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Light Harmonic GEEK - Page 52

post #766 of 1642

Ah, solved the reason why my GO 450 remains on when PC is powered down. Turns out it was a BIOS setting. Now when PC is turned off the GO is off as well.

 

However, I noticed that at the moment the GO turns off there's a small "thump" sound from the speakers. And upon power up, there's a slight hiss/scratching sound which goes away after 1-2 seconds. Anybody else getting this?

post #767 of 1642
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcwc View Post

 

However, I noticed that at the moment the GO turns off there's a small "thump" sound from the speakers. And upon power up, there's a slight hiss/scratching sound which goes away after 1-2 seconds. Anybody else getting this?

 

Yeah I experience this as well. I'm guessing this is normal?

post #768 of 1642
Quote:
Originally Posted by akarise View Post
 

 

Yeah I experience this as well. I'm guessing this is normal?


I reckon if more users report this then it must be normal.


Edited by jcwc - 5/5/14 at 5:44pm
post #769 of 1642
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcwc View Post
 


I reckon if more users report this then it must be normal.

 

Glad that you found the solution regarding the USB power setting of your computer.

 

Yup, mine has a "thump" when Geek Out is turning off. I guess this is a common behaviour of Geek Out, but wonder if anything can be done to avoid or reduce the "thump". 

 

It's not a deal breaker though. I just have to remind myself to take out my IEM or turn down the volume of the external amp before shutting down everything to avoid damaging the speakers.

post #770 of 1642

Now with the Geek, I'm learning how to maximize the audio quality. One thing I read is about bit perfect audio, which requires the system volume to be at max (this I have done).

 

But how about the volume within the software (e.g. windows media player, BS player or other software)? I currently have it very low, like 10-20%. If I max the player volume then it would be too loud.

 

Secondly, what about the sound driver? I'm running XP and see some suggestions for changing to ASIO driver. Is that necessary? I'm currently just using the Geek driver.

post #771 of 1642
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcwc View Post
 

Now with the Geek, I'm learning how to maximize the audio quality. One thing I read is about bit perfect audio, which requires the system volume to be at max (this I have done).

 

But how about the volume within the software (e.g. windows media player, BS player or other software)? I currently have it very low, like 10-20%. If I max the player volume then it would be too loud.

 

Secondly, what about the sound driver? I'm running XP and see some suggestions for changing to ASIO driver. Is that necessary? I'm currently just using the Geek driver.

The Geek Driver is the ASIO driver.

 

The volume does not have to be at max for bit perfect audio. If you are playing 24bits files, you won't be loosing bits, unless you go below -24db on the volume slider from the Geek control panel. For 16bit audio, you start loosing bit at 48db, if I believe correctly. I am not completely sure, but its somewhere like that in the ballpark.  For me that translates into not lowering the volume anymore than 20%. Good luck for me, with my headphones, 20% is about a perfect volume, any higher than that and goes into louder than I feel confortable

post #772 of 1642
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcwc View Post
 

Now with the Geek, I'm learning how to maximize the audio quality. One thing I read is about bit perfect audio, which requires the system volume to be at max (this I have done).

 

But how about the volume within the software (e.g. windows media player, BS player or other software)? I currently have it very low, like 10-20%. If I max the player volume then it would be too loud.

 

Secondly, what about the sound driver? I'm running XP and see some suggestions for changing to ASIO driver. Is that necessary? I'm currently just using the Geek driver.

 

I won't recommend setting the system volume to max. With the volume control implementation of Geek Out, just increase your volume from low to high until a comfortable level for your listening. You won't really notice the effect of losing digital information.

 

For more info on the digital volume control for Geek Out's Sabre DAC, check this out: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JYjHKv2_OqQ

post #773 of 1642
Quote:
Originally Posted by eliwankenobi View Post
 

The Geek Driver is the ASIO driver.

 

The volume does not have to be at max for bit perfect audio. If you are playing 24bits files, you won't be loosing bits, unless you go below -24db on the volume slider from the Geek control panel. For 16bit audio, you start loosing bit at 48db, if I believe correctly. I am not completely sure, but its somewhere like that in the ballpark.  For me that translates into not lowering the volume anymore than 20%. Good luck for me, with my headphones, 20% is about a perfect volume, any higher than that and goes into louder than I feel confortable


Thanks for the info.

 

Do you know if adjusting the volume in the player software will similarly make you lose bits?

post #774 of 1642
Quote:
Originally Posted by yungyaw View Post
 

 

I won't recommend setting the system volume to max. With the volume control implementation of Geek Out, just increase your volume from low to high until a comfortable level for your listening. You won't really notice the effect of losing digital information.

 

For more info on the digital volume control for Geek Out's Sabre DAC, check this out: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JYjHKv2_OqQ


What's the reasoning behind not setting the system volume to max? Just trying to learn.

 

In the end I'm trying to balance between adjusting the system volume or the player volume?

post #775 of 1642
Quote:
Originally Posted by yungyaw View Post
 

 

I won't recommend setting the system volume to max. With the volume control implementation of Geek Out, just increase your volume from low to high until a comfortable level for your listening. You won't really notice the effect of losing digital information.

 

For more info on the digital volume control for Geek Out's Sabre DAC, check this out:

 

What's the reason behind not setting the system volume to max? Just trying to learn.

 

In the end I'm trying to balance between the system volume and player volume. I can't have both on max (too loud), so do I have it halfway on both? Or high on one and low on the other?

post #776 of 1642
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcwc View Post
 


Thanks for the info.

 

Do you know if adjusting the volume in the player software will similarly make you lose bits?

 

I'm sorry, I have no idea. What I know is Audirvana+'s volume control is controlling the same Master volume of OS X in the case of Geek Out.

post #777 of 1642
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcwc View Post
 

 

What's the reason behind not setting the system volume to max? Just trying to learn.

 

In the end I'm trying to balance between the system volume and player volume. I can't have both on max (too loud), so do I have it halfway on both? Or high on one and low on the other?

 

You can check out my earlier posts:

 

http://www.head-fi.org/t/711267/light-harmonic-geek-out-em-1000-impressions-and-appreciation-thread/420#post_10505414

 

http://www.head-fi.org/t/711267/light-harmonic-geek-out-em-1000-impressions-and-appreciation-thread/420#post_10505559

post #778 of 1642

Thanks!

post #779 of 1642
please people post comparisons or reviews if possible, thanks.
post #780 of 1642
Quote:
Originally Posted by eliwankenobi View Post
 

The Geek Driver is the ASIO driver.

 

The volume does not have to be at max for bit perfect audio. If you are playing 24bits files, you won't be loosing bits, unless you go below -24db on the volume slider from the Geek control panel. For 16bit audio, you start loosing bit at 48db, if I believe correctly. I am not completely sure, but its somewhere like that in the ballpark.  For me that translates into not lowering the volume anymore than 20%. Good luck for me, with my headphones, 20% is about a perfect volume, any higher than that and goes into louder than I feel confortable

Since GEEK uses 32bit data transfer, you shouldn't experience data loss with 24 bit files when setting the volume up to -48dB (1 bit equals 6dB).

With 16 bit files, you can set the volume up to -96dB without any loss.

 

-40dB means 16 times quieter, so Geek certainly provides enough of volume range without quality loss.

 

http://www.sengpielaudio.com/calculator-soundvalues.htm

 

 

 

 


Edited by BenF - 5/6/14 at 10:35am
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