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A new drug that can restore hair cells in the cochlea

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

http://scitechdaily.com/researchers-restore-hearing-to-noise-damaged-ears/

 

How long before this will be available medically? redface.gif

post #2 of 10

the unit of measure is probably decades for a approved human treatment from this research

post #3 of 10

Hmm, their experimental procedure seems a bit hairy to me.

 

wink.gif

 

Cheers

post #4 of 10
I can hear like a bat now
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But I have hair on my _____ frown.gif
post #5 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcx View Post

the unit of measure is probably decades for a approved human treatment from this research

Perfect.  In a few decades, I'm going to need it.

post #6 of 10

This discovery is a very long ways away from human therapeutics or even human trials. The researchers have merely shown positive results in the murine model.

 

LY411575's mechanism of action of cleaving the Notch intracellular domain, subsequently upregulating Atoh1, and thereby re-inducing hair cell differentiation works, but there is a long way to go in determining the drug's efficacy, safety, therapeutic window, etc. If or when a drug that promotes hair cell differentiation actually proceeds with FDA testing, LY411575 likely won't be the actual drug, as there should be differences in the affinity of a y-secretase inhibitor to the Notch intracellular domain between mice and humans. There should also be more elegant methods for Notch inhibition, and perhaps direct Atoh1 upregulation.

 

This is only one of several ways researchers have investigated in inducing Atoh1-driven hair cell differentiation; it happens to be the first one that works to an appreciable degree, but it doesn't mean the other methods can't work better in another time or within another experimental protocol.

post #7 of 10
Quote:

LY411575 likely won't be the actual drug, as there should be differences in the affinity of a y-secretase inhibitor to the Notch intracellular domain between mice and humans

I was thinking exactly the same. That y-secretase inhibitor is a bugger isn't it.confused_face.gif

post #8 of 10

Another thread at Headfi already mentioned that research and the compound(s):

http://www.head-fi.org/t/645929/tinninitus-ringing-ears-or-hearing-impaired-look-here

 

I would not be surprised if it takes a decade for a drug to stem from that research. Even if you have an active compound that can reverse animal hearing loss in a preclinical study, there are still tons of obstacles to overcome before FDA approval (e.g., human toxicity, efficacy, bioavailability, pharmacokinetics, ect).

 

The best way to preserve your hearing is listening at low volume. If you already have hearing problems/tinitus/ringing, taking moderate amount of folate and vitamin B12 may help. 


Edited by zzffnn - 8/7/13 at 11:33am
post #9 of 10
Thread Starter 

I have bad hearing in my right ear because one of my teeth was sucked in while growing while I was a kid. This caused my jaw to close slightly shifted over so the teeth would still fit together. This shift in the jaw put pressure in my eustachian tube, preventing it from flowing properly. I had middle ear infections in my right ear three times growing up with tubes installed twice. It's all cleared up now but my hearing is noticeably worse in that ear. Do you possibly know ways I can improve hearing in this case? Maybe my eardrums are scarred from the tubes being put in multiple times? Maybe the fluid that filled my middle ear coated my stapes/anvil and dried up on it? It's a shot in the dark to find help for this, but I'm always blown away by the marvels that doctors work out.

post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by astro View Post

I have bad hearing in my right ear because one of my teeth was sucked in while growing while I was a kid. This caused my jaw to close slightly shifted over so the teeth would still fit together. This shift in the jaw put pressure in my eustachian tube, preventing it from flowing properly. I had middle ear infections in my right ear three times growing up with tubes installed twice. It's all cleared up now but my hearing is noticeably worse in that ear. Do you possibly know ways I can improve hearing in this case? Maybe my eardrums are scarred from the tubes being put in multiple times? Maybe the fluid that filled my middle ear coated my stapes/anvil and dried up on it? It's a shot in the dark to find help for this, but I'm always blown away by the marvels that doctors work out.

Sorry, I cannot help much in your specific case as I am not an ear doctor. What you have seems to be a mechanical/structural condition, which may not be signifcantly improved by folate or B12.

Maybe try to avoid ear infection. I would recommend: 1) carefully take out any water introduced by bath or swimming; 2) use clean new tips with your IEMs (clean tips with hydrogen peroxide daily and dry them before use).

You may also contact the researchers in that article, state your condition and ask if they can recommend something.

Slightly out of topic: There are media players that offer left/right balance control (you can make right channel louder than left), such as Fiio X3. But I would be extra careful with turning up the volume.
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