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DIY Cable Questions and Comments Thread - Page 88

post #1306 of 1806
How can I make a TF10 cable?
post #1307 of 1806
Does anyone know where to buy para cord sleeve for 26awg 4 core cables ?
post #1308 of 1806
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brendanz View Post

Does anyone know where to buy para cord sleeve for 26awg 4 core cables ?
I believe 750 paracord should fit that. You should be able to find it on eBay or from a quick Google.
post #1309 of 1806
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoonSung View Post

I believe 750 paracord should fit that. You should be able to find it on eBay or from a quick Google.

Ok thanks. This 750 paracord is core-less for the wire right ?
post #1310 of 1806
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brendanz View Post


Ok thanks. This 750 paracord is core-less for the wire right ?

There is nothing inside of paracord except the white string that you're supposed to remove, so yes.

post #1311 of 1806
Quote:
Originally Posted by cCasper TFG View Post
 

There is nothing inside of paracord except the white string that you're supposed to remove, so yes.

Noted. Thank you . 

post #1312 of 1806
Hey guys.
I've asked this already, but nobody answered me, so I'll ask again so I know what to do.



I know 4 rings means TRRS, but if a cable has TRS or TRRS connectors, does that make it balanced?
I already have my headphone cable with TRRS 3.5 mm and TRS 2.5 mm, so if it's balanced already, I'll switch to recabling some other ICs or in ear hp.

Also, how can one measure the benefit of a newly built cable or compare two different cables? Spectrum analyzer? Oscilloscope? Recording my voice with an external microphone THROUGH that cable and create a matlab function that measures SNR and other stuff?


Thanks for the help.
Regards.
post #1313 of 1806
Quote:
Originally Posted by elafrican View Post

Hey guys.
I've asked this already, but nobody answered me, so I'll ask again so I know what to do.



I know 4 rings means TRRS, but if a cable has TRS or TRRS connectors, does that make it balanced?
I already have my headphone cable with TRRS 3.5 mm and TRS 2.5 mm, so if it's balanced already, I'll switch to recabling some other ICs or in ear hp.

Also, how can one measure the benefit of a newly built cable or compare two different cables? Spectrum analyzer? Oscilloscope? Recording my voice with an external microphone THROUGH that cable and create a matlab function that measures SNR and other stuff?


Thanks for the help.
Regards.


Your questions are way too board and require quite a bit of in depth information to properly answer. Thats probably why no one has taken the time to answer. Spend some time googling, learn what "balanced" actually means and whether or not cables actually make a difference at all.

post #1314 of 1806
Quote:
Originally Posted by ben_r_ View Post


Your questions are way too board and require quite a bit of in depth information to properly answer. Thats probably why no one has taken the time to answer. Spend some time googling, learn what "balanced" actually means and whether or not cables actually make a difference at all.

I did research balanced audio before asking questions. My common sense states that if a cable has 3/4 pin connectors they should be balanced, as I it useless to use those connectors and only 1 signal cable.
I'll try to remake the questions to be more spot on, if not, I'll drop the subject.

Did anyone experienced a cable with 3/4 pin connectors and only one signal cable?
What is your preferred method of determining the improvement of a new cable over an old one or a benchmark?

Some say it is an improvement, I guess the prices on cables for high end equipment(I do not own such equip and I might not feel any difference, but you don't know until you try it, plus I find it exciting to try it) reflect the improvements and some say there is no difference. In my electronics experience, diminishing noise using whatever methods is a good thing, it only remains to see if the user feels any difference, technology related there is one.

Kind regards.

Edit: I guess I can try and use a cable with 2 pin connectors on my headphones to see if there is any difference(provided my stock cables are balanced).
Edited by elafrican - 2/3/14 at 10:20am
post #1315 of 1806

A headphone has 2 signals going to it. It requires 4 wires and 4 pins on the connector to be balanced. All that means is that their is a separate ground for the left and right drivers. I don't know how your headphones are wired internally, if the TRRS jack in the headphones has 2 wires going to each driver then you can make a balanced cable fairly easily. If the stock cable has 4 wires in it and two are connected to the ground in the TRS then you can just replace it with a 4 pin or dual 3 pin connectors and connect it to a balanced amp. Now you'll need to use an adapter to use it with a standard amp.

 

Balanced interconnections are not the same as balanced headphone cables. The former uses a hot, cold, and a ground reference while the latter jus indicates a headphone with separate grounds.

 

Unless you have a damaged cable or seriously undersized (the latter is common on cheaper headphones and some nice ones) don't expect a difference in the cable. Worry about aesthetics and feel. Dynamic drivers don't need more than 26awg generally 24awg being a little more durable. Orthos that require a lot of power benefit from 22-20awg wire.

 

Obviously I don't believe in the "value" of things like silver cables and über expensive plugs without proper cable clamps.

post #1316 of 1806
Quote:
Originally Posted by 65535 View Post
 

A headphone has 2 signals going to it. It requires 4 wires and 4 pins on the connector to be balanced. All that means is that their is a separate ground for the left and right drivers. I don't know how your headphones are wired internally, if the TRRS jack in the headphones has 2 wires going to each driver then you can make a balanced cable fairly easily. If the stock cable has 4 wires in it and two are connected to the ground in the TRS then you can just replace it with a 4 pin or dual 3 pin connectors and connect it to a balanced amp. Now you'll need to use an adapter to use it with a standard amp.

 

Balanced interconnections are not the same as balanced headphone cables. The former uses a hot, cold, and a ground reference while the latter jus indicates a headphone with separate grounds.

 

Unless you have a damaged cable or seriously undersized (the latter is common on cheaper headphones and some nice ones) don't expect a difference in the cable. Worry about aesthetics and feel. Dynamic drivers don't need more than 26awg generally 24awg being a little more durable. Orthos that require a lot of power benefit from 22-20awg wire.

 

Obviously I don't believe in the "value" of things like silver cables and über expensive plugs without proper cable clamps.


Thank you for your response. Kind of understood it all. My headphone uses a single source-hp cable and there is another cable going under the headband that connects the 2 drivers. Considering the cable has built in microphone, it can be, 1 ground, 1 microphone and 2 signal wires.

post #1317 of 1806
Quote:
Originally Posted by elafrican View Post


Thank you for your response. Kind of understood it all. My headphone uses a single source-hp cable and there is another cable going under the headband that connects the 2 drivers. Considering the cable has built in microphone, it can be, 1 ground, 1 microphone and 2 signal wires.

That is most likely the case, I think the only balanced 3.5mm TRRS is some obscure hifiman one.
post #1318 of 1806

Hi, I recently made my own cable. However, after finishing and testing it, I found that due to both ground cables being attached to the same ground pin in the 3.5mm jack, it transfers a bit of each channel into the other (only about 20% volume). I figured I could attach some diodes to the ground wire so that it'll prevent sound from coming up it, but it just distorted the sound, and I don't know what else to try.  Any help is appreciated!

post #1319 of 1806
Quote:
Originally Posted by jhao19 View Post
 

Hi, I recently made my own cable. However, after finishing and testing it, I found that due to both ground cables being attached to the same ground pin in the 3.5mm jack, it transfers a bit of each channel into the other (only about 20% volume). I figured I could attach some diodes to the ground wire so that it'll prevent sound from coming up it, but it just distorted the sound, and I don't know what else to try.  Any help is appreciated!

 

It doesn't really work that way... just consider that the ground is attached at the connector of all headphone cables and inside all unbalanced audio equipment.

post #1320 of 1806
Quote:
Originally Posted by FallenAngel View Post
 

 

It doesn't really work that way... just consider that the ground is attached at the connector of all headphone cables and inside all unbalanced audio equipment.

 

Hmm, true.  Then how should I stop the audio from leaking from one driver into the other?

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