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HELP accidentally played full volume did I kill my new headphones? - Page 2

post #16 of 25

Your headphones can't be damaged unless they were faulty to begin with or Denon lies about their headphone's power handling capabilities (doubtful, at least that they would be off by a factor of 10). See the explanation here.

 

Cheers
 


Edited by ab initio - 7/25/13 at 9:20pm
post #17 of 25

Just a word to say that business conditions and dealing with the public seem to be different in the US than in the UK. Under the laws in this country you only have a very short time to return the goods and they must be in pristine condition with original wrappings. If returned after a certain time a repair or reconditioned item must be accepted. ANY dispute as to the user causing accidental damage  of ANY sort a FULL charge will be applied. It is also up to the buyer[after the first short period] in any dispute with the seller/manufacturer to PROVE that the component has a "built in" design or component fault.. Requiring the buyer to get specialist     [approved] advice that this is a GENUINE fault -at  the BUYERS expense. If it can be proved [after getting advice] that it is the makers fault then all expenses will be recovered . But ONLY if it can be proved. This takes a while to do.

post #18 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by duncan1 View Post

Just a word to say that business conditions and dealing with the public seem to be different in the US than in the UK. Under the laws in this country you only have a very short time to return the goods and they must be in pristine condition with original wrappings. If returned after a certain time a repair or reconditioned item must be accepted. ANY dispute as to the user causing accidental damage  of ANY sort a FULL charge will be applied. It is also up to the buyer[after the first short period] in any dispute with the seller/manufacturer to PROVE that the component has a "built in" design or component fault.. Requiring the buyer to get specialist     [approved] advice that this is a GENUINE fault -at  the BUYERS expense. If it can be proved [after getting advice] that it is the makers fault then all expenses will be recovered . But ONLY if it can be proved. This takes a while to do.
I think that bin the US you don't have to do all of that. In Australia you certainly don't!
post #19 of 25

Power handling tells you when the drivers will burn out; it doesn't mention if a sudden blast at high volumes will or will not damage the voice coil's shape, causing a change in the dynamic drivers's diaphragm movement.

 

Besides, such tests are generally conducted in a way where they feed power progressively. Not the same case at all.

 

If the pads on those Denons are removable (and able to be placed back), try removing them and see if you are able to take a peek at the drivers.


Edited by kalbee - 7/26/13 at 7:43am
post #20 of 25

The public in the UK are not held in such high regard as in the US and I take it Australia.The class system is STILL well in force no matter who denies it. --Lowest=working class[the poor and not well off]-2=middle class got a good job and have no trouble paying their mortgage-3- the rich= made a lot of money working hard in business-4-the high class=dukes/earls/countesses/lords/ladies-5-royalty -whom the high class worship-kings/queens. The UK  has never changed from that and never will. The working class are as we speak being reverted back to serfs by Cameron.Did you notice that Obama "did away with the "working class" now they are called==middle class-Why- because it sounds to "left-wing"/commie/etc.does it make a difference to your life being called middle class ? not financially as those loosing their homes will tell you. ---What I am trying to point out is the different approach by different countries and no I am not a "commie" used to run a business. but I can "feel" for the poor.

post #21 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by duncan1 View Post

What I am trying to point out is the different approach by different countries and no I am not a "commie" used to run a business. but I can "feel" for the poor.

That's fine, and also a good thing to share. I for one learned something.

 

As far as I've read---which means I could have simply missed it---, the OP didn't specify where he was from. Since a big bulk of the folks on Head-Fi are American, I tend to treat everyone without a location name as living in the US or with similar (business) customs as them.

post #22 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by kalbee View Post

Power handling tells you when the drivers will burn out; it doesn't mention if a sudden blast at high volumes will or will not damage the voice coil's shape, causing a change in the dynamic drivers's diaphragm movement.

 

Besides, such tests are generally conducted in a way where they feed power progressively. Not the same case at all.

 

If the pads on those Denons are removable (and able to be placed back), try removing them and see if you are able to take a peek at the drivers.


This is incorrect. The Denons can handle sustained 1.8 Watts and that at the very worst, the E10 could pump out 0.2Watts. Remember, power is related to the voltage and current being sourced by the amplifier and that voltage and current are directly related.

P = V^2 / R = I^2 * R

V = I * R

 

My previous post shows how the E10 is physically incapable of producing any audio waveform that can exceed the specification for damage. The E10 simply cannot muster the voltages. Equivalently: the E10 simply cannot muster the current. Equivalently: the E10 simply cannot muster the power.

 

Cheers

post #23 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by ab initio View Post


This is incorrect. The Denons can handle sustained 1.8 Watts and that at the very worst, the E10 could pump out 0.2Watts. Remember, power is related to the voltage and current being sourced by the amplifier and that voltage and current are directly related.

P = V^2 / R = I^2 * R

V = I * R

 

My previous post shows how the E10 is physically incapable of producing any audio waveform that can exceed the specification for damage. The E10 simply cannot muster the voltages. Equivalently: the E10 simply cannot muster the current. Equivalently: the E10 simply cannot muster the power.

 

Cheers

Whelp.

If you're only to continue talking about the specified max loads then carry on. I'll just move away.

You're missing half the picture.

 

 

@OP:

Are you able to demo a pair of the same headphones at a local store or via another local member? If there is no way to otherwise verify if your headphones are indeed damaged from the accident, you should compare it with another pair for best results. If they are indeed damaged, if the ebay seller was an authorized seller then you may be able to use the warranty for a repair. Otherwise you should still be able to get it repaired although it won't be free.

post #24 of 25
So if both sides sound the same, and one isn't off, they are fine.


Chances of damaging both sides with that little voltage are slim to none. Your headphones are fine.

When a driver goes bad is isn't a slightly changes sound signature, it's gonna be totally noticable.
post #25 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by kalbee View Post

Whelp.

If you're only to continue talking about the specified max loads then carry on. I'll just move away.

You're missing half the picture.

 

 

@OP:

Are you able to demo a pair of the same headphones at a local store or via another local member? If there is no way to otherwise verify if your headphones are indeed damaged from the accident, you should compare it with another pair for best results. If they are indeed damaged, if the ebay seller was an authorized seller then you may be able to use the warranty for a repair. Otherwise you should still be able to get it repaired although it won't be free.


The E10 cannot muster an impulse that can damage the headphones.

Damage thresholds are usually given as RMS values---the instantaneous power can exceed the RMS value, especially during transients; however headphones and all other speaker drivers are designed to handle those.

Because the audio waveform is limited to finite amplitude (by voltage rails on the amplifier) there is no impulse that the E10 can generate that can damage the headphones unless the headphones were defective to begin with.

 

Hope this clears up the misunderstanding,

Cheers!

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