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post #16 of 68
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by PurpleAngel View Post

You are 100% correct, the Philips is a receiver, my point was that most people in an audio/video forum would think in terms of your audio setup as an older "5.1 home audio system" or older "HTiB" (Home theater in a Box) and using those terms would help those on the forum better understand your audio setup.

 

One problem is that your Philips receiver powers the sub-woofer, chances are any separate receiver you buy will not come with the ability to power the sub-woofer, most receivers send a signal to a self powered sub-woofer.

So you would have to buy a separate sub-woofer with whatever receiver you choose to get.

 

Personally I would not buy a Sony receiver, part of the price your paying is for the Sony name.

A decent chuck of the cash you pay for the Sony goes towards Sony's marketing department, not the cost of building the amplifiers inside the Sony receiver. I'm sure the Sony would make a very decent receiver for it's price.

But I would would think a company dedicated to audio (like Denon) might offer a little better sound quality, for the price.

Off hand I do not know enough about each Denon receiver to make a recommendation

I own a Yamaha receiver (RX-V671) and I would have no problem buying Pioneer.

 

Chances are a that a CS4398 DAC chip is going be better then whatever is in the Philips (or the motherboard), so at least for $65-$80 (per sound card), you should notice an improvement in audio quality.

 

Thanks. I didn't think of what others may think it to be rather than what it is but a clarification probably would have helped. I actually bought it back then for the optical input and speaker design. I was pleased to find that the speakers were of high quality and even more surprised that the analog inputs have a use even now.

 

Thanks for the input on the subwoofer. I actually do have another active sub woofer from what was a htib so that's not a problem.

 

Although their prices are usually inflated for the brand name, I mentioned Sony 7.1 Receiver STR-DH520 as there is a new one on sale locally with 33% below the price on Amazon which seems good. I personally like Yamaha myself too but unfortunately they are not on sale and I'm not sure the extra expense would be worth it given what I have. Do you think the Sony's worth it given the discount and what I have or would you still recommend a sound card?

post #17 of 68
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cel4145 View Post

I agree with Purple Angel. Your Philips receiver is an HTIB receiver, and it's a Philips. They are not considered a top AVR manufacturer. Sony is not well thought of, either, although there was one model last year that seemed to get some good reviews from audio video enthusiasts for a budget level receiver (sorry, I don't remember the model number).

Check out the Denon AVR-1613 from Accessories4less.com. The previous year's model, the 1612, got a stellar review, and I would expect the 1613 to perform as well since it's basically the same receiver with a few feature changes. Using the enclosed microphone with it, you'll be able to run Audyssey MultEQ, which will set the timing and channel levels for the speakers and sub AND also EQ your setup to provide a smoother in room response.

 

Lets hope it was the Sony STR-DH520 as a local store is clearing out last years stock and they have a new one for 33% less than what it's sold on Amazon for now.

They also had the Denon AVR1513 for even less than the Sony but its sold out.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by cel4145 View Post

Also, if you want brand new, the Denon AVR-1713 is on sale at B&H Photo for $314. A step up from the 1613 with an additional HDMI input and the better Audyssey MultEQ XT room correction version.

The Netwoking, Room Correction, Zone 2 and additional HDMI ports are not something I'd put to use so I'd stick to the lower models. The Sony has 7.1 which might be a little more useful for me. Does the STR-DH520 sound familiar at all?

 

It's amazing how a simple HDMI vs Analog can get so complicated. But thanks for the recommendations.

post #18 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by lemm View Post

The Netwoking, Room Correction, Zone 2 and additional HDMI ports are not something I'd put to use so I'd stick to the lower models. The Sony has 7.1 which might be a little more useful for me. Does the STR-DH520 sound familiar at all?

Are you experienced with Audyssey MultEQ? If nothing else, the microphone will set the channel level and speaker distance correctly even if you don't enable Audyssey. But room acoustics are such a big factor in speaker SQ, that Audyssey is usually a big plus. Particularly since it will help correct the sub output (most other room correction software does not). Subs frequency response is usually highly affected by the room and almost always need EQ help.

Like I said. I don't know which Sony model it was. You might try researching that one. AVS is the place I would have read it.
post #19 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by lemm View Post

Yes of course, I just meant it's discrete 6ch analog input rather than the common dolby pro logic of the time. I checked the motherboard output and it supports up to 24/192 which I guess would avoid any down-sampling etc. of current HD standards in bluray and games so in terms of a a clean analog path the current setup is still similar to HDMI. Surprising really given it's from before HD audio and bluray became the talking points on forums like this.

 

 

Just to add - the bit rate is not the same as HD Audio encoding. Yes, they're at 24/96 minimum, but there a lot of other things in there that are more dependent on the processor before the DAC than what that DAC can go up to in terms of bit depth and sample rate. For example, entry level receivers from six years ago are 24/96 compatible, but not all of them can decode HDCD or DTS MA-HD (Master Audio HD). Nowadays I think most of them can, but there are other encoding formats (that aren't even available on many BluRays you can get on most stores) coming out. That's actually the frustrating part with HT - why they don't release them in separate preamp-processor and amplifier modules (that way you don't trasha receiver with a good amp ten years later) at more affordable prices than Rotel is baffling. Then again, there's Emotiva now and you can get those separates for $1000 total plus shipping.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by lemm View Post

I was almost hoping for a more definitive reply like 'yes, your ancient receiver can in no way compare to current receivers' or 'a new soundcard will be miles better than motherboard audio' but I guess it's not that easy.

 

 

Yes, even the listener is a factor, even if we're all into audio. In some cases it's placebo, in other cases there really are nuances in music (maybe even in SFX) that are better through some other equipment that others don't pay attention to. Of course, the most obvious will be my family being impressed by a simple surround system (wow, it's coming from everywhere!) vs my musician friends (whoa! i heard that bullet like it came from behind that wall spatially, but not tonally!) Of course, when we're playing games, SQ matters a lot less since our attention span is on the screen, keyboard and mouse (or gamepad), so that's one thing you should try out if you can get your hands on another receiver. Actually, in many games, the sound matters less than what we see, since we either get killed by a sniper or we see the tracer bullets or barrel flash to know where the heck the shots are coming from (or maybe we haven't had the best surround systems to get used to it). In racing games, I have a great benefit out of it - I can remove the radar on the screen and rely on my ears, as I can hear what's coming up behind me (and usually I can tell the difference between a Porsche Flat 6 and a Corvette V8, even if I'm in an NSX with a V6). When racing games were any more realistic, however, the radar would be a better choice - at that speed I don't see the flags at the main straight telling me to let the car behind me pass because he's several laps ahead already.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by lemm View Post

 

It would of course by ideal to go into a shop and get decent current generation receiver and soundcard for comparison. However I'm not sure it's that simple for working items. Generally shops would require a fault for used items and only refund unused goods. Hence the questions here.

 

 

Whoops, my bad - the blank location info on your post had me assuming you're in North America where consumers are protected to a fault (like some ********* walking into Wal Mart after a three-day weekend with an obviously used tent that they're returning, and essentially just rented for the price of the repacking fee, which is a lot lower than an actual rental). On the upside, if you have smaller audio retailers (ie, not chain electronics stores) near you, see if you can try your speakers with their receiver and yours back to back. It's not 100% ideal for a comparo (which would be to bring home the receiver), but it's better than buying deaf (ie, blind) and not being able to return the item.


Edited by ProtegeManiac - 7/7/13 at 8:37pm
post #20 of 68
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cel4145 View Post


Are you experienced with Audyssey MultEQ? If nothing else, the microphone will set the channel level and speaker distance correctly even if you don't enable Audyssey. But room acoustics are such a big factor in speaker SQ, that Audyssey is usually a big plus. Particularly since it will help correct the sub output (most other room correction software does not). Subs frequency response is usually highly affected by the room and almost always need EQ help.

Like I said. I don't know which Sony model it was. You might try researching that one. AVS is the place I would have read it.

I was thinking I might go get the Sony today. It apparently has it's own room correction setup but not Audyssey MultEQ like on the Denon you suggested. Although the feedback on the sound quality was largely positive, there seemed to be a number of comments regarding some faults. May just have been some unfortunate owners that got a faulty item but it left me a bit less enthusiastic to make the journey today and didn't mind leaving it perhaps for another day. Plus I woke up far too late.

 

As for the Audyssey MultEQ, although I see some benefits of having such room correction features, the reason I would perhaps not regard it as essential for myself is because my speaker placement would be quite equa-distant and I assume I could always adjust the channel levels etc. via PC software as it would be for PC use. But I've not used Audyssey MultEQ to know of all it's functions.

post #21 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by lemm View Post

I was thinking I might go get the Sony today. It apparently has it's own room correction setup but not Audyssey MultEQ like on the Denon you suggested. Although the feedback on the sound quality was largely positive, there seemed to be a number of comments regarding some faults. May just have been some unfortunate owners that got a faulty item but it left me a bit less enthusiastic to make the journey today and didn't mind leaving it perhaps for another day. Plus I woke up far too late.

 

As for the Audyssey MultEQ, although I see some benefits of having such room correction features, the reason I would perhaps not regard it as essential for myself is because my speaker placement would be quite equa-distant and I assume I could always adjust the channel levels etc. via PC software as it would be for PC use. But I've not used Audyssey MultEQ to know of all it's functions.

When you do the settings for the Sony receiver, it should display on the TV or monitor you have hooked up to the Sony.

post #22 of 68
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ProtegeManiac View Post

Just to add - the bit rate is not the same as HD Audio encoding. Yes, they're at 24/96 minimum, but there a lot of other things in there that are more dependent on the processor before the DAC than what that DAC can go up to in terms of bit depth and sample rate. For example, entry level receivers from six years ago are 24/96 compatible, but not all of them can decode HDCD or DTS MA-HD (Master Audio HD). Nowadays I think most of them can, but there are other encoding formats (that aren't even available on many BluRays you can get on most stores) coming out. That's actually the frustrating part with HT - why they don't release them in separate preamp-processor and amplifier modules (that way you don't trasha receiver with a good amp ten years later) at more affordable prices than Rotel is baffling. Then again, there's Emotiva now and you can get those separates for $1000 total plus shipping.

I'm glad I kept that receiver. All the others I had are not able to handle current HD audio but this rare one with multi channel analog inputs from before bluray and HDMI was even heard of is still useable. I'm assuming decoding isn't a problem as DTS HD-MA etc would be decoded by the PC and sent through the analog cables rather than bitstreamed over HDMI. This would result in the same 24/96 quality right? Or would bluray do something silly like not allow the full HD 24/96 audio to be sent when using analog and instead only send the DTS Core because it's not being HDMI bitstreamed using HDCP?

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ProtegeManiac View Post

Yes, even the listener is a factor, even if we're all into audio. In some cases it's placebo, in other cases there really are nuances in music (maybe even in SFX) that are better through some other equipment that others don't pay attention to. Of course, the most obvious will be my family being impressed by a simple surround system (wow, it's coming from everywhere!) vs my musician friends (whoa! i heard that bullet like it came from behind that wall spatially, but not tonally!) Of course, when we're playing games, SQ matters a lot less since our attention span is on the screen, keyboard and mouse (or gamepad), so that's one thing you should try out if you can get your hands on another receiver. Actually, in many games, the sound matters less than what we see, since we either get killed by a sniper or we see the tracer bullets or barrel flash to know where the heck the shots are coming from (or maybe we haven't had the best surround systems to get used to it). In racing games, I have a great benefit out of it - I can remove the radar on the screen and rely on my ears, as I can hear what's coming up behind me (and usually I can tell the difference between a Porsche Flat 6 and a Corvette V8, even if I'm in an NSX with a V6). When racing games were any more realistic, however, the radar would be a better choice - at that speed I don't see the flags at the main straight telling me to let the car behind me pass because he's several laps ahead already.

One of it's uses will be for gaming. I haven't even attached all my speakers yet and compared the two sets I have to see if there's a vast difference between them or if I even need to upgrade the receiver. They still sound fine to me. But the need for a good DDL soundcard (recommendations welcome) grew into whether it would be best to get a more expensive analog soundcard or new HDMI receiver, and whether either would significantly improve overall audio quality.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ProtegeManiac View Post

Whoops, my bad - the blank location info on your post had me assuming you're in North America where consumers are protected to a fault (like some ********* walking into Wal Mart after a three-day weekend with an obviously used tent that they're returning, and essentially just rented for the price of the repacking fee, which is a lot lower than an actual rental). On the upside, if you have smaller audio retailers (ie, not chain electronics stores) near you, see if you can try your speakers with their receiver and yours back to back. It's not 100% ideal for a comparo (which would be to bring home the receiver), but it's better than buying deaf (ie, blind) and not being able to return the item.

Would be nice if one could do that. Nothing beats a real comparison. But then I'd be testing multiple receivers, multiple speakers and multiple soundcards which I doubt would be possible. That's why I'm here instead.

post #23 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by lemm View Post

. . . I assume I could always adjust the channel levels etc. via PC software as it would be for PC use. But I've not used Audyssey MultEQ to know of all it's functions.

Yeah. I'm not sure whether adjusting channel levels is possible via the HDMI output. The channel and delay adjustments are actually standard features on most AVRs. Here's what Audyssey does.
post #24 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by lemm View Post

I'm assuming decoding isn't a problem as DTS HD-MA etc would be decoded by the PC and sent through the analog cables rather than bitstreamed over HDMI. This would result in the same 24/96 quality right? Or would bluray do something silly like not allow the full HD 24/96 audio to be sent when using analog and instead only send the DTS Core because it's not being HDMI bitstreamed using HDCP?

 

That all depends on what the on-board soundcard is compatible with. IF it's compatible with it, then it will decode DTA MA-HD with no downsampling, and if there are any degradations to the signal past that, it can be from any weak points in the design of the analog output section, and maybe from the cables used from the analog transmission (this of course is much less audible, and for far less money, than some audiophiles claim). If for example it isn't compatible, a BluRay (DVD, HD-DVD) movie has several audio tracks and it will read whichever is, same thing with most games although of course the BluRay has all audio pre-recorded and the game is just processing it (not necessarily the exact same formats, but then the game will likely downsample what it outputs, as best I understand how they work).

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by lemm View Post

One of it's uses will be for gaming. I haven't even attached all my speakers yet and compared the two sets I have to see if there's a vast difference between them or if I even need to upgrade the receiver. They still sound fine to me. But the need for a good DDL soundcard (recommendations welcome) grew into whether it would be best to get a more expensive analog soundcard or new HDMI receiver, and whether either would significantly improve overall audio quality.

 

I'm still likely to go for the HDMI receiver than the soundcard, for the reasons already stated, as well as the need to maybe get a separate surge protector or even voltage regulator/UPS for it will be offset by not having a soundcard add to the case, which brings with it heat and adds another obstacle to the airflow. But then again, that might not be a problem is you're using a full-size tower - I'm more of an small tower/SFF guy so space inside the chassis is a premium. Even if I had a receiver and makes for, overall, a larger area for all the gear, it's because I'm not likely to run the receiver at all times anyways, so in soem cases I can make do with a $50 (on sale) headphone that comes with its own USB surround sound card. Basically, I'm not as finicky about SQ with games if the money's a bit hard to get, since I'll be more concerned with not getting shot than if the sound of the rifle that I'm shooting doesn't sound like the real thing.

Of course, in the long run, I'll still use the receiver and standmount speakers with a large active sub, as I'm planning to build a new i7 rig (or just get the XBox-sized Alienware for not much more money to offset the man hours I'd spend trying to cram a heat exchanger into a miniITX chassis along with a discrete GPU) in 2014, but that's because I'm pairing it with my brother's old 46" LED HDTV so I can watch concerts and movies on it. And so I can sit away from the display with a wireless mouse and keyboard sitting like Takeda Shingen as overall commander in the intro movie on Shogun II.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by lemm View Post

 

Would be nice if one could do that. Nothing beats a real comparison. But then I'd be testing multiple receivers, multiple speakers and multiple soundcards which I doubt would be possible. That's why I'm here instead.

 

Well, when a friend did this before we brought our own speakers set. The thing is, he wouldn't have done that without me - half because I egged him, the other half is because (for "science"!) I offered to help him haul those things to the HiFi stores...which were on the fifth and sixth floors of a huge mall in the business district. I never again made such an offer on HT systems after that, unless it's in the store that's in the first floor of a nearby 2-storey strip mall.

post #25 of 68
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by PurpleAngel View Post

When you do the settings for the Sony receiver, it should display on the TV or monitor you have hooked up to the Sony.


Thanks. Not sure if the Sony STR DH520 shows the info on the TV or its display, but I think it comes with a mic too for auto room correction so it may be similar to the Denon you suggested.

post #26 of 68
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cel4145 View Post


Yeah. I'm not sure whether adjusting channel levels is possible via the HDMI output. The channel and delay adjustments are actually standard features on most AVRs. Here's what Audyssey does.

I guess with an AVR room correction adjustments would function while bitstreaming which I guess is the whole point, but room correction does still function when decoding in software and outputting to HDMI etc. Thanks for the link.

post #27 of 68
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ProtegeManiac View Post

 

That all depends on what the on-board soundcard is compatible with. IF it's compatible with it, then it will decode DTA MA-HD with no downsampling, and if there are any degradations to the signal past that, it can be from any weak points in the design of the analog output section, and maybe from the cables used from the analog transmission (this of course is much less audible, and for far less money, than some audiophiles claim). If for example it isn't compatible, a BluRay (DVD, HD-DVD) movie has several audio tracks and it will read whichever is, same thing with most games although of course the BluRay has all audio pre-recorded and the game is just processing it (not necessarily the exact same formats, but then the game will likely downsample what it outputs, as best I understand how they work).

This could be a problem. My old Asus boards sound properties show supported playback formats of 16/24bit with sampling frequencies of 44.1/48/96/192kHz I assume that makes it compatible regardless of the codec used. Note that my vintage analog receiver supports 24/96. But how would I ensure that a game or say a bluray is actually using the DTS HD MA at 24/96 etc and not the DTS Core? Unlike using HDMI / SPDIF which show the codec name its receiving on the receivers display, using analog does not show the incoming format so how can I verify that the bluray is not using another non HD track over analog cables like DTS Core or that there's no downsampling etc. for game audio.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ProtegeManiac View Post

I'm still likely to go for the HDMI receiver than the soundcard, for the reasons already stated, as well as the need to maybe get a separate surge protector or even voltage regulator/UPS for it will be offset by not having a soundcard add to the case, which brings with it heat and adds another obstacle to the airflow. But then again, that might not be a problem is you're using a full-size tower - I'm more of an small tower/SFF guy so space inside the chassis is a premium. Even if I had a receiver and makes for, overall, a larger area for all the gear, it's because I'm not likely to run the receiver at all times anyways, so in soem cases I can make do with a $50 (on sale) headphone that comes with its own USB surround sound card. Basically, I'm not as finicky about SQ with games if the money's a bit hard to get, since I'll be more concerned with not getting shot than if the sound of the rifle that I'm shooting doesn't sound like the real thing.

Of course, in the long run, I'll still use the receiver and standmount speakers with a large active sub, as I'm planning to build a new i7 rig (or just get the XBox-sized Alienware for not much more money to offset the man hours I'd spend trying to cram a heat exchanger into a miniITX chassis along with a discrete GPU) in 2014, but that's because I'm pairing it with my brother's old 46" LED HDTV so I can watch concerts and movies on it. And so I can sit away from the display with a wireless mouse and keyboard sitting like Takeda Shingen as overall commander in the intro movie on Shogun II.

Sounds like a nice build project. If I go with the soundcard option I'd prefer an external soundcard myself. That way I could use between full size/sff as needed. Maybe the onboard or Xonar U7 for standmount speaker gaming/movies and/or the Xonar U3 for headphone gaming/movies.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ProtegeManiac View Post

Well, when a friend did this before we brought our own speakers set. The thing is, he wouldn't have done that without me - half because I egged him, the other half is because (for "science"!) I offered to help him haul those things to the HiFi stores...which were on the fifth and sixth floors of a huge mall in the business district. I never again made such an offer on HT systems after that...

I'm all for helping people out but probably not something I'd do for myself. Hence why I'm here.

post #28 of 68
I think you might be getting sidetracked here with the discussion of analog output, bitrates, and decoding. The specs for your Philips LX700 are not very good (see the manual and the leaflet).

• Signal to noise ratio : >60dB (A-WTD)
• Dynamic range : >65dB (digital mode)
• Cross talk : >40dB (stereo mode)

50 watts/channel at 10% harmonic distortion.

Are you still using the Philips speakers that came with it? Those have 3" drivers and a high crossover of 120hz, and HTIB speakers generally have pretty poor audio fidelity.

Worrying about the bitrates and decoding is in this instance is like trying to make a McDonald's cheeseburger taste a lot better by changing the ketchup. It's still the same quality meat, cheese, pickle, and bread in the McDonald's cheeseburger. It's never going to be much better than a McD's cheeseburger by upgrading a condiment, and this Philips set is the equivalent of McDonalds when it comes to home audio.

You have to start replacing that gear out if you want better sound fidelity. If you already have upgraded the speakers, then a new receiver would help (although, I would not go with Sony). Especially if you have purchased speakers with bigger drivers capable of handling an 80hz crossover since doubtful you are not getting the full benefit of them with the Philips since the crossover is likely hard coded to 120hz to match the Philips speakers. And if you haven't, a new receiver is as good a place as any to start.
post #29 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by lemm View Post

This could be a problem. My old Asus boards sound properties show supported playback formats of 16/24bit with sampling frequencies of 44.1/48/96/192kHz I assume that makes it compatible regardless of the codec used. Note that my vintage analog receiver supports 24/96. But how would I ensure that a game or say a bluray is actually using the DTS HD MA at 24/96 etc and not the DTS Core? Unlike using HDMI / SPDIF which show the codec name its receiving on the receivers display, using analog does not show the incoming format so how can I verify that the bluray is not using another non HD track over analog cables like DTS Core or that there's no downsampling etc. for game audio.

 

 

Sounds like a nice build project. If I go with the sound card option I'd prefer an external soundcard myself. That way I could use between full size/sff as needed. Maybe the onboard or Xonar U7 for stand mount speaker gaming/movies and/or the Xonar U3 for headphone gaming/movies.

 

 

I'm all for helping people out but probably not something I'd do for myself. Hence why I'm here.

If you get the Asus Xonar DX or D1 sound card ($70) it can process 5.1 (6-channel) 24-bit/192Khz thru it's CS4398 DAC chip and then send the 6 analog audio signals to the Philips receiver, all the Philips has to do is amplifiy the analog audio signal to it's speakers. The CS4398 DAC chip should be a fair bit better then whatever DAC chip is in a budget receiver. The Sould Blaster Z ($80) DAC is the same as the Xonar DX/D1 and it comes with a headphone amplifier and a separate dedicated headphone jack

 

A computer program like Cyberlink PowerDVD 11 ($30) can play Blu-ray disks and should be able to process the Blu-ray's full audio (DTS HD Master Audio or Dolby True-HD) on the computer, then send that audio thru the sound card.

post #30 of 68
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cel4145 View Post

I think you might be getting sidetracked here with the discussion of analog output, bitrates, and decoding. The specs for your Philips LX700 are not very good (see the manual and the leaflet).

• Signal to noise ratio : >60dB (A-WTD)
• Dynamic range : >65dB (digital mode)
• Cross talk : >40dB (stereo mode)

50 watts/channel at 10% harmonic distortion.

Are you still using the Philips speakers that came with it? Those have 3" drivers and a high crossover of 120hz, and HTIB speakers generally have pretty poor audio fidelity.

Worrying about the bitrates and decoding is in this instance is like trying to make a McDonald's cheeseburger taste a lot better by changing the ketchup. It's still the same quality meat, cheese, pickle, and bread in the McDonald's cheeseburger. It's never going to be much better than a McD's cheeseburger by upgrading a condiment, and this Philips set is the equivalent of McDonalds when it comes to home audio.

You have to start replacing that gear out if you want better sound fidelity. If you already have upgraded the speakers, then a new receiver would help (although, I would not go with Sony). Especially if you have purchased speakers with bigger drivers capable of handling an 80hz crossover since doubtful you are not getting the full benefit of them with the Philips since the crossover is likely hard coded to 120hz to match the Philips speakers. And if you haven't, a new receiver is as good a place as any to start.

I'm not sure what all those specs mean exactly but the speakers still sound ok. The speaker themselves were sold as high frequency with a frequency range up to about 50kHz. I notice this is well above most that go up to 20kHz or some that go up to 30kHz. Surely this is a good thing? For a vintage receiver I never expected it to be on par with current tech. A lot of people are advising on a soundcard upgrade. But since almost all soundcards output through analog and almost all current receivers only input through HDMI how exactly do people hook a good soundcard up to a receiver? The fact that this has analog inputs makes it still a possible option for use with a new soundcard.

 

The Sony STR DH520 was on sale so that's what I was considering. Why do you advise against Sony? My other speakers have much larger drivers. I think I'll do a quick comparison but space becomes an issue unlike the satellites as they are much larger.

 

Nice analogy. I guess it's a factor if the next burger up costs 500.00 more and you're not entirely certain how much better it will be. Some ketchup might help.

 

Thanks.

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