as to why they have some history of driver failure.

Yes, I am now the owner of a SR-Omega (with nothing to drive them but a SRM-323S and SRM-T1S redface.gif).
Edited by 3X0 - 10/21/13 at 3:08am
post #625 of 3374
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3X0 View Post

What's fair market value for the SR-Omega these days (original drivers, mint condition)?

Is there anything I should be weary of in caring for them? Curious as to why they have some history of driver failure.

Yes, I am now the owner of a SR-Omega (with nothing to drive them but a SRM-323S and SRM-T1S redface.gif).

 

This question has been asked a few times. Judging from some of my PM's I've had with other Omega owners and certain experienced users, the price is set out to be around $3400-4200, I got mine for $3500 earlier this year after Euro to Aud conversion, sold them for the same amount. Anything over $3800 expect it to be near flawless and anything over $4000 expect it to be absolutely NOS, otherwise you're dealing with a flipper.

 

Some Omega's have O2 drivers but the seller should note this if it has been replaced, which is what Stax will do should your O1 drivers break down, they replace it with the latest MK2 drivers.

 

I found the O1's to be pretty good even off the T1S I tried, but it was better off a diy BH (not nattonrice's).

 

Btw what happened to your borked HE60?

post #626 of 3374
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3X0 View Post

What's fair market value for the SR-Omega these days (original drivers, mint condition)?

Is there anything I should be weary of in caring for them? Curious as to why they have some history of driver failure.

Yes, I am now the owner of a SR-Omega (with nothing to drive them but a SRM-323S and SRM-T1S redface.gif).

 

You should try searching yahoo.jp auctions. Price is around 2500$ USD there for a decent set. Secondhand on head-fi is 3500$ + (without box), 4000+ with box and in decent condition.

Should look for later serials since the drivers are prone to failure.

post #627 of 3374
Not many cheap Omegas sell for that amount even on YJ?
post #628 of 3374
Thanks for the intel. Does anyone know why SR-Omega drivers are so prone to failure? Is there some preventive maintenance that can be done?

I'll be selling my HE60/HEV70 soon completely as-is. Never got the opportunity to get them checked out by Moon-Audio or Sennheiser.
post #629 of 3374
Quote:
Originally Posted by chinsettawong View Post
 

 

I'm not sure what you want to do.  Have you already cleaned the diaphragm using alcohol or acetone? 

 

No - I don't clean diaphragm with alcohol yet. Just only suggested to do it.

 

Thanks for suggesting of useful thread  


Edited by bbest - 10/21/13 at 5:15am
post #630 of 3374
Quote:
Originally Posted by complin View Post
 

You can buy small cans of compressed air with a nozzle attached for blowing out dust from electrical equipment etc like laptops. keyboards.

Might be worth a try. 

Maybe need to neutralise any static charge first as well which might be attracting the dust

 

 

That would be a very bad idea. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by 3X0 View Post

Thanks for the intel. Does anyone know why SR-Omega drivers are so prone to failure? Is there some preventive maintenance that can be done?

I'll be selling my HE60/HEV70 soon completely as-is. Never got the opportunity to get them checked out by Moon-Audio or Sennheiser.

 

The SR-Omega design is just very fragile in general.  Nothing can be done preemptively though. 

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