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Shure SE846 Impressions Thread - Page 23

post #331 of 16761
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlbrach View Post

i won both the 535 and the 846,is the 846 better?unquestionably!is it worth the upgrade?if you can afford the answer is yes,if you cannot the answer is no as with any other piece of technology...

I could not agree more.
post #332 of 16761

It looks like I have to import the Shure SE846 from an other country, since they will be shipping next year in 2014 over here.


Can I send my Shure SE846 to my domestic Shure distributor if I bought them from an other country for repairs?

post #333 of 16761
Quote:
Originally Posted by ubs28 View Post

It looks like I have to import the Shure SE846 from an other country, since they will be shipping next year in 2014 over here.


Can I send my Shure SE846 to my domestic Shure distributor if I bought them from an other country for repairs?

My guess is yes. Unlike my old SE535-J which was only sold and serviced in Asia, the SE846 is planned for worldwide distribution so service should be worldwide as well. To be on the safe side, I would email Shure's customer service and ask them. Their customer service is excellent.
Edited by spook76 - 10/30/13 at 6:23pm
post #334 of 16761

Was thinking about the offering of the three filters on this IEM, and just an idea, related to what I've been experimenting with in my IEM listening lately: frequency response reaction of the ear changes, depending on volume, and environmental circumstances.

 

One simple thing that always strikes me is that my different IEMs, earphones and experiences with speakers over the years has always led to a "volume sweet spot" that seems optimal for the particular transducer I'm focusing on.

 

Early on, with my first IEM, I found myself turning things up too loud, due to lack of bass and balance in the default sound.  As I've graduated to better/more recent IEMs, I am delighted to be able to turn the sound down, and get a good, distinct balance that lets me hear everything, high and low.

 

So, to my point: when you're listening to an IEM, it can be in a quiet environment, on the street, on an airplane or train or bus.

 

Each environment has a different effect on your perception of volume and frequency spectrum balance, even with good isolation.  I noticed this early on, when the simple fact of AC turning on in an apartment or home basically killed all the sonic detail I'd be able to hear with it off.  Ditto with vinyl; any distortion, noise, flutter, wow, hiss, etc. changes the noise floor so that the smaller details of the music get masked (and the transients become less precisely heard as well, no matter how well they're captured).

 

The filters on the SE846 seem to be, among other things, useful for tuning the IEMs for the kind of environment you're listening in.  I always find bass lacking when I'm listening to IEMs on an airplane, for instance, even with good isolation; using the warm filter on the SE846 for flights, I'd be willing to bet, solves that problem.  At the other extreme, wanting to listen to something very quietly usually loses the detail in the treble frequencies, the "air," even if you hear the musical elements in the 2-4kHz range.  So, you use the treble filter to increase the treble frequency in the overall balance, and I bet you can listen at MUCH lower volume with pleasing high frequencies and air this way.

 

I'm sure the flexibility is also useful for different kinds of ears, different musical preferences, etc.  But it occurs to me that the environmental factor is a big one that makes this kind of approach something that could well be a standard for all future IEMs to embrace.

post #335 of 16761

One of these days, I'm going to have to devote more than 3 minutes to the other two filters (I use the balanced filter). Perhaps if there were a V-shaped filter, I would have tried it more extensively by now. Maybe it is the marketing that's throwing me. Shure describes the other filters as "warm" and "bright". I like warm and bright together. I certainly don't want "cold" and "dark". Oh well......

post #336 of 16761
So how is the soundstage on these? I am looking for something with detail but more lushness in the lower end
but most importantly an iem which can create a nice 3d soundstage. my er4s are great for detail and ok for width
but the height and depth just ain't there honey wink.gif
post #337 of 16761
Ha I don't think you can model height and depth with stereo drivers..... wink.gif

Shure should sell additional filters for the se846, with different desired curve results. Seems like that would be a relatively easy thing to do technically? Or is that overkill?


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post #338 of 16761
Quote:
Originally Posted by daniel_hokkaido View Post

So how is the soundstage on these? I am looking for something with detail but more lushness in the lower end
but most importantly an iem which can create a nice 3d soundstage. my er4s are great for detail and ok for width
but the height and depth just ain't there honey wink.gif

The soundstage is both wider and deeper in comparison to my SE535-J or Westone 4r. I believe it was AnakChan that felt that the SE846 has a wider soundstage that even the FitEar TG!334 but lacked the micro detail of the TG!334.

As for the bass, with either the warm or balanced filters it is incredibly visceral and impactful without ever bleeding into the midrange. A far more lush bass than the 4r, 535 or the Sennheiser ie800.
post #339 of 16761
Quote:
Originally Posted by spook76 View Post

As for the bass, with either the warm or balanced filters it is incredibly visceral and impactful without ever bleeding into the midrange. A far more lush bass than the 4r, 535 or the Sennheiser ie800.
Although the W4r, with the right amp & eartips, does a different kind of 'lush bass' that the SE846 can't do. The W4 has this dripping with tone warm midrange, buttery low end pump, and high end silkiness... if you know what you need to do to get it... that the SE846 will not do. The 846 has more range, is more visceral, with a nice sub low when it's in the material, with more clarity & detail. The SE846 is also a lot easier to get to perform to its strengths than the W4r is.
post #340 of 16761
Quote:
Originally Posted by javahut View Post


Although the W4r, with the right amp & eartips, does a different kind of 'lush bass' that the SE846 can't do. The W4 has this dripping with tone warm midrange, buttery low end pump, and high end silkiness... if you know what you need to do to get it... that the SE846 will not do. The 846 has more range, is more visceral, with a nice sub low when it's in the material, with more clarity & detail. The SE846 is also a lot easier to get to perform to its strengths than the W4r is.

 

I didn't appreciate the W4 as much as the SE846. I think the 846 hits more on the musical side of things, while the W4 hits the neutrality side of things.

post #341 of 16761
Quote:
Originally Posted by VisceriousZERO View Post
 

I didn't appreciate the W4 as much as the SE846. I think the 846 hits more on the musical side of things, while the W4 hits the neutrality side of things.

 

The W4 is not neutral sounding. It is far from neutral. I would call it balanced/natural sounding rather than neutral sounding.

post #342 of 16761
Quote:
Originally Posted by uelover View Post
 

 

The W4 is not neutral sounding. It is far from neutral. I would call it balanced/natural sounding rather than neutral sounding.

 

I never listened to it enough I guess xD Sorry.

post #343 of 16761
How can something sound balanced but not neutral?
post #344 of 16761
Anyone have a comparison of se846 vs ocharaku kuro/kaede??
post #345 of 16761
Gesuntheit! wink.gif
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