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The Entry Level Stax Thread - Page 57

post #841 of 2456
Quote:
Originally Posted by mechgamer123 View Post
 

Anybody ever gone on a plane ride with their STAX? Not wearing them on the plane itself, just putting them in a carry-on.

I'm considering bringing my SR-202s back home over winter break, but I don't know if the cardboard and styrofoam box would fare very well.

they would fare fine if you carry them on.  I'd never check them.

post #842 of 2456
Quote:
Originally Posted by mechgamer123 View Post
 

Anybody ever gone on a plane ride with their STAX? Not wearing them on the plane itself, just putting them in a carry-on.

I'm considering bringing my SR-202s back home over winter break, but I don't know if the cardboard and styrofoam box would fare very well.

I guess that a second, bigger box would be a good choice, as the cardboard one doesn't offer a lot of protection. Those travel cases for music equipment would be a very good choice in my opinion! But I'm a bit of a perfectionist anyway...

post #843 of 2456
A STAX within a styrofoam case, within a cardboard box, within a bag, within a layer if bubble wrap, within a larger box, within a backpack, within a carry-on suitcase should be fine.
post #844 of 2456
Quote:
Originally Posted by Keithpgdrb View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mechgamer123 View Post
 

Anybody ever gone on a plane ride with their STAX? Not wearing them on the plane itself, just putting them in a carry-on.

I'm considering bringing my SR-202s back home over winter break, but I don't know if the cardboard and styrofoam box would fare very well.

they would fare fine if you carry them on.  I'd never check them.

Oh no, no way in heck would I ever check them.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by AManAnd88Keys View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mechgamer123 View Post
 

Anybody ever gone on a plane ride with their STAX? Not wearing them on the plane itself, just putting them in a carry-on.

I'm considering bringing my SR-202s back home over winter break, but I don't know if the cardboard and styrofoam box would fare very well.

I guess that a second, bigger box would be a good choice, as the cardboard one doesn't offer a lot of protection. Those travel cases for music equipment would be a very good choice in my opinion! But I'm a bit of a perfectionist anyway...

Do you have any recommendations for cases to use? I looked a bit on Amazon at pelican cases but didn't see anything that looked like it would be big enough without costing $100 or so.

post #845 of 2456
Quote:
Originally Posted by miceblue View Post

A STAX within a styrofoam case, within a cardboard box, within a bag, within a layer if bubble wrap, within a larger box, within a backpack, within a carry-on suitcase should be fine.

Of course that would work, but I want room for slightly more important things in my carry-on, like clothes. :tongue: 

post #846 of 2456
Quote:
Originally Posted by mechgamer123 View Post
 

Oh no, no way in heck would I ever check them.

 

Do you have any recommendations for cases to use? I looked a bit on Amazon at pelican cases but didn't see anything that looked like it would be big enough without costing $100 or so.


That's the problem... quality cases that are big enough cost quite something. Maybe you could use the case for something else in the future?

post #847 of 2456

I would put it like the same way if I was posting it, putting it in a thick plastic bag (that can be filled with air a a bit and then sealed, I don't know when I got one but it fits the Lambda perfectly) and some bubble wrapper around it one or two times for good measure should do the job just fine and does not take up that much space either. Or the original box is fine as well, plenty of options.

Maybe you should take them wearing around your neck but the headband wouldn't like that very much, so best is to put them on. I wonder if a Sigma would past security this way :-)

post #848 of 2456
Quote:
Originally Posted by AManAnd88Keys View Post
 

A triode has two systems inside the tube. The numbers should be as close as possible, that means that the two systems emit electrons equally strong. A higher number usually indicates that the tube is in a good shape. Depending on which type of tube and tube testing device there is a number that is equal to 100% quality (=full power).

 

An excellent explanation, +1.


Edited by Tus-Chan - 12/11/13 at 8:06pm
post #849 of 2456
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tus-Chan View Post

An excellent explanation, +1.
You're welcome!
post #850 of 2456
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AManAnd88Keys View Post
 

A triode has two systems inside the tube. The numbers should be as close as possible, that means that the two systems emit electrons equally strong. A higher number usually indicates that the tube is in a good shape. Depending on which type of tube and tube testing device there is a number that is equal to 100% quality (=full power).

more like the reverse:

 

The tube has two triodes in it.

the number indicates gain, so if the numbers are the same or similar then the gain is closely matched.

post #851 of 2456
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris J View Post
 

more like the reverse:

 

The tube has two triodes in it.

the number indicates gain, so if the numbers are the same or similar then the gain is closely matched.


Thanks for the correction!

post #852 of 2456

Triode = 2

 

The values resulted from testing tubes depends on the "tube tester" you use, either a Hickok, Amplitrex, SWL etc all have different readings for the tubes you're testing. There are 3 things you can test a tube based on it's plate resistance, plate current and transconductance. Most ebay sellers usually test the latter two being easier to measure and follow. Generally a NOS tube would be 2600 mho or 100, i.e unused but anything near these values is better or in other words the higher the value the better. When you buy "matched" set tubes, they are based on these values matching as closely to each other as possible as well as measurements on a curve tracer. 

To answer the original question the value is mu/gm.

 

This is what I know but theres more stuff online you can read about.


Edited by DefQon - 12/12/13 at 4:55am
post #853 of 2456
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DefQon View Post
 

Triode = 2

 

The values resulted from testing tubes depends on the "tube tester" you use, either a Hickok, Amplitrex, SWL etc all have different readings for the tubes you're testing. There are 3 things you can test a tube based on it's plate resistance, plate current and transconductance. Most ebay sellers usually test the latter two being easier to measure and follow. Generally a NOS tube would be 2600 mho or 100, i.e unused but anything near these values is better or in other words the higher the value the better. When you buy "matched" set tubes, they are based on these values matching as closely to each other as possible as well as measurements on a curve tracer. 

To answer the original question the value is mu/gm.

 

This is what I know but theres more stuff online you can read about.

 

Triode, by definition, DOES NOT = 2.

Many power triodes only have one triode in the tube envelope.

 

The tube envelopes normally contain 2 triodes in small signal devices, but there is no law or rules stating that they need to have 2 in them.

A triode is a 3 point device, grid, anode and cathode.

Theoretically, you could have three triodes in an 11 pin tube, pin 10 and 11 would be heater connections.  

 

 

The xx/xx number they were referring to is typically transconductance, i.e. gain: how much output current do you get referred to input voltage, expressed as "mho":   or amps per volt.

post #854 of 2456
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris J View Post
 

 

Triode, by definition, DOES NOT = 2.

Many power triodes only have one triode in the tube envelope.

 

The tube envelopes normally contain 2 triodes in small signal devices, but there is no law or rules stating that they need to have 2 in them.

A triode is a 3 point device, grid, anode and cathode.

Theoretically, you could have three triodes in an 11 pin tube, pin 10 and 11 would be heater connections.  

 

 

The xx/xx number they were referring to is typically transconductance, i.e. gain: how much output current do you get referred to input voltage, expressed as "mho":   or amps per volt.

You're right. It's a bit of a strange statement, as "tri" indicates there are 3 parts. If it was about the number two, then we would probably call it a diode or duode or something like that.


Edited by AManAnd88Keys - 12/13/13 at 10:19am
post #855 of 2456
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AManAnd88Keys View Post
 

You're right. It's a bit of a strange statement, es "tri" indicates there are 3 parts. If it was about the number two, then we would probably call it a diode or duode or something like that.

 

That's right!

A Diode has two terminals: Anode and Cathode

A Triode has three terminals: Anode (or Plate), Cathode and Grid.

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