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DIY Cable Questions and Comments Thread - Page 43

post #631 of 2713
Quote:
Originally Posted by cCasper TFG View Post
 

Mine's a 3.5mm chassis, and I can't seem to find the link I used in the US :confused:

 

That is a nice jack!

 
Just found these ones that could be amazing to use, they are a snap in with no hardware needed. Just a .375" hole and pop it in.

 

 

:beerchug:

post #632 of 2713
Quote:
Originally Posted by TrollDragon View Post
 

Thanks!

 

That is a REAN TINY xlr's and these are the ones I used:

http://www.rean-connectors.com/en/products/tiny-xlr-chassis-connectors/rt3mp

 

There is NOT very much room inside, so you can not put the locking nut on, you have to use epoxy on the jack to hold it in place.

 

Next time I think I a going to use these ones as the nut is on the outside, doesn't look as nice but would be easier to install I think.

http://www.rean-connectors.com/en/products/rt3mpr

 

Also be VERY careful of the drivers in the DTXXX series as the tangs that the headphone cable is soldered to is also connected to the voice coil wires. Those tangs are just pressed into the plastic an will pull out breaking the voice coil wire in the process. Both liquidzoo and myself have to do a resolder of the voice coil wire on one of our drivers. We were lucky.

 

If you do use the TINY xlr's you have to make sure that the hole for it is below the little shelf that the driver rests on, easy to do as the cup plastic is very soft and workable.

 

I had a local Industrial Electronics supplier bring them in for me, RAE was who I used.

 

Since your in Canada, electrosonic also carries them if there is an office local to you.

http://www.e-sonic.com/acc/products.aspx?partID=RT3MP&partIDExt=319&command=detail

 

The one with the nut on the outside would probably have to be ordered in for you from REAN through your supplier.

:beerchug:

 

Edit: I also have a pair of the Switchcraft Tini Q-G's that I paid twice as much for and I don't like them compared to the REAN's.

TB4M http://www.switchcraft.com/productsummary.aspx?Parent=808

 

Thanks a lot! again THANK you...

post #633 of 2713
Quote:
Originally Posted by i luvmusic 2 View Post

Thanks a lot! again THANK you...
You are Most Welcome!
If you have any questions just ask here and we will help if we can.
post #634 of 2713

When I sleeve with paracord do I remove the inner strand?

post #635 of 2713
Quote:
Originally Posted by siles1991 View Post

When I sleeve with paracord do I remove the inner strand?

What are you sleeving exactly?
post #636 of 2713
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kamakahah View Post


What are you sleeving exactly?

26awg wire

post #637 of 2713
I ment from who? Is it single wires or prewrapped canare or Mogami. If single, are they bare or insulated? Are you braiding it first?
post #638 of 2713
Quote:
Originally Posted by siles1991 View Post
 

When I sleeve with paracord do I remove the inner strand?

 

I think you're talking about the white strings, if so, yes.

post #639 of 2713
Quote:
Originally Posted by cCasper TFG View Post
 

 

I think you're talking about the white strings, if so, yes.

 

alright thanks

post #640 of 2713

I found this RCA Cable made by  MONSTER Cable at  a local surplus store for $5 /16.5 feet  it has 4 conductors plus one bare wire  it says the inner core are DOUBLEHELIX not sure if its really a DH cable.

I'm thinking of spliting it open to get the inner core to make some shorter RCA /inter connect.The core are very thin i'm wondering if its good for making RCA cable.

To make a RCA cable can i double up the wires per terminal/connection and do i need to twist the wires together or i can just sleeve them?

Any suggestion are welcome THANKS!

post #641 of 2713

DOUBLEHELIX as far as Monster goes means standard twisted pair.

You can always double up on conductors to make the cable a little more robust.

Quad braid or dual twisted pair per channel, you were thinking?  That will do.

post #642 of 2713
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Max View Post
 

DOUBLEHELIX as far as Monster goes means standard twisted pair.

You can always double up on conductors to make the cable a little more robust.

Quad braid or dual twisted pair per channel, you were thinking?  That will do.

Good to know THANKS!

post #643 of 2713

Received the Valab Rhodium Plated 3.5mm Connector. It looks really nice and well built. But it has a quite large housing diameter. Looks cool.

 

post #644 of 2713

This post is about home audio speaker cable, rather than RCA interconnects or headphone cable, but hopefully you guys might still be able to help me out.

 

Recently I helped a relative clean out his garage and basement.  Amidst the junk one accumulates over 30 years living in one place was ~100ft of audio cable.  I was told that I could have the wire if I wanted it, and so I took it off his hands.  The cable itself is MIT Terminator with 4 conductors.  A Google search informed me that this should be decent stuff, but I'm a little confused as to how I should use the cable.

 

Originally I thought all four wires were the same gauge so my plan was to create bi-amp cable to use with an old set of PSB speakers and a Denon AVR-X2000 receiver (the front channels are bi-ampable).  A quick inspection, however, showed that two of the wires look to be around 14 gauge and the other two are 16 or 18 gauge. Seeing as the gauges are different, utilizing this cable for bi-amping probably isn't the best idea, right?  Assuming bi-amping is a no-go, how should I configure these cables?  Could I bi-wire the cables, or would that still be problematic with different gauge sizes?  Or should I simply combine the individual wires to make one larger wire at the termination point?  I've included a couple of quick iPhone shots of the cable for reference.  I appreciate the help -- thanks in advance!

 

post #645 of 2713
Quote:
Originally Posted by OmegaRed1723 View Post
 

This post is about home audio speaker cable, rather than RCA interconnects or headphone cable, but hopefully you guys might still be able to help me out.

 

Recently I helped a relative clean out his garage and basement.  Amidst the junk one accumulates over 30 years living in one place was ~100ft of audio cable.  I was told that I could have the wire if I wanted it, and so I took it off his hands.  The cable itself is MIT Terminator with 4 conductors.  A Google search informed me that this should be decent stuff, but I'm a little confused as to how I should use the cable.

 

Originally I thought all four wires were the same gauge so my plan was to create bi-amp cable to use with an old set of PSB speakers and a Denon AVR-X2000 receiver (the front channels are bi-ampable).  A quick inspection, however, showed that two of the wires look to be around 14 gauge and the other two are 16 or 18 gauge. Seeing as the gauges are different, utilizing this cable for bi-amping probably isn't the best idea, right?  Assuming bi-amping is a no-go, how should I configure these cables?  Could I bi-wire the cables, or would that still be problematic with different gauge sizes?  Or should I simply combine the individual wires to make one larger wire at the termination point?  I've included a couple of quick iPhone shots of the cable for reference.  I appreciate the help -- thanks in advance!

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

 

 

So It looks like each color has two different sizes so use one color or the positive lead and the other two negative.  Just twist them together and stick them in a banana or spade and you should be good.  So you will need two sets of those but should work wonderfully.  

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