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Is it possible to record or capture Netflix video streaming?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

I am curious to find out how would one be able to record or capture Netflix video streaming. Of course, if anyone knows how to capture Netflix live streaming I would definitely love to hear their thoughts on this matter.I have read somewhere that you would need a Netflix Video Downloader for this job, but since I am not an expert in computers I would like to hear some advice from someone who has experience with this sort of things.

Cheers!

post #2 of 10

Audials Moviebox is one of the Windows applications which are able to record and convert video streams from Netflix and other similar online streaming video platforms .
you will find a tutorial on how yo record netflix videos if you follow this link:

http://audials.com/en/how_to_record_stream_capture_music_videos_movies_from/netflix.html

It's a software which I think is worth taking a look at because for me it does a good job whenever I need to download a video from the internet.
 

post #3 of 10

FYI that's not at all legal.

post #4 of 10

Audials softawre  is legal and complies with Copyright Laws, as long as you don't redistribute the recorded songs to other people. Copyright Laws state that " When recording or converting media, please do not redistribute it to other people.“ So you can rest assured to download and use this program.                                                                          

post #5 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by veresben View Post

Audials softawre  is legal and complies with Copyright Laws, as long as you don't redistribute the recorded songs to other people. Copyright Laws state that " When recording or converting media, please do not redistribute it to other people.“ So you can rest assured to download and use this program.                                                                          

The software itself is legal but recording Netflix videos isn't a legal way to use it. When signing up for Netflix you sign a contract saying you're not going to do that.

post #6 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by chewy4 View Post

The software itself is legal but recording Netflix videos isn't a legal way to use it. When signing up for Netflix you sign a contract saying you're not going to do that.

+1

It might be considered fair use to capture part of a video for educational purposes (if you are a teacher needing to show a clip in class). I don't believe terms of use contracts can rescind fair use rights.

But otherwise, it is a violation of copyright law whether or not Netflix has it in their terms of use.
post #7 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by cel4145 View Post
 I don't believe terms of use contracts can rescind fair use rights.

 

This is curious. Fair use isn't a right - it's a set of exceptions to the copyright holders' rights. I don't know how the Netflix ToS handles this, as the real issue is of course the copyright (held by someone else, not Netflix). Likely their ToS is more a description of the license (itself a very specific set of guidelines for how copyright is handled), but I don't know that if there was some sort of specific contractual obligation not to record as set by Netflix (which, itself would certainly require very specific licensing on their end) if fair use would go beyond that. I'm not sure I thought that out in a very logical manner, but it's an interesting thing to think about.

 

Regardless, +1s all around to the statements that this is quite illegal.

post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by brhfl View Post

This is curious. Fair use isn't a right - it's a set of exceptions to the copyright holders' rights.

See, I think of copyright holder's rights as a limited monopoly granted "to promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries." So copyright is an exception to the public's rights from my perspective, and thus fair use is a right smily_headphones1.gif

But yeah. Not just copying Netflix streams, but also copying streaming audio and/or video from YouTube is illegal.
post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by cel4145 View Post


See, I think of copyright holder's rights as a limited monopoly granted "to promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries." So copyright is an exception to the public's rights from my perspective, and thus fair use is a right smily_headphones1.gif

But yeah. Not just copying Netflix streams, but also copying streaming audio and/or video from YouTube is illegal.

From a more philosophical standpoint, I'm right there with you. But legally, copyright is a set of exclusive rights that one has over their content. The ability to allow or deny all sorts of handlings of said content. And fair use is simply a set of guidelines that hopefully maybe will allow you to squeak past someone else's rights, for the right (heh) reasons. Is it picking nits to break it down in such a way? Yes, but I think it's important as people tend to think that fair use is some really great and powerful protection they're offered, when in reality it seems a weak and fragile doctrine, and one that I never hope to have to stand up for myself. The way it should be? No... but, then, what is...

 

It will be interesting to see how these things continue to play out, as you mentioned YouTube and the like... Netflix uses Microsoft's VC-1 codec and PlayReady DRM. Breaking DRM is a whole 'nother legal challenge. But YouTube, and a lot of other content is sent 'in the clear,' so to speak, and cached (downloaded) on the user's machine anyway. Obviously recovering and saving these files violates a license, but... a lot of copyright related issues sure seem to be built from houses of cards these days...

post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by brhfl View Post

From a more philosophical standpoint, I'm right there with you. But legally, copyright is a set of exclusive rights that one has over their content. The ability to allow or deny all sorts of handlings of said content. And fair use is simply a set of guidelines that hopefully maybe will allow you to squeak past someone else's rights, for the right (heh) reasons. Is it picking nits to break it down in such a way? Yes, but I think it's important as people tend to think that fair use is some really great and powerful protection they're offered, when in reality it seems a weak and fragile doctrine, and one that I never hope to have to stand up for myself. The way it should be? No... but, then, what is...

It will be interesting to see how these things continue to play out, as you mentioned YouTube and the like... Netflix uses Microsoft's VC-1 codec and PlayReady DRM. Breaking DRM is a whole 'nother legal challenge. But YouTube, and a lot of other content is sent 'in the clear,' so to speak, and cached (downloaded) on the user's machine anyway. Obviously recovering and saving these files violates a license, but... a lot of copyright related issues sure seem to be built from houses of cards these days...

We are probably getting off topic a little, but it does seem related to this thread smily_headphones1.gif

I agree that people tend to not understand the fair use exemptions, and likely don't know the case law that supports some uses. An even bigger problem is that media companies are more than willing to sue. I love the example Lessig gives in Free Culture of the documentary film maker, fair use, and Fox media. I heard Lessig speak about this issue in general, and he said it just doesn't matter whether one is clearly right or not when it comes to fair use because most people are not able or willing to spend $100,000 to assert those rights in a fight against a corporation.

For those doing expensive projects that will be public or commercial projects that will be sold that depend on copyrighted content, definitely better to be safe than sorry.

And yes. DMCA violations are a whole different problem.
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