Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Headphones (full-size) › The Entry Level Stax Thread
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

The Entry Level Stax Thread - Page 92

post #1366 of 1369
Quote:
Originally Posted by electrostatics View Post

I was wondering the same thing...had this crazy idea to purchase an SR-009 for Christmas and running it off my SRM1 MK2. Does this make sense?

Any chance of taking your amp to a meet and trying an 009 or even an 007? I listened to both at a meet this year, but they were driven by an Eddie Current. That setup was so popular that I didn't get a chance to try either driven by my SRM1 MK2 Pro. Had fun with lots of Lambdas though, and even a normal bias Sigma.
post #1367 of 1369
Can anyone provide a summary of how e-stat amps work in Layman's terms? The prices range from $200-$6000, so I'm just curious to know what can be done inside of an e-stat amp to make the price range so large.

For normal headphone amplifiers you've got op-amps, output resistors and capacitors, different jacks, linear power supplies, etc. I'm not sure if op-amps are even used in e-stat amps as opposed to your Average Joe transistors.
post #1368 of 1369

The problem as I understand it is the very high voltages required. Since a lot of electronics, such as TVs, have moved to much lower-powered solutions, the manufacture of a lot of high-voltage devices has ceased, making it harder to mass-manufacture amps. That means tube and transformer solutions.

post #1369 of 1369
Quote:
Originally Posted by miceblue View Post

Can anyone provide a summary of how e-stat amps work in Layman's terms? The prices range from $200-$6000, so I'm just curious to know what can be done inside of an e-stat amp to make the price range so large.

For normal headphone amplifiers you've got op-amps, output resistors and capacitors, different jacks, linear power supplies, etc. I'm not sure if op-amps are even used in e-stat amps as opposed to your Average Joe transistors.
I admit I haven't looked too much into it, so anyone feel free to correct my conjecture:

The older models came with transformer units that hook up to speaker taps... I think a dedicated e-stat amp is basically a speaker amp with a transformer (or maybe rated with the right voltage so it doesn't need a transformer) and instead of speaker taps it has Stax's proprietary plugs, so the headphones can plug right in. Apparently once they have enough power, e-stats are not very picky.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Headphones (full-size)
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Headphones (full-size) › The Entry Level Stax Thread