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Do audiophiles "like" music? - Page 20  

post #286 of 345

This is why i'll always consider myself a music lover instead of an audiophile.

post #287 of 345
We're all victims of marketing including the author of this post. The difference between one set of gear to another is not enough to justify the attention we pay to it and that applies to me too. In terms of the music, that can be listened to online or on the radio.
You don't have to obsessively covet the recording either. But the shiny plastic case looks very nice in the cd rack doesn't it?
post #288 of 345
My friend is a real audiophil. (50k euro) ???
He never ever would do this test to check if he has golden ears
https://www.goldenears.philips.com

Why, maybe he will see afterwards that it is wasted money for his ears?

He is absolutely sure to hear the difference between flac and wav.

My greatest problem in the test was to hear the difference in the mp3 artifacts.
Finally, i did 100%, but he will never do the test - is this audiophil?
post #289 of 345

Wow. My mind has been bent.

 

I remember just liking the music. Since car audio faze (hearing a SOLO X 18"), I've just been chasing BASS. Clean, crisp, tight bass. And slowly, it's become more about the BASS.

 

I am causing severe damage to my ears through the purchase of amps for BASS. Then I go wow, that was good BASS, turn vol up, BASS distorts, and I do everything to make it tight again (at a higher volume). The odd moments (after learning about tubes) was enjoying vocals/ essence of proper soundstage (Jewel).

 

Feel the BASS BASS BASS My brain HURTS! I wish I never found this forum :P I used to be happy with $30 headphones. REALLY HAPPY

post #290 of 345
Quote:
Originally Posted by dosprompt View Post

 

BONUS QUESTION - Is there one album that you would willingly sacrifice your entire system for if the alternative was never listening to that album again?  If so what is it?

Of course. Glenn Gould's recording of the Die Kunst der Fuge on the piano. Especially Contrapunctus XIV.

post #291 of 345
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hubert481 View Post

He is absolutely sure to hear the difference between flac and wav.
 

Seriously? Does he know it is a lossless format? If everything went fine during the compression *none* of the information should be missing\altered\corrupted.

post #292 of 345
He never did any test, i was asking for.
post #293 of 345

Damn this question is intense. I personally, and I think that a lot of people here try and get the best from audio and music, beacuse we love it. If I could pick anything in this world, and be the best at it, I wouldn't be a doctor, or a pharmacist (someone who can change the world in the blink of an eye), I would be a composer. Nothing that drastically changes the world, but something incredible none the less.

Close second is a brilliant math god. 

I chose to buy and blow all my cash on audio, because I want to hear what a composer hears in his head when he is making a masterpiece, so I can be as amazed as he is when I hear it played. I want to hear what someone would hear when attending something live. 

But the dream of a math god...could really change the world. Maybe come up with a type of physics that tells us what happens when the current laws of physics are broken.

post #294 of 345
Quote:
Originally Posted by syNRG View Post
But the dream of a math god...could really change the world. Maybe come up with a type of physics that tells us what happens when the current laws of physics are broken.

I am no math god (but a I was briefly a math major in college) and I can tell you what happens when the current laws of physics are broken:

 

All those wacky audiophile fringe products actually start to work. For example any of the products from this company: http://www.machinadynamica.com/index.html

post #295 of 345
Quote:
Originally Posted by ralphp@optonline View Post
 

I am no math god (but a I was briefly a math major in college) and I can tell you what happens when the current laws of physics are broken:

 

All those wacky audiophile fringe products actually start to work. For example any of the products from this company: http://www.machinadynamica.com/index.html

Can you tell me what happens once you enter the event horison of a black hole?

post #296 of 345
Quote:
Originally Posted by ralphp@optonline View Post

I am no math god (but a I was briefly a math major in college) and I can tell you what happens when the current laws of physics are broken:

All those wacky audiophile fringe products actually start to work. For example any of the products from this company: http://www.machinadynamica.com/index.html

Hey, what are you complaining about? They have a money back guarantee.
post #297 of 345
Quote:
Originally Posted by syNRG View Post
 

Can you tell me what happens once you enter the event horison of a black hole?


I believe that when one enters the event horizon of a black hole rap music becomes listenable and enjoyable.

post #298 of 345

Plenty of people on these forums (no, I won't name any) are much more into the gear than the music, much more into 'getting the most neutral system to hear the recording as it was recorded' than 'building a system which lets me enjoy even poor, old recordings I love'. As such, these people set aside poor recordings and focus on the highest quality recordings available without a care about the music itself.

 

It's a sad reality of the audiophile hobby, unfortunately. Just look in the Music sub-forum, and what music/recordings people tend to talk about and you'll know what I mean. A quick peak in the Sound Science sub-forum as well, but really, if you bother reading reviews for all the 'higher-end' gear, you'll find the same thing happening there as well. Just look at how many "audiophile meets" or "listening rooms" at hi-end dealers won't let you use your own music to test the gear out.

 

My system is costly enough (though nowhere near some of the other systems out there), but my music collection is still worth quite a few times more than the system itself, and I wouldn't have it any other way. Ultimately though, people do what they want with their money - if they prefer building a system centered around neutrality which will sound terrible with poor recordings, and spend hundreds of thousands of dollars doing so, that's their prerogative. I for one would rather buy gear that will let me enjoy every single album I own.


Edited by elmoe - 2/28/14 at 3:23am
post #299 of 345
Quote:
Originally Posted by elmoe View Post
 

As such, these people set aside poor recordings and focus on the highest quality recordings available without a care about the music itself.

 

My system is costly enough (though nowhere near some of the other systems out there), but my music collection is still worth quite a few times more than the system itself, and I wouldn't have it any other way. Ultimately though, people do what they want with their money - if they prefer building a system centered around neutrality which will sound terrible with poor recordings... I for one would rather buy gear that will let me enjoy every single album I own.

 

elmo, I think that you (like a few others) have misunderstood some of the enthusiastic gear comments, so that you have built up a caricature, rather than a real person, in your head. I like playing with toys, but my goal has always been to get more musical pleasure from as wide range as possible of my good and bad recordings. And I've never come across a real audiophile who was different in this respect. 

 

A truly neutral, high end system does not sound terrible with poor recordings. As my system as improved, my worst recordings have become more listenable, even though the gap between good and bad becomes ever more apparent. So the deficiency of a poor recording may become glaringly obvious if played immediately after a good recording, but the poor recording can still sound just fine when taken on its own merits. The key is to keep playing a wide range of recording qualities, based on the music you want to hear at the time.

 

There's a difference between the words used by people when they are testing or comparing gear, compared to the same people when they're enjoying their music. The former is what most appears on gear forums because, erm, they're gear forums.

post #300 of 345
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheAttorney View Post
 

 

elmo, I think that you (like a few others) have misunderstood some of the enthusiastic gear comments, so that you have built up a caricature, rather than a real person, in your head. I like playing with toys, but my goal has always been to get more musical pleasure from as wide range as possible of my good and bad recordings. And I've never come across a real audiophile who was different in this respect. 

 

A truly neutral, high end system does not sound terrible with poor recordings. As my system as improved, my worst recordings have become more listenable, even though the gap between good and bad becomes ever more apparent. So the deficiency of a poor recording may become glaringly obvious if played immediately after a good recording, but the poor recording can still sound just fine when taken on its own merits. The key is to keep playing a wide range of recording qualities, based on the music you want to hear at the time.

 

There's a difference between the words used by people when they are testing or comparing gear, compared to the same people when they're enjoying their music. The former is what most appears on gear forums because, erm, they're gear forums.

 

I've been in this awhile, and met my fair share of audiophiles also. There has been no caricature built up, I assure you. When I say "truly neutral", I mean on paper. I can't help but notice your BHSE, which is pretty much the opposite definition of "neutral" (at least as far as sound science goes). Certainly, considering your gear, I'm sure poor recordings sound absolutely great. That is not going to be the case with a truly neutral system though.

 

As for reviews and the vocabulary used, that isn't my main problem. My main problem is the limited recordings used in those reviews, and the even more limited number of reviews that take them into account first and foremost. I personally am more interested in reading about how a specific recording sounds paired up with X or Y piece of gear rather than a general "soundstage is really wide, the highs glitter like gold in starry night skies" or "this silver cable really makes the music go faster", etc. Keep in mind though that this isn't true for every review out there, but a lot of them don't even mention the music at all.

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