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Light Harmonic GEEK - Page 55

post #811 of 1234
Quote:
Originally Posted by Idsynchrono_24 View Post

Can anyone explain the what the 2X, 4X, 8X pertains to on the back of the GEEK? The documentation that came with the unit didn't mention anything

Isn't it a multipler for the bitrate? I remember they mentioned it somewhere on the paper it came with. 48k,96k, 192k etc etc
post #812 of 1234
Quote:
Originally Posted by Exesteils View Post

Isn't it a multipler for the bitrate? I remember they mentioned it somewhere on the paper it came with. 48k,96k, 192k etc etc

Ah, that sounds like it might be it. Thanks. Was just flipping over the unit and couldn't make heads nor tails of it since it was inscribed under "3D"
post #813 of 1234
It is a multiplier for the sample rate. Not the bitrate. Say you bought a 24bit/192khz file, you would see the 48khz and 4x LEDs light up
post #814 of 1234
Quote:
Originally Posted by kugino View Post
 

this is head-fi. i'm sure some idiot will try to argue that it does make a difference. ;)

 

At AXPONA, a vendor claimed that music sounded noticeably better when the music files and the OS were on different internal SSDs.


Edited by jonbernard - 5/13/14 at 9:58am
post #815 of 1234
Quote:
Originally Posted by jonbernard View Post

At AXPONA, a vendor claimed that music sounded noticeably better when the music files and the OS were on different internal SSDs.
At AXPONA, a vendor claimed that music sounded noticeably better when the music files and the OS were on different internal SSDs.

Yeah, I also remember a computer audio seminar where the guy from Audioquest said that very same thing. That maybe true, but I can guarantee it is not a "veil has been lifted" kind of thing. It maybe more dependent on the mothermoard design, etc. the idea is to use different data paths (or bus) for the audio. Say you use a USB3 hard drive and connect to a USB 3 port, and then connect your GO (usb 2.0 protocol) on a USB 2.0 port, which has a separate datapath and its only common point is on a specific area on the motherboard (memory controller, usb controller) where data bandwidth/management is not a concern.

If both, the external usb and the usb dac share the same bus (ie like two adjacent usb 2.0 ports) or you have many external hardrives or other devices connected to the same bus, it may or may not jitter induce noise or distortion or increase jitter....

I have tried this a couple of times and had no issue.... So for me it's no concern to worry much about it. Maybe something could happen if i try to stream a bluray iso of a concert in 1080p and 5.1 audio at 24bit/96khz

Edit: forgot to add: this is also why some people preferred firewire connected DACs. Since computers usually had only one port so the firewire was for that alone and was not shared.
Edited by eliwankenobi - 5/13/14 at 7:03am
post #816 of 1234
Quote:
Originally Posted by kugino View Post
 

this is head-fi. i'm sure some idiot will try to argue that it does make a difference. ;)


There was a previous post by Larry Ho in which it was stated the more things connected via USB (especially noisy moving parts HDDs), the generally worse a USB DAC will sound. That makes perfect sense and can be mitigated by having the DAC reside on it's own USB bus.

 

So while not exactly an answer to the OP's original question, i.e. external vs. internal, there is most certainly a difference in sound quality if the bus the DAC is on gets loaded down with various other noisy USB devices. If the OP's choice of either external or internal drive were to allow the DAC to have it's own bus, then yes it does make a difference.

 

That topic also dovetails with the idea that a software media player can improve sound quality simply by playback of the tracks from RAM, rather than constant disk access which is far noisier and puts USB disk access "traffic" simultaneous to the DAC's task of providing clean analog output. It's better to play the tracks through a RAM buffer.

post #817 of 1234
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeyFresh View Post


There was a previous post by Larry Ho in which it was stated the more things connected via USB (especially noisy moving parts HDDs), the generally worse a USB DAC will sound. That makes perfect sense and can be mitigated by having the DAC reside on it's own USB bus.

So while not exactly an answer to the OP's original question, i.e. external vs. internal, there is most certainly a difference in sound quality if the bus the DAC is on gets loaded down with various other noisy USB devices. If the OP's choice of either external or internal drive were to allow the DAC to have it's own bus, then yes it does make a difference.

That topic also dovetails with the idea that a software media player can improve sound quality simply by playback of the tracks from RAM, rather than constant disk access which is far noisier and puts USB disk access "traffic" simultaneous to the DAC's task of providing clean analog output. It's better to play the tracks through a RAM buffer.

Excellent post, thank you
post #818 of 1234

Anyone able to use their Geek out with android phone?

post #819 of 1234

Galaxy Note 3 (Android 4.4.2) with Geek Out 1000, usb 3.0 OTG (usb 2.0 OTG works too)

 

Stock Player, Neutron MP outputs at 48k regardless of source (DXD/192k are played at 48k),

UAPP output depends on source (DXD is played at DXD, 192k at 192k).

 

 

Stock Player

 

 

Neutron MP

 

UAPP

post #820 of 1234

Geek Wave - Reboot is now up:

 

Link: https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/geek-wave-it-s-not-a-next-gen-ipod-it-s-a-no-compromise-portable-music-player/

post #821 of 1234

Does not work with my Samsung Galaxy S3, and othets reported same with S4.

 

We are waiting for firmware update, which is maybe will arrive in few weeks, but off course LH offered kindly to "buy" Geek Wave...haha

post #822 of 1234
Quote:
Originally Posted by m-i-c-k-e-y View Post
 

Geek Wave - Reboot is now up:

 

Link: https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/geek-wave-it-s-not-a-next-gen-ipod-it-s-a-no-compromise-portable-music-player/


wow, dual mono balanced with femto and 128gb and expandable storage for $899. very tempted. 

post #823 of 1234
Just checked the LH labs forum and there are some pissed off people there who are wondering why their IGG geek out bundles have not shipped yet, but amazon shows geek outs as being "in stock". IGG backers for the bundle were promised to get their GO after the KS folk...so either the info on amazon is wrong or LH labs is not holding up to their campaign promise.
post #824 of 1234

Yeah, here's a link for the GO450. It could be a scammer but Amazon's pretty good about dealing with them. If it is indeed sold by LH Labs as the store name implies and customers can have them shipped in 48 hours I'll be disappointed considering I paid retail for a couple of my units months ago and new buyers can get them in 2 days now for the same price. Hopefully an official response comes soon.

post #825 of 1234
I thought $199 was a special pre-order price, not the official retail price...
https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/gavn8r/geek-a-new-usb-awesomifier-for-headphones
Quote:
GEEK takes a lot of the technology we developed when we were researching Da Vinci DAC, and squeezes it into one tiny little package that we plan on selling for $299 retail. Stick it into your laptop and plug in your headphones!
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