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Do audiophiles "like" music? - Page 16  

post #226 of 345
Quote:
Originally Posted by k3oxkjo View Post

 

From what I see, relatively few people really "love" music.

 

How many people do you know who devote an evening to just listening to music? Not hanging with friends with music playing, not listening while performing chores, not listening on IEM's to distract themselves from the bustle on their commute, but listening to music as a solitary activity on a consistant basis? Relatively few, from what I see.

 

This is not meant as a criticism, BTW. The things I mentioned are quite reasonable uses for music. But, in common with most hobbies or activities, there are far more casual music users than devoted ones.

 




That comes across a tad pretentious. Just because people do not all prescribe to the usage pattern of listening to music that you describe above, does not mean they "love" music any less than those that do. To me that's like saying a parent that stalks thier kids 24/7 and know everything they are doing at all times "loves" their children more than parents that give them space.


I can assure you, when I am singing my lungs out in my car, I love music just as much as anyone smily_headphones1.gif
post #227 of 345
Quote:
Originally Posted by bdh View Post
 

 

Three things:

 

1. The only people I've ever known to do this with speakers are 'audiophiles'.

 

2. Doing this with headphones is relatively common in my experience.  (Lying on your bed listening.  Sitting somewhere listening.  etc.)

 

3. Personally, I would do much less of both if I didn't have incredible playback systems.

 

That basically concludes the argument.

 

What you have stated is very true.  

 

Only an Audiophile would spend an evening doing nothing but listening to music via speakers.

 

Case closed.

post #228 of 345
Quote:
Originally Posted by Muinarc View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by k3oxkjo View Post
 

 

From what I see, relatively few people really "love" music.

 

How many people do you know who devote an evening to just listening to music? Not hanging with friends with music playing, not listening while performing chores, not listening on IEM's to distract themselves from the bustle on their commute, but listening to music as a solitary activity on a consistant basis? Relatively few, from what I see.

 

This is not meant as a criticism, BTW. The things I mentioned are quite reasonable uses for music. But, in common with most hobbies or activities, there are far more casual music users than devoted ones.

 




That comes across a tad pretentious. Just because people do not all prescribe to the usage pattern of listening to music that you describe above, does not mean they "love" music any less than those that do. To me that's like saying a parent that stalks thier kids 24/7 and know everything they are doing at all times "loves" their children more than parents that give them space.


I can assure you, when I am singing my lungs out in my car, I love music just as much as anyone smily_headphones1.gif

I might not put it in the same way as k3oxkjo, but to be fair, what he was saying was more like suggesting a parent who never pays attention to their kid without also doing something else doesn't really love their kid, which is possibly true.

post #229 of 345

I asked Orpheus what he thought of this discussion.

 

" Music is my life I could no more dream of not doing it than of breathing. What is love compared to this? 

post #230 of 345
I listen to music as I go about various other tasks. Most often commuting so that I don't have to suffer other people talking on their phones!
I buy gear attempting to achieve a point where the sound does not have anything ostensibly lacking. Then I can forget the gear and get back to the music.
Anything obviously wrong with the sound bugs the life out of me.
Music has been a pleasure in my life for about 40 years. I love music. I am always looking for new stuff to enjoy.
If I don't enjoy a piece of music that has been produced with real intent and passion then I figure that is my loss.
To the OP' s bonus question. Jimi Hendrix Experience. Electric Ladyland.
post #231 of 345

I'm usually on the computer after work listening to music for 3-4 hours a night most nights of the week. I'm always actively getting albums, exploring other genres and listening to at least a new album every day. I'd like to thing that I enjoy more than just gear despite owning many high end headphones. I enjoy the fidelity much more with better phones, but it was not as if the music has ever been ignored on lower headphones. If anything headphone hifi has led me to music I never thought about before and made me heavily explore it.


Edited by Roronoa - 12/20/13 at 4:56pm
post #232 of 345

I was an audiophile; but, with therapy, I have come to realize my obsessive/compulsive passion for sound improvement was not a healthy pursuit. The audiophile temptation came to me initially when the record playing component of my first HI-FI failed to properly track recordings. From there, I began upgrading; but, I was never satisfied that I had a distortion free musical experience. It appeared that in my quest for sound improvement I was becoming  distracted from my enjoyment of music. At one point; when I rediscovered a Magnavox AM transistor radio in my closet, that was given to  me when I was a kid, and recalling the  countless hours of pleasure I had listening to music from it, I knew my audiophile interest was undermining the  music. Today, I am completely satisfied with what I get from the electronics I own,including the last turntable I purchased over 35 years ago. I no longer feel compelled to buy something off the conclusion of someone writing for a audiophile rag who has promised an improved listening experience.  I am free at last, And  now my music has never sounded so sweet. 


Edited by sterling1 - 12/22/13 at 5:07am
post #233 of 345

The audiophile bug hit me as a young child with two tins and string attached to their bases in a crude telephone simulation.

I spent 21 years of my life as a technician in Australia's greatest telecommunications conglomerate delving into the dark arts of information propagation over wires.

 

I also built my first amplifier and speaker boxes to start my climb in ignorance up the slippery slope of higher fidelity in the Quixotic quest for audio nirvana.

 

I have now, after numerous attempts to deny it, become comfortable in the realisation that I am a aurally induced audiophile with no hope nor desire to be cured of this supposed compulsion.

 

Quote:sterling 1
 but, with therapy, I have come to realize my obsessive/compulsive passion for sound improvement was not a healthy pursuit.

There is NO such thing as an effective therapy for this magnificent obsession. I can only surmise that sterling 1 was NOT a true audiophile in the first instance.

 

It appears that he was relieved of finances which could have been better spent on audiophile products to purchase a "cure" which in either case was ineffective.

 

If he were a true audiophile, the "cure' would have been totally ineffective.

If he were not a true audiophile, he would eventually woken up to his delusion and would eventually be in possession of more audio toys.  If he had not had the supposed "cure" inflicted upon his personage he would still be no better off financially.

 

ergo,: audiophilia is for audiophiles, but the sonically challenged can also play.      Enjoy.

post #234 of 345

I'm a bit obsessive-compulsive and part of my search for high-end equipment involved some pickiness--rejection of stuff with obvious flaws. But now that I've found great equipment for my tastes, I just enjoy it. A LOT. It's the same reason I enjoy live music a lot--live music has powerful dynamics and great beauty of sound. My headphone system doesn't come close to live music, but it has enough beauty to be enjoyable.

 

Mike

post #235 of 345
Audiophiles can still enjoy music. As an audiophile I realised a while back that I was spending too much time swapping between kit and I sold off 4 headphones. The most prized piece of music is the one waiting for you to discover it.
Music is an experience, a memory of a never to be repeated concert or of how you were struck dumb by hearing something important for the first time. I don't think the world would feel the same to me without Dark Side of the Moon. Hypothetically I wouldn't swap it for my HD800s; there's a lot of really good music out there; I'd settle for The Wall
post #236 of 345

Wow, I just read through this entire very interesting thread. Here a few of my comments followed by a few brief responses to some specific posts.

 

235 posts and only one brief mention of the fact that compared to music, audio reproduction via electronic means has been around for a short time (see first quote below). Since the first time some primitive man banged two sticks together music has been part of the human experience and music will always be part of the that experience. I'm not sure that audio equipment will ever enjoy the same staying power.

 

History has always been important when it comes to the music. What we commonly refer to "classical" music is perhaps the most historically rich of all music. For example a newly composed string quartet can be said to stand on the shoulders of the all the other string quartets that came before it. I find a similar relationship in the area of jazz where every new trumpet solo owes unmeasurable gratitude to ground breaking work of the great Louis Armstrong from nearly 90 years ago. And speaking of history, many of the earliest jazz recordings, while sonically inferior to most modern recordings, are as musically relevant today as the day they were recorded and deserve to be played on any audio system no matter how lo-fi or hi-fi.

 

Which brings me to my next point - why the "music" section fails to appeal to me. I've tried several times to follow along and join in on several discussions about jazz, a musical genre that I know a thing or two about, but frankly I get bored real fast with the billionth mention of how f*&king essential "Kind of Blue" is or how great the latest Billie Holiday wannabe is. Perhaps I'll give it another chance and try starting a thread about some of the great European jazz orchestras currently preforming and recording.

 

As to the definition of what constitutes music may I suggest that one have a look at the wonderful film "32 Short Films About Glenn Gould". There is a scene in the film where Gould is sitting in his favorite diner listening to the various conversations going on around him and by shifting his focus from one conversation to another he "composes" a sort of fugue.

 

 

Okay where were we. Let's see. Why do audio equipment reviewers have such bad musical tastes? I don't know but there seems to be some kind contest among these clowns as to who can use the most obscure music when listening to the equipment under review. The Beatles? no way. The Rolling Stones? never. A personal recording of the West Lost Lake Symphony Choir performing in 1972? That's just the ticket! Now the reader will have absolutely no idea how the equipment sounds.

 

And speaking of equipment the advent of digital recording and playback to my ears as really narrowed the gap between mid-fi and hi-fi, so much so that for less than the cost of an original Sony Walkman one can put together a headphone based system that will sound better than a high end headphone system from 1960s or 1970s even using $5 USB cables :)

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Destroysall View Post
 

It's comprehension; it's a social custom. Classical music has often been given its own significance of several qualities to the young general public. It's not that they have no appreciation for it, it's that they have no interest. There are numerous amounts of students who are in school bands and have school concerts in which many other students attend. Their general lack of interest is mostly due to the fact that their knowledge of the Classical genre as a whole is small. I don't speak for many young people, because being young myself I can testify to loving classical music and I know several others my age and even younger who adore Classical music and have an enormous knowledge of how it works. Of course, most of us young people are musicians as well. I personally have a huge history of the trombone (being a player for almost 7 years now). I don't think you have to have good equipment to enjoy music. You forget that there was a time when the only way to listen to music was to hear a musician perform in person.

The first and only mention of the simple fact that music has been around much longer than audio equipment. See above.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by k3oxkjo View Post

You have numerous examples of blind listening where reviewers cant distinguish cheaper from very expensive.

 

Not really...

 

Of course "not really..." since none of the current crop of clowns (my personal term for all high end audio equipment reviewers) would EVER submit to a double blind test.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by kurochin View Post
 

Attend enough A/V shows/meets .....  Between measurebators talking about cables and base stands (so I need to buy a thousand dollar resonance eliminating traffic cone to prevent "slight smearing", yeah sure), test playlists that feature the same gregorian chanting or geezer-jazz from 400 B.C or an acoustic banjo dullsville by some guy named Paco, and the occasional knob closing his eyes with his arms folded pretending to be "transported" in order for his fellow knobs to get a good photo ..... you'd swear that the majority were just providing free speech for the deaf.

This is the main reason why whenever an A/V show is announced in a venue near one's home, one should run as far away as possible.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by k3oxkjo View Post
 

 

From what I see, relatively few people really "love" music.

 

How many people do you know who devote an evening to just listening to music? Not hanging with friends with music playing, not listening while performing chores, not listening on IEM's to distract themselves from the bustle on their commute, but listening to music as a solitary activity on a consistant basis? Relatively few, from what I see.

 

This is not meant as a criticism, BTW. The things I mentioned are quite reasonable uses for music. But, in common with most hobbies or activities, there are far more casual music users than devoted ones.

I've been spending evenings listening to just music, as in sitting down with no distractions and listening, for most of my 58 years (soon to be 59 years) and through all those years I've had many different audio systems, from all-in-one record players to my current modest high end system. While the stereo system has always been fairly important it has never been more important than music.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Muinarc View Post

I can assure you, when I am singing my lungs out in my car, I love music just as much as anyone smily_headphones1.gif

Perhaps the best comment of the entire thread. Thanks!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris J View Post
 

 

That basically concludes the argument.

 

What you have stated is very true.  

 

Only an Audiophile would spend an evening doing nothing but listening to music via speakers.

 

Case closed.

I'm confused, what does listening via speakers have to do with being or not being an audiophile, or music lover for that matter?

post #237 of 345
Quote:
Originally Posted by ralphp@optonline View Post

 

I'm confused, what does listening via speakers have to do with being or not being an audiophile, or music lover for that matter?

 

Can't follow my train of thought?

 

Oh well.

post #238 of 345
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris J View Post
 

 

Can't follow my train of thought?

 

Oh well.


No seriously I just don't understand what listening via speakers, as opposed to headphones, has to do with being an audiophile. And by the way I have both very nice sounding speakers (Vandersteen Model 3A Signatures with a Vandersteen 2wq subwoofer) and very nice sounding headphones (Beyerdynamic T1s, Sennheiser HD 650s). I would appreciate some clarification, if possible.

post #239 of 345
Quote:
Originally Posted by ralphp@optonline View Post
 


No seriously I just don't understand what listening via speakers, as opposed to headphones, has to do with being an audiophile. And by the way I have both very nice sounding speakers (Vandersteen Model 3A Signatures with a Vandersteen 2wq subwoofer) and very nice sounding headphones (Beyerdynamic T1s, Sennheiser HD 650s). I would appreciate some clarification, if possible.

 

Let me rephrase,

I was only replying to a previous post, in context of this thread.

Taken alone, or in isolation, my post does lose it's meaning.

I could have just as easily have said headphones.

 

To clarify further, my answer must be taken in context of the thread.

To be 100% accurate, you could argue that a music lover who cares nothing about "the audiophile thing" would be ONE type of person who would make a habit out of doing nothing but listen to music all night, whether recorded or live, and get a great deal of pleasure out of this.

Obviously, not all music lovers are audiophiles.

But personally, I have never met an audiophile who is not a music lover. 

 

I do agree with your comment about the headphones.

If you only listened via headphones, but had all the other audiophile traits, then you're an audiophile.

 

Frankly, I was slightly offended by the original question the thread poses:   "Do Audiophiles Like Music".

It's almost insulting.

As I said, I've never met an audiophile who doesn't love music.

Sure, some audiophiles may get far too obsessive WRT equipment (I probably do) but it does not mean that we are not passionate about music.

 

In closing, I should not have been so flippant...:o


Edited by Chris J - 1/3/14 at 3:23pm
post #240 of 345
;)Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris J View Post
 

 

Let me rephrase,

I was only replying to a previous post, in context of this thread.

Taken alone, or in isolation, my post does lose it's meaning.

I could have just as easily have said headphones.

 

..........

 

In closing, I should not have been so flippant...:o

Thanks Chris and now I understand what you were trying to say. I should have known that you would give me a straight answer simply based on the number of your head-fi posts. One cannot have so many post around here and be a jerk :smile_phones:

 

Now while I agree with you that it is rare to find an audiophile who is NOT a music lover, it is not uncommon to find an audiophile who is a gear lover first and a music lover second. For me the biggest turn off is "audiophile" approved music such as the dreck that passes for listenable music on those infamous Harry Pearson "Super Disc Lists", which thankfully are no longer being published. As I noticed while reading this thread, Miss Krall and Miss Jones have gladly stepped in to fill that void.

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