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The Entry Level Stax Thread - Page 48

post #706 of 1230

All the old style Stax units (SR-3,5 etc.) are heavily damped so treble isn't their best attribute.  They were all designed before digital audio so that is a factor. 

post #707 of 1230
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by vid View Post
 

I had the K 701 and would say the SR-5 is an improvement in this toilet bowl standoff.

 

Toilet bowl stand-off!:beerchug:

LOL!

post #708 of 1230

Just bought some Electrets last night...not sure which model, probably SR-30 or SR-40.  They are silver, they use the SRD-4 adapter.  Like 'em quite a bit so far!  These are my first decent headphones, and the first time I've ever heard Stax.  I was intrigued by the electrostatic technology, since my main loudspeakers are planar (Magnepans).  I know there are some electret "bashers" on here, but for $40, I think I did okay :)

post #709 of 1230

Why don't you know what model they are? They should say so right on the headband.

post #710 of 1230

Can you tell me where or describe where the model number is on the headband?  The guy I bought them from couldn't find the model number either...I didn't believe him...but when I got them, I don't see a model number...just "Stax Electret Earspeakers."  I will check again when I get home, but I don't see any sort of identifying model number on the phones themselves.  Another member thinks they would be the SR-30 or SR-40.

post #711 of 1230
Gah, sometimes I wish I had just gone for a basic STAX setup instead of taking the usual "Head-Fi journey." XD

Anywho, I noticed that my SRS-2170 has a grounding issue and I can hear a quiet, low-frequency "ham" noise. Upon touching my aluminum MacBook, the sound goes away. I usually have my hands resting on the MacBook anyway, so I don't usually hear the noise. Can you guys think of any reason for this? I really can't imagine STAX built a poorly-designed unit.

MacBook Pro -> Monoprice USB-mini-USB cable -> JDS Labs ODAC with RCA output -> 3.5 mm-RCA cable -> SRM-252S + step-down transformer + wall wart from Japan -> SR-207
post #712 of 1230
Quote:
Originally Posted by miceblue View Post

Gah, sometimes I wish I had just gone for a basic STAX setup instead of taking the usual "Head-Fi journey." XD

Anywho, I noticed that my SRS-2170 has a grounding issue and I can hear a quiet, low-frequency "ham" noise. Upon touching my aluminum MacBook, the sound goes away. I usually have my hands resting on the MacBook anyway, so I don't usually hear the noise. Can you guys think of any reason for this? I really can't imagine STAX built a poorly-designed unit.

MacBook Pro -> Monoprice USB-mini-USB cable -> JDS Labs ODAC with RCA output -> 3.5 mm-RCA cable -> SRM-252S + step-down transformer + wall wart from Japan -> SR-207

 

This kind of hum is very common with systems that require multiple power sources and interconnects. It's most likely a ground loop, and when you touch your macbook your body acts as a sort of ground which absorbs some of the interference.

 

Which of your components have a grounded plug? Often this can be fixed by using a 3-prong to 2-prong adapter on one of your devices, depending on what it is. Some components also have a "ground lift" switch that does exactly that but without needing an adapter.


Edited by Punnisher - 11/13/13 at 1:53pm
post #713 of 1230
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Punnisher View Post
 

 

This kind of hum is very common with systems that require multiple power sources and interconnects. It's most likely a ground loop, and when you touch your macbook your body acts as a sort of ground which absorbs some of the interference.

 

Which of your components have a grounded plug? Often this can be fixed by using a 3-prong to 2-prong adapter on one of your devices, depending on what it is. Some components also have a "ground lift" switch that does exactly that but without needing an adapter.

 

I wouldn't remove the third pin from a power cable.

The third pin is a ground pin for safety and violates UL.

Your insurance company would not be too impressed if your house burned down if you removed the third pin.

Hopefully you have a "ground lift" switch somewhere.

post #714 of 1230
I've never experienced a problem with doing that. I would only remove the ground if absolutely necessary. It would probably just be for a single component anyway.

I can't speak for the macbook, but I would feel comfortable lifting the ground on it if present on a laptop powersupply. It's just a low voltage dc powersupply in a plastic enclosure. Besides, many are made without ground by design.

Do what you want, but I would at least try it to see if it fixes the problem. You can always explore a more "ul listed" method of breaking your ground loop.
post #715 of 1230
Uh, yeah, removing the ground is not going to create a fire hazard.

It can remove the safety feature that prevents the user from potential electrical shock if a live lead comes into direct contact with the metal chassis.

UL provides safety certifications, so removing the pin would invalidate the certification, but it's not breaking any law or regulation.
post #716 of 1230

None of my equipment is grounded at all.

post #717 of 1230

Power pack like the one used by Stax are double insulated, so it should not matter whether you have ground it or not.


Edited by rx79ez08 - 11/14/13 at 1:57am
post #718 of 1230
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Punnisher View Post

I've never experienced a problem with doing that. I would only remove the ground if absolutely necessary. It would probably just be for a single component anyway.

I can't speak for the macbook, but I would feel comfortable lifting the ground on it if present on a laptop powersupply. It's just a low voltage dc powersupply in a plastic enclosure. Besides, many are made without ground by design.

Do what you want, but I would at least try it to see if it fixes the problem. You can always explore a more "ul listed" method of breaking your ground loop.

Quote:
Originally Posted by shipsupt View Post

Uh, yeah, removing the ground is not going to create a fire hazard.

It can remove the safety feature that prevents the user from potential electrical shock if a live lead comes into direct contact with the metal chassis.

UL provides safety certifications, so removing the pin would invalidate the certification, but it's not breaking any law or regulation.

This is like saying I drove around without seatbelts or airbags in my car, or rode around without a helmet on my motrcycle and didn't have any problems.
If the equipment was NOT designed double insulated you can't just remove the ground pin because you think it's OK.
I can't speak for the US or Europe, but in Canada you can't just disable safety features because you feel like it.
post #719 of 1230
I never said I would recommend removing it, I just clarified the misconceptions you created.
post #720 of 1230
Quote:
Originally Posted by miceblue View Post

Gah, sometimes I wish I had just gone for a basic STAX setup instead of taking the usual "Head-Fi journey." XD

Anywho, I noticed that my SRS-2170 has a grounding issue and I can hear a quiet, low-frequency "ham" noise. Upon touching my aluminum MacBook, the sound goes away. I usually have my hands resting on the MacBook anyway, so I don't usually hear the noise. Can you guys think of any reason for this? I really can't imagine STAX built a poorly-designed unit.

MacBook Pro -> Monoprice USB-mini-USB cable -> JDS Labs ODAC with RCA output -> 3.5 mm-RCA cable -> SRM-252S + step-down transformer + wall wart from Japan -> SR-207

In case no one has answered this: You can either plug in your dac and amp into an ungrounded power strip, or you can plug your macbook into that one.

The ac/dc converters of laptops are known to cause these kinds of hums.

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