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DIY Cable Questions and Comments Thread - Page 29

post #421 of 2856
Quote:
Originally Posted by siles1991 View Post

Wait...you need special tools to use a type of wire? why?

Because litz wire has the individual strands insulated with a thin film of (usually) polyurethane enamel. To use it, you should first tin it in a solder pot to remove the insulation from the individual strands.

se
post #422 of 2856
Quote:
Originally Posted by DownhomeUpstate View Post
 

 

I didn't see this until after I posted. Nasty burn. What do you use the flux pot for, prepping Cardas litz wire?

The pot is for any kind of wire that has enamel on it, especially true litz wires that have each strand enameled.  

post #423 of 2856
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Eddy View Post


OUCH!

I've come close to doing that a time or two, which is why I no longer keep anything back behind the pot. Everything's either in front of it or to the side.

se

I used to have it pretty isolated since it has only two settings: off or hell's furnace.  Unfortunately, my DIY space is significantly smaller and cramped after I moved to the city.

post #424 of 2856
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Eddy View Post


Because litz wire has the individual strands insulated with a thin film of (usually) polyurethane enamel. To use it, you should first tin it in a solder pot to remove the insulation from the individual strands.

se

Is there any other way to remove the enamel without using a solder pot?  I've usually work with just regular wire, but litz wire has caught my eye of recent. 

post #425 of 2856
Quote:
Originally Posted by syobwoc View Post

Is there any other way to remove the enamel without using a solder pot?  I've usually work with just regular wire, but litz wire has caught my eye of recent. 

It can be stripped chemically, but that's some nasty business. And there are mechanical strippers, but they won't work well for very fine wires, plus a mechanical stripped will cost a hell of a lot more than a solder pot.

I think anyone who is working with wire, even just regular stranded wire should invest in a solder pot and some liquid flux and tin all wire ends before soldering.

se
Edited by Steve Eddy - 9/5/13 at 1:30pm
post #426 of 2856
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Eddy View Post


It can be stripped chemically, but that's some nasty business. And there are mechanical strippers, but they won't work well for very fine wires, plus a mechanical stripped will cost a hell of a lot more than a solder pot.

I think anyone who is working with wire, even just regular stranded wire should invest in a solder pot and some liquid flux and tin all wire ends before soldering.

se

I mean couldn't you also do it with a soldering iron?  It just takes a bit longer and isn't as easy.

post #427 of 2856

That's how I do it. I strip off the length of insulation, fan the wire strands out, lay it flat and scrape it with an Xacto knife, turn it over, and scrape the other side.

Then I twist the stands back together, put a dap of flux on it, tin the iron, and hold it to the wire until it bubbles the coating off. The soldering iron (station) has

to be quite hot to do this, and thank heavens that the coating is teflon so it doesn't melt back too much since I have to hold the iron to the wire for several

seconds to get all the coating off. I use Cardas wire BTW. I forgot to mention that I use a pretty good blob of solder when tinning the irons tip.

post #428 of 2856
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zashoomin View Post

I mean couldn't you also do it with a soldering iron?  It just takes a bit longer and isn't as easy.

Yeah, you can make a big mess with a soldering iron. But I'd recommend sticking to regular wire instead of that. The advantage of a solder pot is that as you dip the wire in, you can keep it moving so that all the residue from the flux and insulation is left in a trail behind the wire so the wire comes up nice and clean.

se
post #429 of 2856
Quote:
Originally Posted by funch View Post

That's how I do it. I strip off the length of insulation, fan the wire strands out, lay it flat and scrape it with an Xacto knife, turn it over, and scrape the other side.
Then I twist the stands back together, put a dap of flux on it, tin the iron, and hold it to the wire until it bubbles the coating off. The soldering iron (station) has
to be quite hot to do this, and thank heavens that the coating is teflon so it doesn't melt back too much since I have to hold the iron to the wire for several
seconds to get all the coating off. I use Cardas wire BTW. I forgot to mention that I use a pretty good blob of solder when tinning the irons tip.

Now try that with wire that's made up of 44 gauge strands.

biggrin.gif

se
post #430 of 2856

For that, I would need to put on my kid gloves.:biggrin:

 

Another thing I forgot to mention is that, if I need a short piece, I've learned to prep one end from a longer wire first, then cut it to length. If I cut it to length

first, when I start to scrape off the coating, it can pull all of the strands out of the insulation, because the teflon is so slick.

post #431 of 2856
Thread Starter 

Not trying to take this off-topic too far, but ...

 

Every now and then, I'll see someone who needs some assistance with soldering cables, etc.  I've offered my services for free, as long as the person covers the shipping.  However, I ran into a situation with offering as to what seemed like about a 45 minute time-frame for work, so I bit.  Getting into the project via discussions revealed

 

- Person needed a few special ends soldered onto some cable.

- The request list started to grow.

- I discussed some ways to make a pretty good cable based on the parts.

- Things were still going in a great direction.

- Then I realized the requester indicated that the cable would be used for an item that was soon to be sold.  Ugh!  What?

- Then, the request again started to grow more.

- Originally, the person was going to get a special connector and send it to me.

- Then, I received a message suggesting that I go ahead and purchase the plug.

- The list started to grow further.

- Before any of the cable items were discussed for finality so I could start planning, a request was made for me to recable other headphones.

- Then, a request to preserve certain features on headphone plug that was unique.  Etc., Etc.

 

Finally, I just had to say "No".  What started off simple, turned into a whole project.  Time is precious.  I work lots of hours.  Volunteer for 3 outside gigs.  Have a daughter in college.  A larger home to care for, etc.

 

There comes a time when a hobby just turns sour.  Now, I'm back to just do my own thing and content again.

post #432 of 2856
It happens. I'm very particular about accepting requests or offering. Some people are sketchy in their constantly changing requests. I had one person who spoke in past tense about purchases that hadn't been made yet.

So it's good you are sharing that. I add my own warning to DIYers that offer to help - Be cautious who you choose to help.
Edited by Kamakahah - 9/5/13 at 9:42pm
post #433 of 2856

Whats the easier way to repair a break at a 3.5mm termination?

 

 

 

I'm merely using these headphones as an example. Circled in red is the area where its broken. Only difference being on my phones its a 90 degree male 3.5mm termination. At first if I moved it downward I'd get sound out of the right ear. I have no experience with things like this so I was wondering what would be the easiest route?

post #434 of 2856
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mangudai View Post
 

Whats the easier way to repair a break at a 3.5mm termination?

 

I'm merely using these headphones as an example. Circled in red is the area where its broken. Only difference being on my phones its a 90 degree male 3.5mm termination. At first if I moved it downward I'd get sound out of the right ear. I have no experience with things like this so I was wondering what would be the easiest route?

 

The easiest way may not be the best way.  But, I'd recommend that you cut off the 3.5mm and replace it with a new one.  When you cut off the plug, leave about 2" of cable length connected to the plug.  Then, strip back the insulation from that 2" section of cable.  Get out the multimeter and check for conductivity on the TRS (Tip, Ring and Sleeve) and note the wire colors and how the correspond to each terminal for the plug.  Then, cut back about 1" of the insulation on the good section of the cable.  Tin the ends of the wires.  Then solder to a new 3.5mm connection.

 

Realizing that you posted a generic picture, but also note that most factory cables can tend to have a horrible built-in strain relief such as the one in the picture.  Quite often, one will experience a cable failure in the area described.

post #435 of 2856
@Wolfetan44, There are 3 categories of solid core silver, 1. Dead Soft, 2. Half Hard, 3. Full Hard.
Make sure you use dead soft silver solid core.

For insulate you can use cotton/nyilon sleeving, after braided use thin clear heatshrink.
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