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Light Harmonic GEEK - Page 71

post #1051 of 1367

Is it possible to somehow avoid the volume issue?

post #1052 of 1367
Quote:
Originally Posted by pearljam50000 View Post
 

Is it possible to somehow avoid the volume issue?

 

Stick with using volume control on the computer or on the GO, don't use both. From what I've read the experience is more consistent on a Mac so there's also that to keep in mind.

post #1053 of 1367
Quote:
Originally Posted by pearljam50000 View Post

Is it possible to somehow avoid the volume issue?
For OS X users, the volume control is pretty simple and straightforward.

For Windows users, the communication between the GO and the system volume make it confusing. It's suggested to adjust the volume only with the GO, or only with the system settings.
http://geek.lhlabs.com/force/geekoutsupport/1716-creation-of-a-comprehensive-volume-control-guide.html#26800
Quote:
1. The Windows OS slider controls the SLAVE volume. So basically as far as I understood your post and in regular how the volume implementation works is that the SLAVE always follows the Master. If the Master is set at 100% and the Slave at 50% and then you adjust the Masterslider to 98% the Slave jumps to 98%, because that's what the Master dictates.

The GO buttons are affecting the Master volume. So if we use the Windows slider to attenuate and keep the Master at 100% (which is set to 100% by rebooting etc..) and try to fine tune the volume via buttons we all get the aweful volume jumping to nirvana, as the Master is lowered by 1dB and the Slave volume is set to -1 (~99% max Volume).

2. Windows only keeps the Slave settings and not the Master settings on rebooting the PC or by plugging/unplugging the GO.

So the easiest way to "fix" the problem would be to change the volume slider controls for windows user, isn't it? If the Windows OS slider actually changes the Master volume and remembers it, everything should be fine. This is how it works with Mac OS.
post #1054 of 1367
Quote:

Originally Posted by miceblue View Post

I have absolutely no idea how volume control works in Windows XP SP2.

 

Okay, so things are working as expected. The first thing I do is try to use the volume keys, expecting them to work like in OS X. Nope. They do absolutely nothing, not even the mute button. So maybe the Dell drivers don't work, okay that's fine. I try to adjust the leftmost volume in the system volume slider as seen in the first image. Nope, nothing again. Strange....maybe the GO's hardware buttons? Nope, nothing again. Maybe one of the other volume sliders in the system volume control panel does something. Low and behlold, the "Wave" slider changes the volume for some reason. At this point I am thoroughly confused as to what actually controls the volume.

 

I'm using the Geek with Win XP SP3.

 

After installation of the Geek drivers I first set the volume using the regular Windows volume control. I have the "Wave" slider bar on max and the "Speaker" slider bar about 60% down. Actual playback volume (to suit my requirements) I adjust within the software doing the playback, e.g. foobar or MPCHC or youtube, etc.

 

I don't touch the volume buttons on the Geek itself.

 

This has worked out fine for me and I don't get any unexpected surprises.


Edited by jcwc - 7/15/14 at 7:22am
post #1055 of 1367

I have a package from Light Harmonic at home. I'm currently away from home so I won't know what it is until tomorrow but now I'm excited!

post #1056 of 1367
Quote:
Originally Posted by AxelCloris View Post
 

I have a package from Light Harmonic at home. I'm currently away from home so I won't know what it is until tomorrow but now I'm excited!

Did you order a GO? Very mysterious - keep us posted.

post #1057 of 1367

So my Light Harmonic package was indeed one of my Geek Outs. It turns out that it's my Geek Out 720 in black. Mine came packaged with a transparent slacker cable. I won't be using the slacker since the design requires the Geek Out be inverted during use. As we speak I'm using it with my AudioQuest Dragontail. Early impressions are leading me to think that this is one damned impressive little guy. I have little doubt that it will be replacing my Dragonfly. I'm starting out with the HE-400 but I'll be moving on to my CIEM before too long to see if I run into noise floor issues. You'd probably imagine that the background is quite dark with the HE-400, and you'd be right.

post #1058 of 1367
Quote:
Originally Posted by AxelCloris View Post
 

So my Light Harmonic package was indeed one of my Geek Outs. It turns out that it's my Geek Out 720 in black. Mine came packaged with a transparent slacker cable. I won't be using the slacker since the design requires the Geek Out be inverted during use. As we speak I'm using it with my AudioQuest Dragontail. Early impressions are leading me to think that this is one damned impressive little guy. I have little doubt that it will be replacing my Dragonfly. I'm starting out with the HE-400 but I'll be moving on to my CIEM before too long to see if I run into noise floor issues. You'd probably imagine that the background is quite dark with the HE-400, and you'd be right.

glad you got it! i have a green 720 coming who knows when, so i'll be interested to see what your impressions are. have fun!

post #1059 of 1367

I've had my geek out 450 for almost a week now. I find it to be great.  

 

I primarily use my Mac's OS's volume control, and then the geek out's for small adjustments. 

 

I'm glad I backed this kick starter. Cheers to the crew. 

 

 

A beginners impressions:

 

Misses - to be quickly forgotten:

 

-Upon initial plug in, the unit provides a strange static-like interference, lasting about three seconds. Happens every time. 

 

-An unpleasant surge when unplugged with headphones in. 

 

Hits - that keep bringing me back.

 

- Definitely airy and open. The 3D awesomefier actually affects the soundstage. It's subtle, yeah, but very noticeable when paying attention. I dig it. 

 

- It does a great job with LCD-X as a mobile solution. Also, My T5p's are happy with it; it's honest and doesn't push them to either side. 

 

I can't wait to hear what my non-audio-type friends think of the geek. 

post #1060 of 1367
I received my Geek Out units yesterday. I didn't get any information regarding a tracking number in my e-mail inbox, including spam, but after punching in the number on the shipping label, it looks like they used a 1-day shipping service.

Originally I returned my blue GO 450 because I was hearing a very audible background noise with sensitive headphones and earphones and others have reported not hearing the background hiss. Upon sending that unit back to LH, they personally tested it and Gavin himself reported back that the unit passed their inspection process. Some Test Results (Click to show)




182505879-THDN%20Ratio%201K%20-0dBFS.jpg

Gavin also recommended using the GO 100 for sensitive headphones and earphones. If you want the GO 100 though, you have to pay the price difference, $90. I opted out to get the GO 100 since I likely won't use the unit with said headphones.


Fast forward a week and now I have the blue GO 450 with a different serial number and a red GO 1000 from the Geek Pulse/Out combo + $100 Big Thanks perks.
Included in the box were quality control tests personally done by Manny. Quality Control Test Results (Click to show)
GO 450



GO 1000

Large Photos of Geek Out Units (Click to show)
If you can't tell in these photos, the red GO is more of a van cherry dark red instead of the typical brighter cherry colour from other photos. Also, the red GO has a rough/matte finish with a uniform texture whereas the blue GO has a smooth semi-glossy finish with a brushed metal-like texture.

In terms of sound quality, the two are identical, which is to be expected. In short, if you've heard the Objective DAC and Objective 2 amplifier, then the Geek Out sounds pretty close to them. It's transparent and provides minimally-coloured audio to your headphones.

In terms of noise floor, I can still make out the background hiss more easily with the GO 450 model than with the GO 1000 model, but not by much, which is strange to me. The background hiss is much quieter now than my previous unit. The old GO 450 unit used to have a hSSSSSSSS kind of background noise, and now it's more of a dulled husHHHHHHHHHH kind of sound, and is slightly more quiet with the GO 1000. Turning on the 3D Awesomifier though is a complete disaster for sensitive headphones; the noise floor is raised and instruments sound distorted and static-like, especially at low volume levels.
Edited by miceblue - 10/21/14 at 9:23pm
post #1061 of 1367

Again those are pointless and misleading lab results, it looks like the Audio Precision has an input impedance of 300 Ohms.

The results would likely be pathetic compared to the competition if those were measured with a 16 or 32 Ohm load.

I don't understand why LH Labs didn't even bother to get some iems and done some real life tests and tried their units with.

The issue is obvious unless their are all deaf.

post #1062 of 1367
Quote:
Originally Posted by zenpunk View Post

Again those are pointless and misleading lab results, it looks like the Audio Precision has an input impedance of 300 Ohms.
The results would likely be pathetic compared to the competition if those were measured with a 16 or 32 Ohm load.
I don't understand why LH Labs didn't even bother to get some iems and done some real life tests and tried their units with.
The issue is obvious unless their are all deaf.
No yeah I totally agree with you. The background hiss thing seems to be pretty common based on what I've seen with people who have received the GO 450. It seems silly to me that they have to offer another model, GO 100, to make up for people who use sensitive headphones/earphones. Power is not the issue at all. I get plenty of headroom regarding the volume with the GO 450, or even the GO 1000. I don't understand how a lower power would solve anything.
post #1063 of 1367

Got my Shiit Wyrd today. There is an obvious difference in the texture of bass. The overall signature seems to be less grainy and hence smooth. The lower noise floor gives more musical feel to the presentation. I don't see any difference in sound stage or tonal / timbre aspects. This is on a windows PC with enermax modular power supply. YMMV based on your setup. Overall, i would recommend it. I have used the USB cable that i had for my external HDD to connect the Wyrd to my PC. I have ordered Shiit usb cable as well. Not sure whether that is going to have such obvious impact. Let's see.

post #1064 of 1367
how many hours for break in?
post #1065 of 1367
Originally Posted by miceblue View Post
 

 

Err.... 20-27 uVrms of residual noise/hum is incredibly high --- that's within their accepted tolerances? I'd accept 15 uV and below, but my personal preference would be <5 uV.

 

I'm going to assume that (1) high current draw (otherwise it won't generate enough power without multiple step-up transformers and/or DC-DC converters), and (2) lack of galvanic isolation (otherwise it wouldn't be able to draw that much current) are to blame for the huge residual noise. But heck, what do I know.

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