or Connect
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Portable Headphones, Earphones and In-Ear Monitors › Shure SE846 Impressions Thread
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Shure SE846 Impressions Thread - Page 145

post #2161 of 16761

Anybody know how to get the shure otterbox that comes with 846?

post #2162 of 16761
Quote:
Originally Posted by lescanadiens View Post
 

Anybody know how to get the shure otterbox that comes with 846?

http://www.amazon.com/Shure-EAHRDCASE-CLEAR-Durable-Polishing-Earphones/dp/B00IVPG0Y6/ref=sr_1_4?s=musical-instruments&ie=UTF8&qid=1399274835&sr=1-4&keywords=shure+se846+case

 

The brand is S3CASES by the way :)

post #2163 of 16761

Thank you for your link Joshuachew!

 

Yiks! the price is so crazy!

 

Quote:

post #2164 of 16761

So today I was given the opportunity to swap my Sennheiser IE800 (which looked like they would konk out at any moment due to cable wear) for the Shure SE846s.

 

Now, I do not know who or what possessed me to do it but I went for it, and I would happily have a drink with them!  In the two short hours of ownership I have had shivers go up and down my entire being on more than one occasion with the detail they present.  The difference is tremendous, and it makes me wonder why so many prefer the IE800.

 

Before I get into their sonic characteristics, let me first delve into the design aspect.  At first I thought the IE800s were of a great build standard; the cable issue was easily rectified by resting my iPod (Classic) upon the included carry case inside the pocket of my jeans, they disappeared inconspicuously underneath my golden brown locks and I could, contrary to popular belief, wear them over the ear.  But then something happened.  Over the weeks the heat and humidity of Perth’s summers must have taken its toll on the cable.  It became practically petrified with stiffness.  The resulting difficulties included not being able to attain a good seal in the left ear and general fit troubles all round.  As I say it looked as though cable flux was imminent through no real fault of my own.

 

Yes, the engineers say that they must be worn cable-down yada yada yip yip but the well-documented microphonics left me with no choice but to wear them over-ear.  Hey, it’s at least ten minutes walk to the nearest bus stop (25 minutes on weekends) and I was not prepared to put up with such discomfort.   Moreover, attaining a good seal was nigh on impossible when wearing them cable-down.  The included largest eartips are far too small for my cavernous ears as it is (you could fit an Airbus A380 in there).

But I digress, the 846s’ design is far superior; even fi the cable is not Kevlar reinforced (heck, I would not be surprised if the reaction between Kevlar and perspiration was not healthy for the skin anyway) and it might not be carbon-fibre, but it doesn’t matter.  It is, after all, easily replaced and the difference in sound is negligible.

 

The Shure olives provide a far greater seal and the level of comfort is not too bad (even after prolonged sessions).  A comfortable, secure and refreshingly firm seal is the end result, for which I am a very happy man.  There is no exposed space left underneath the earpiece as was the case with the 800s.  Cable length now means that my pocket is now free for other accoutrements that are often relegated to my backpack (a pain in the preverbial when going out for the evening).

 

I imagine that the 846s are a little more water resistant as well.  Just last week a small droplet of water managed to breach the 800s, thus reducing output by around 80%.  Eventually they dried and sound returned to normal, however this was a massive let down nonetheless.

 

Sound

Forgive me for reiterating what has probably been said many times over (it might help someone performing a Google search anyway – they won’t need to flick through so many pages); it’s on to the good stuff now.

 

As I was able to audition the SE846s at Jaben Audio (Melbourne), I tried both the neutral and bright filters.  I have decided to stick with the bright and this is not likely to change (I am still sceptical about burn-in – I am honestly of the thinking that a lot of it is purely psychological).

 

Bass:  Pronounced, emphatic, detailed, plunges lows not even the road lobby could manage.  Whoever says the IE800s boast greater detailing is kidding themselves.  The detail is there.  Bass is let off the leash somewhat compared to the comparatively restrained 800s; impact is enormous and far more present (when the 800s need to they can be thunderous however in my opinion the thunder is far too few and far between).  Quality and quantity are both delivered here and in spades.  The bright filter does not compromise bass much if at all.  Any bass head should be happy with the Shure SE846.

 

Dubstep (the real kind that was born out of South London – not electro dressed up as dubstep) fans will adore these for the absolutely immense sub-bass.  All electronic music sounds great through the SE846 – due in part to the resonant thump and pop of the kick drum as well as the bassline itself.

 

Mids:  It has to be said that I have been a (once) loyal Sennhesier user for the past four-and-a-half years.  I went from the IE8s (with and without amplification) to the IE800s and thought nothing could top the latter.  How wrong was I?  The reason being is the midrange presence of the Shures, which to date is unlike anything I have ever heard before.

 

I read recently that someone believed male vocals to be off in terms of tonality.  I could not disagree more.  They are, on some tracks, a little recessed for my liking but perhaps that perception will change in time.  Otherwise, male vocals sound, to me, as they should.  Female vocals are just divine.

 

I have never heard guitar, both electric and acoustic, sound sweeter by any means.  Lush and as detailed as an Apple consumer agreement, they really do vie for the starring role ahead of the bass.  In all honesty, as great as the bass is, the mids really do take first spot here.  Metal fans will particularly enjoy the 846s’ sound, for every nuance can be heard.  “The air under the strings” in full effect.  The IE800s fall well short in this department.

 

And you know what else?  Sennheiser never quite got the piano quite right!  The IE800s were dang near close, however it was overcooked and served cold just like any steak you are likely to eat at any given Perth pub.  The piano is among the most beautiful of instruments and should be heard as such.  Anything less just doesn’t cut it.  The 846s, meanwhile, cut it with a Japanese martial artist-cum-sushi chef’s precision.

 

Treble:  Recessed?  Not bright enough?  Not even!  Okay, so the 800s reach that little bit higher however, on reflection, they do so to excess.  The Shure SE846, to my mind, allows the treble to shine in its own way.  Why would you want glitter when really what you want is proper varnish?

 

Soundstage, timbre, instrument separation, attack, decay and musicality:  Let me state this right up front; a wide soundstage Is overrated.  I like it intimate; both the IE800s and SE846s feature a soundstage that suits me perfectly, although the former does render some instruments off to the periphery a little on occasion.  I like it intimate without things becoming claustrophobic.

 

Live recordings do indeed give you that sense of being there; there is no disparity between the 800s and 846s here.  Cheers and screams are palpably real; so much so that the girl who screamed after Bruce Dickenson sang “watching my every move” (“Dance of Death” – En Vivo) had me looking to my right as though the person were there!  Okay, I confess, I am exaggerating a little here, but in no way is the illustration not true.

 

Timbre and musicality is simply without compare.  As mentioned earlier, I have never heard the electric and acoustic guitar sound sweeter. 

 

Upon reflection I honestly found that the IE800s’ attacked far too quickly thereby compromising on overall musicality.  It all sounded much too fast for my liking.  The SE846s set things to cruise control; taking the train through the countryside rather than hooning along the autobahn.  Overly quick attack is not great for detailed recordings either.  Decay does not echo or fade excessively either (further listening will allow me to elaborate on this tricky area in the future).

 

The IE800s really are a solid earphone, but it has to be said that they do not provide enough instrument separation for music to breathe.  The Shures, meanwhio,e are the polar opposite.

 

All this results in the Shure SE846s being that much further ahead than the 800s in terms of real musicality.  The rhythm and beat of any song / track is emphasised that much more and this, for mine, is the absolute tipping point.

 

To illustrate my impressions further, here are a few of the songs I have listened to via the Shures

 

Mike Oldfield:  “Far Above the Clouds” - Tubular Bells III

Wow!  So this is what a tubular bell sounds like!  It rings out with sheer foreboding power.  This is a piece of music that has the sort of complexity that deerves the best headphones.  The IE800s presented this track in a rather aggressive manner; as though it were running out of air to breathe and struggling with arms flailing.  In other words, instrument separation is not afforded.  The SE846s slow things down, inject much needed oxygen and allow complete control and complexion.  Oh and do I hear church bells in the closing passage among the birds singing in the tress?  Who knew?  To date I had not heard this before.

 

Tool:  “10,000 Days (Wings Pt. 2)” – 10,000 Days

Just one bar in and I am in awe.  The nuances are no longer nuances but clear and concise musical details that are as imperative as all else that surrounds them.  Once again, the SE846s’ instrument separation, prominent but extremely well weighted/measured bass and overall presentation allows the piece to breathe clearly; thus making for a truly engaging listen.  Moreover, the thunder throughout the tense build-up sounds scarily real (a beautiful thing as I just love thunder).

 

Machine Head:  “I Am Hell (Sonata in C#) – Unto the Locust

Lord knows that the Sennheiser IE8s failed miserably in making this song (and the album as a whole) sound good.  The IE800s: a marked improvement.  But owing to the constricted presentation of the 800s important elements were drowned out, such as the cymbal clashes that can be heard just before the song hits full throttle.  Once it does, the full ferocity of Dave McLain’s percussion is revealed in the most undeniable fashion imaginable.  Not for the faint of heart.  Those who doubt the trueness to tonality in male vocals need look no further; Robb Flynn’s introductory chanting sounds more haunting than ever, while his chesty growls make their presence known (perhaps not as recessed as once thought – remember these are early impressions – but certainly not as recessed as the IE800 vocals).  Metal is a tricky genre to do well in the high end headphone realm due to its oft high level of distorted sound, however the SE846s do the job with aplomb.

 

Mystica:  “Bliss” (Mystica Mix) – Global Underground #007:  New York (Mixed by Paul Oakenfold)

Oh how I remember listening to this track in a friend’s car back in 2004 through a stereo system that he must have spent thousands on.  With my heart racing, mind and body full of sheer joy, “Bliss” at that time sounded nothing short of heavenly.  Ever since then I have yearned for a headphone that recreated that sense of magic.  Until today, nothing has even come close.  Not even the IE800s.  Try as they might, they simply could not replicate the sound of the kick drum as heard that night.  Don’t get me wrong, the song sounded fantastic through them, but believe me when I say that the Shure SE846s have at long last fulfilled a ten-year long yearning.  The kick drum resonates with a true to club soundsystem thump and pop, while the magic of the Asian inspired melody shines beautifully.  The synths may seem slightly subdued but are really no less present; they do not overtake the musicality as the highs of the IE800s do.

 

Wintersun:  Time (Part 1)

Ladies and gentlemen, I present to you the piste de resistance!  If you enjoy your metal and you own either (hopefully both) the SE846s or the IE800s, acquire this album by any means necessary (barring compressed audio download, of course!).  I could have gone straight to this album for an illustration of how magnificent the 846s are; I chose not to though, because tastes vary and I wanted to save the best til last.

 

On first listen to this album through the IE800s I was blown away by this composition.  Second listen, and things appear a little different.  As I say, this is a massively complex and intricate musical journey that warrants an investment in serious headphones.  It became abundantly clear that the IE800s were not up to the task; try as I might in denying it at the time.  The lack of instrument separation left a great deal of detail wanting.  There is supposed to be a sense of cold as portrayed by this album, but not so cold that it falls victim to frostbite and hypothermia.  The 846s, on the other hand, opens up every missing element magically, just like the first sunrise following an Arctic winter solstice.  Strings ring out magnificently, rhythm and melody take off, subtleties become… __suitable antonym not found__ and absolutely nothing is overshadowed by anything else in spite of a mix that could have used a little more time.  Perhaps best of all the background choir’s vocals sound nothing short of hauntingly magnificent.  This is an album that really does deserve your attention and every bit of adulation.

 

Finally, I cannot stress enough how wonderful the guitar sounds through these things!  Another case in point: Machine Head’s “The Darkness Within”.  One could probably learn to play guitar by ear using these headphones.  Every note and every pluck, stroke and swipe…  Glorious, just glorious.

 

Forgive such a long review.  I never intended for it to be this long but, much like any recent Machine Head song, it transpired as such.  The SE846s have won me over in dramatic, emphatic fashion.  I do feel somehow dirty for abandoning the Sennheiser ship; the Sennheiser IE800s are a ‘phone not to be reckoned with (they kept me happy for five months) however I feel as though the Shure SE846s are superior in areas of musical presentation that matter more than all else.

post #2165 of 16761

Correction:  Heh!  The SE846s' cable is kevlar reinforced as well.  I had no idea.

post #2166 of 16761
Quote:
Originally Posted by Black Label View Post

Correction:  Heh!  The SE846s' cable is kevlar reinforced as well.  I had no idea.

Great review Black Label. Very clear and detailed. smily_headphones1.gif
post #2167 of 16761
Quote:
Originally Posted by lescanadiens View Post
 

Anybody know how to get the shure otterbox that comes with 846?

Also here... and in stock it appears.

 
post #2168 of 16761
Quote:
Originally Posted by Black Label View Post

So today I was given the opportunity to swap my Sennheiser IE800 (which looked like they would konk out at any moment due to cable wear) for the Shure SE846s.



 



Now, I do not know who or what possessed me to do it but I went for it, and I would happily have a drink with them!  In the two short hours of ownership I have had shivers go up and down my entire being on more than one occasion with the detail they present.  The difference is tremendous, and it makes me wonder why so many prefer the IE800.



 



Before I get into their sonic characteristics, let me first delve into the design aspect.  At first I thought the IE800s were of a great build standard; the cable issue was easily rectified by resting my iPod (Classic) upon the included carry case inside the pocket of my jeans, they disappeared inconspicuously underneath my golden brown locks and I could, contrary to popular belief, wear them over the ear.  But then something happened.  Over the weeks the heat and humidity of Perth’s summers must have taken its toll on the cable.  It became practically petrified with stiffness.  The resulting difficulties included not being able to attain a good seal in the left ear and general fit troubles all round.  As I say it looked as though cable flux was imminent through no real fault of my own.



 



Yes, the engineers say that they must be worn cable-down yada yada yip yip but the well-documented microphonics left me with no choice but to wear them over-ear.  Hey, it’s at least ten minutes walk to the nearest bus stop (25 minutes on weekends) and I was not prepared to put up with such discomfort.   Moreover, attaining a good seal was nigh on impossible when wearing them cable-down.  The included largest eartips are far too small for my cavernous ears as it is (you could fit an Airbus A380 in there).



But I digress, the 846s’ design is far superior; even fi the cable is not Kevlar reinforced (heck, I would not be surprised if the reaction between Kevlar and perspiration was not healthy for the skin anyway) and it might not be carbon-fibre, but it doesn’t matter.  It is, after all, easily replaced and the difference in sound is negligible.



 



The Shure olives provide a far greater seal and the level of comfort is not too bad (even after prolonged sessions).  A comfortable, secure and refreshingly firm seal is the end result, for which I am a very happy man.  There is no exposed space left underneath the earpiece as was the case with the 800s.  Cable length now means that my pocket is now free for other accoutrements that are often relegated to my backpack (a pain in the preverbial when going out for the evening).



 



I imagine that the 846s are a little more water resistant as well.  Just last week a small droplet of water managed to breach the 800s, thus reducing output by around 80%.  Eventually they dried and sound returned to normal, however this was a massive let down nonetheless.



 



Sound



Forgive me for reiterating what has probably been said many times over (it might help someone performing a Google search anyway – they won’t need to flick through so many pages); it’s on to the good stuff now.



 



As I was able to audition the SE846s at Jaben Audio (Melbourne), I tried both the neutral and bright filters.  I have decided to stick with the bright and this is not likely to change (I am still sceptical about burn-in – I am honestly of the thinking that a lot of it is purely psychological).



 



Bass:  Pronounced, emphatic, detailed, plunges lows not even the road lobby could manage.  Whoever says the IE800s boast greater detailing is kidding themselves.  The detail is there.  Bass is let off the leash somewhat compared to the comparatively restrained 800s; impact is enormous and far more present (when the 800s need to they can be thunderous however in my opinion the thunder is far too few and far between).  Quality and quantity are both delivered here and in spades.  The bright filter does not compromise bass much if at all.  Any bass head should be happy with the Shure SE846.



 



Dubstep (the real kind that was born out of South London – not electro dressed up as dubstep) fans will adore these for the absolutely immense sub-bass.  All electronic music sounds great through the SE846 – due in part to the resonant thump and pop of the kick drum as well as the bassline itself.



 



Mids:  It has to be said that I have been a (once) loyal Sennhesier user for the past four-and-a-half years.  I went from the IE8s (with and without amplification) to the IE800s and thought nothing could top the latter.  How wrong was I?  The reason being is the midrange presence of the Shures, which to date is unlike anything I have ever heard before.



 



I read recently that someone believed male vocals to be off in terms of tonality.  I could not disagree more.  They are, on some tracks, a little recessed for my liking but perhaps that perception will change in time.  Otherwise, male vocals sound, to me, as they should.  Female vocals are just divine.



 



I have never heard guitar, both electric and acoustic, sound sweeter by any means.  Lush and as detailed as an Apple consumer agreement, they really do vie for the starring role ahead of the bass.  In all honesty, as great as the bass is, the mids really do take first spot here.  Metal fans will particularly enjoy the 846s’ sound, for every nuance can be heard.  “The air under the strings” in full effect.  The IE800s fall well short in this department.



 



And you know what else?  Sennheiser never quite got the piano quite right!  The IE800s were dang near close, however it was overcooked and served cold just like any steak you are likely to eat at any given Perth pub.  The piano is among the most beautiful of instruments and should be heard as such.  Anything less just doesn’t cut it.  The 846s, meanwhile, cut it with a Japanese martial artist-cum-sushi chef’s precision.



 



Treble:  Recessed?  Not bright enough?  Not even!  Okay, so the 800s reach that little bit higher however, on reflection, they do so to excess.  The Shure SE846, to my mind, allows the treble to shine in its own way.  Why would you want glitter when really what you want is proper varnish?



 



Soundstage, timbre, instrument separation, attack, decay and musicality:  Let me state this right up front; a wide soundstage Is overrated.  I like it intimate; both the IE800s and SE846s feature a soundstage that suits me perfectly, although the former does render some instruments off to the periphery a little on occasion.  I like it intimate without things becoming claustrophobic.



 



Live recordings do indeed give you that sense of being there; there is no disparity between the 800s and 846s here.  Cheers and screams are palpably real; so much so that the girl who screamed after Bruce Dickenson sang “watching my every move” (“Dance of Death” – En Vivo) had me looking to my right as though the person were there!  Okay, I confess, I am exaggerating a little here, but in no way is the illustration not true.



 



Timbre and musicality is simply without compare.  As mentioned earlier, I have never heard the electric and acoustic guitar sound sweeter. 



 



Upon reflection I honestly found that the IE800s’ attacked far too quickly thereby compromising on overall musicality.  It all sounded much too fast for my liking.  The SE846s set things to cruise control; taking the train through the countryside rather than hooning along the autobahn.  Overly quick attack is not great for detailed recordings either.  Decay does not echo or fade excessively either (further listening will allow me to elaborate on this tricky area in the future).



 



The IE800s really are a solid earphone, but it has to be said that they do not provide enough instrument separation for music to breathe.  The Shures, meanwhio,e are the polar opposite.



 



All this results in the Shure SE846s being that much further ahead than the 800s in terms of real musicality.  The rhythm and beat of any song / track is emphasised that much more and this, for mine, is the absolute tipping point.



 



To illustrate my impressions further, here are a few of the songs I have listened to via the Shures



 



Mike Oldfield:  “Far Above the Clouds” - Tubular Bells III



Wow!  So this is what a tubular bell sounds like!  It rings out with sheer foreboding power.  This is a piece of music that has the sort of complexity that deerves the best headphones.  The IE800s presented this track in a rather aggressive manner; as though it were running out of air to breathe and struggling with arms flailing.  In other words, instrument separation is not afforded.  The SE846s slow things down, inject much needed oxygen and allow complete control and complexion.  Oh and do I hear church bells in the closing passage among the birds singing in the tress?  Who knew?  To date I had not heard this before.



 



Tool:  “10,000 Days (Wings Pt. 2)” – 10,000 Days



Just one bar in and I am in awe.  The nuances are no longer nuances but clear and concise musical details that are as imperative as all else that surrounds them.  Once again, the SE846s’ instrument separation, prominent but extremely well weighted/measured bass and overall presentation allows the piece to breathe clearly; thus making for a truly engaging listen.  Moreover, the thunder throughout the tense build-up sounds scarily real (a beautiful thing as I just love thunder).



 



Machine Head:  “I Am Hell (Sonata in C#) – Unto the Locust



Lord knows that the Sennheiser IE8s failed miserably in making this song (and the album as a whole) sound good.  The IE800s: a marked improvement.  But owing to the constricted presentation of the 800s important elements were drowned out, such as the cymbal clashes that can be heard just before the song hits full throttle.  Once it does, the full ferocity of Dave McLain’s percussion is revealed in the most undeniable fashion imaginable.  Not for the faint of heart.  Those who doubt the trueness to tonality in male vocals need look no further; Robb Flynn’s introductory chanting sounds more haunting than ever, while his chesty growls make their presence known (perhaps not as recessed as once thought – remember these are early impressions – but certainly not as recessed as the IE800 vocals).  Metal is a tricky genre to do well in the high end headphone realm due to its oft high level of distorted sound, however the SE846s do the job with aplomb.



 



Mystica:  “Bliss” (Mystica Mix) – Global Underground #007:  New York (Mixed by Paul Oakenfold)



Oh how I remember listening to this track in a friend’s car back in 2004 through a stereo system that he must have spent thousands on.  With my heart racing, mind and body full of sheer joy, “Bliss” at that time sounded nothing short of heavenly.  Ever since then I have yearned for a headphone that recreated that sense of magic.  Until today, nothing has even come close.  Not even the IE800s.  Try as they might, they simply could not replicate the sound of the kick drum as heard that night.  Don’t get me wrong, the song sounded fantastic through them, but believe me when I say that the Shure SE846s have at long last fulfilled a ten-year long yearning.  The kick drum resonates with a true to club soundsystem thump and pop, while the magic of the Asian inspired melody shines beautifully.  The synths may seem slightly subdued but are really no less present; they do not overtake the musicality as the highs of the IE800s do.



 



Wintersun:  Time (Part 1)



Ladies and gentlemen, I present to you the piste de resistance!  If you enjoy your metal and you own either (hopefully both) the SE846s or the IE800s, acquire this album by any means necessary (barring compressed audio download, of course!).  I could have gone straight to this album for an illustration of how magnificent the 846s are; I chose not to though, because tastes vary and I wanted to save the best til last.



 



On first listen to this album through the IE800s I was blown away by this composition.  Second listen, and things appear a little different.  As I say, this is a massively complex and intricate musical journey that warrants an investment in serious headphones.  It became abundantly clear that the IE800s were not up to the task; try as I might in denying it at the time.  The lack of instrument separation left a great deal of detail wanting.  There is supposed to be a sense of cold as portrayed by this album, but not so cold that it falls victim to frostbite and hypothermia.  The 846s, on the other hand, opens up every missing element magically, just like the first sunrise following an Arctic winter solstice.  Strings ring out magnificently, rhythm and melody take off, subtleties become… __suitable antonym not found__ and absolutely nothing is overshadowed by anything else in spite of a mix that could have used a little more time.  Perhaps best of all the background choir’s vocals sound nothing short of hauntingly magnificent.  This is an album that really does deserve your attention and every bit of adulation.



 



Finally, I cannot stress enough how wonderful the guitar sounds through these things!  Another case in point: Machine Head’s “The Darkness Within”.  One could probably learn to play guitar by ear using these headphones.  Every note and every pluck, stroke and swipe…  Glorious, just glorious.



 



Forgive such a long review.  I never intended for it to be this long but, much like any recent Machine Head song, it transpired as such.  The SE846s have won me over in dramatic, emphatic fashion.  I do feel somehow dirty for abandoning the Sennheiser ship; the Sennheiser IE800s are a ‘phone not to be reckoned with (they kept me happy for five months) however I feel as though the Shure SE846s are superior in areas of musical presentation that matter more than all else.



Good review!
+1 on most points👍
post #2169 of 16761
Thank you Del.
Really appreciate the info :-)
post #2170 of 16761
Black Label,
Thank you for the enthusiastic review.
Really enjoy reading yours!
post #2171 of 16761

Great review Black label! - I got a thumbs up for it.

post #2172 of 16761

Thank you the review. I fully agree with your observations on male and female voice. The male voice has some hollowness to it. I hope this is a stock cable issue. I ordered a pair of Furutech cables for them. I enjoy them with orchestra music, the dynamic is just awesome! No restiction! You hit the nail in the head about piano, the SE846 is the best I heard so far on this one. But, like I said before, Westone has the little edge on human voice so far to me, but the rest SE846 do better.

post #2173 of 16761
When detaching the cable I just pull and it'll snap off right? And to plug it back in it'll snap back?
post #2174 of 16761
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brokenlax View Post

When detaching the cable I just pull and it'll snap off right? And to plug it back in it'll snap back?

Yes it should be. But also clean the contacts with deoxit gold make it much easier next time

post #2175 of 16761
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seamaster View Post

Yes it should be. But also clean the contacts with deoxit gold make it much easier next time

Not to correct but you clean the contacts with Deoxit Red and then use a little Deoxit Gold to improve the contacts.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Portable Headphones, Earphones and In-Ear Monitors › Shure SE846 Impressions Thread