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Audeze LCD-3 vs Fostex TH-900? - Page 11

post #151 of 316
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trogdor View Post


OK.
Let's agree to disagree.
Yes EQ is not going to make one headphone sound like another. I am not advocating that position.
It varies. Fankly, this whole quest for neutrality is insane without a reference. One man's neutral is another man's Grado!

I am 100% certain that neither the LCD-3 or TH-900 would be classified neutral. Believe it or not, from a purely FR perspective the Sony MDR-V6 is probably closer to "neutral."

Totally neutral would be a flat frequency graph. Which one has a flatter frequency graph?

post #152 of 316
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dubstep Girl View Post

i feel the TH-900s are well worth it, though a better price would be around $1200. anyways, they're slightly less resolving than beyerdynamic T1, have equal or slightly better transients, alot more bass and warmer mids, slightly less treble. similar soundstage, imaging, and separation, though the T1's are still more open.

 

the HD 800s are still the better headphones, though they are not as forgiving or as smooth as the TH-900s.

 

Agreed +1

post #153 of 316
Quote:
Originally Posted by rgs9200m View Post

I had D7000s (2 pairs, one recabled/balanced) and to me the TH900s just LOOK similar. The sound is completely different (read: better) I really, in a blind test, would not hear a family resemblance. 

The mids are rounded/organic/natural/full of texture on the Fostexes and really stand out as special.

They are easily a $2K phone and well worth the $1500 street price to me (I like'em significantly better overall than my HD800s, which I mention because they have the same price now).

 

(By the way, I'm with Greed above in his comments about using EQ in post 143. I tried some EQ in the digital and analog domains and it always added some blur/distance that I couldn't stand, like a layer of glass was in the way.)

 

Oh right....this could be what pushes me to get these. I have read differently in other reviews. There's only one real way of finding out obviously.

 

Just on another point - the hd800. I personally this this is talked about too much. I've properly heard a few of these from different setups (all top tier amps inc hdvd800 and BCL) and haven't really liked what I've heard. It doesn't recreate natural sound and is bland when it comes to musical rhythm/dynamics. Soundstage is large but it's a bit weird - almost like all the sound is out wide but doesn't come close (unlike the T1). I like the d7k more, and the T1 even more.

post #154 of 316
Quote:
Originally Posted by preproman View Post

 

Agreed +1

 

I agree with your agreement.  +2

post #155 of 316

I see quite a few people still posting about having to RMA their LCD-3's because of failed drivers.  And of course there was the "veiled" issue and issues with balance.  

 

Do the TH-900's not have similar problems?  

post #156 of 316
Quote:
Originally Posted by Meremoth View Post

I see quite a few people still posting about having to RMA their LCD-3's because of failed drivers.  And of course there was the "veiled" issue and issues with balance.  

Do the TH-900's not have similar problems?  

Haven't heard of any, other than the swivel issue with the very early batches.
Edited by Greed - 8/5/13 at 10:57pm
post #157 of 316

Swivel, and twisted cable at the y splitting spot is only prob I've heard and experienced so far with the TH900. But its not bad, and quite easy to fix, its the common problem that happens to almost every phone I've owned, included third party cable like ALO ones. 

post #158 of 316
Quote:
Originally Posted by Meremoth View Post

I see quite a few people still posting about having to RMA their LCD-3's because of failed drivers.  And of course there was the "veiled" issue and issues with balance.  

 

Do the TH-900's not have similar problems?  


There is one problem with the TH900's, which happens to be the same problem as the other "fostex" Denons.  There is a screw that attaches the cup/driver to the headband, which can come loose and results in the cup falling off.  Mine have not had an issue yet, but there have been a few cases of this.  The good thing is that it is relatively easy to fix yourself (there is a guide on head-fi somewhere) and if it is still under warranty I believe Fostex will fix it for you if you prefer.  If you want more details there is a thread that discusses this in greater depth.  Generally, if you are careful with your TH900's and refrain from wearing them "DJ" style they should be fine.

post #159 of 316
Quote:
Originally Posted by Audio Jester View Post


There is one problem with the TH900's, which happens to be the same problem as the other "fostex" Denons.  There is a screw that attaches the cup/driver to the headband, which can come loose and results in the cup falling off.  Mine have not had an issue yet, but there have been a few cases of this.  The good thing is that it is relatively easy to fix yourself (there is a guide on head-fi somewhere) and if it is still under warranty I believe Fostex will fix it for you if you prefer.  If you want more details there is a thread that discusses this in greater depth.  Generally, if you are careful with your TH900's and refrain from wearing them "DJ" style they should be fine.

 

That problem was on the very early models. Which from what I understand has been remedied. I haven't had issues - and I'm going on 8 months. 

post #160 of 316
Ive never had this problem with any fostex or denon ive had. Only a few headphones seem to have it and more common on the earlier ones, so i dont think its a reason not to buy, the chance of it happening is low and unlike the lcd-3 driver issues, it canquickly befixed
post #161 of 316
I have never had this problem either and it would definitely not stop me from buying the TH900. But it was an issue for a few people and I feel others should be aware that the Fostexs are a little fragile.
wink.gif
post #162 of 316

Hello, how are you?

Reading this thread, seems like both the LCD-3 and the TH-900 are both great for electronic music. So, are they the best headphones in production for electronic music?
A quite time ago I started to really enjoy this genre, and now, looking to my music library, I'd say that it's the genre I listen most, and by a big step.
Maybe I will get the LCD-3 pretty soon, but if my plan goes wrong, I wont be able to buy a expensive headphone like this without a couple of months of waiting.

 

Thank you.

post #163 of 316
Quote:
Originally Posted by HFoletto View Post

Hello, how are you?

Reading this thread, seems like both the LCD-3 and the TH-900 are both great for electronic music. So, are they the best headphones in production for electronic music?
A quite time ago I started to really enjoy this genre, and now, looking to my music library, I'd say that it's the genre I listen most, and by a big step.
Maybe I will get the LCD-3 pretty soon, but if my plan goes wrong, I wont be able to buy a expensive headphone like this without a couple of months of waiting.

 

Thank you.

 

Huge, huge electronic music fan here. I listen to everything from dubstep, electro, house, trance, ambience/instrumental techno, progressive, psytrance, EDM, trap, DNB, and whatever else is out there. Now, I haven't heard the TH-900, so I'll leave that for someone else. Although I've heard it's very good, which I won't doubt as I have their older model D2000.

 

Both LCD-3 and LCD-2 are really good for music production. If you haven't heard the Audeze's before, maybe try out the LCD-2 first. Both are quite good. LCD-2 might actually satisfy more of your needs, depending on preference.

 

The LCD-2/LCD-3 are similar to my KRK KNS 8400. They are really good for monitoring. LCD-2 and especially LCD-3 are quite good for mixing. However, I won't trust the final mixdown on either of them. Speakers are the way to go for me and majority of the people out there. However, the LCD-2/3's bass "tightness" will give actually give you a good indication of how that bass will be translated to on a club system. For example, with Mackie's, if I'm ever working with them in an environment I'm not sure of, I always put my hand on the woofer to get a sense of the kick by comparing it to other reference tracks and match it. I mainly use mainstream tracks for this as they are mastered in a way to sound "good" on most systems. If the kicks sound equally as good on your sample as they do on your reference, then you're doing something right. 

 

So what I'm saying is that LCD-3 will make gauging your kick and bloom much easier. Although where soundstage and transients are concerned, I'll still go speakers whenever I can.

 

Forgive me as I don't know your situation. Now I don't know if you already have a speaker monitor setup, but if you don't there are two things you can do:

 

1) Buy LCD-3 and mix as much on them as possible. When you think they are quite good, take it to a friend's place with decent setup to finish it or rent out a proper studio for a day and get it perfect.

 

2) Get LCD-2 and maybe pick up some speakers like Mackie HR824 mk1 or mk2. Either will do. You can use the LCD-2 for a lot of your recordings and then finish the final tweaks and soundstage and depth on the speakers. Also, remember the difference in treble between speakers and a headphone, especially the LCD-2 and LCD-3. While the Mackie don't provide the tonality as good throughout as the LCD-2, they do however image and present very nicely. This renditioning is very critical for electronic music. A good speakers mix will translate good on other speakers and headphones. However, I haven't always found a good mix on a headphone to always be a good mix on speakers.

 

Both options will cost you roughly the same. Again, not sure of your current equipment, budget and whether this is for fun/on the side or actually serious. 

post #164 of 316
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoom25 View Post

 

Huge, huge electronic music fan here. I listen to everything from dubstep, electro, house, trance, ambience/instrumental techno, progressive, psytrance, EDM, trap, DNB, and whatever else is out there. Now, I haven't heard the TH-900, so I'll leave that for someone else. Although I've heard it's very good, which I won't doubt as I have their older model D2000.

 

Both LCD-3 and LCD-2 are really good for music production. If you haven't heard the Audeze's before, maybe try out the LCD-2 first. Both are quite good. LCD-2 might actually satisfy more of your needs, depending on preference.

 

The LCD-2/LCD-3 are similar to my KRK KNS 8400. They are really good for monitoring. LCD-2 and especially LCD-3 are quite good for mixing. However, I won't trust the final mixdown on either of them. Speakers are the way to go for me and majority of the people out there. However, the LCD-2/3's bass "tightness" will give actually give you a good indication of how that bass will be translated to on a club system. For example, with Mackie's, if I'm ever working with them in an environment I'm not sure of, I always put my hand on the woofer to get a sense of the kick by comparing it to other reference tracks and match it. I mainly use mainstream tracks for this as they are mastered in a way to sound "good" on most systems. If the kicks sound equally as good on your sample as they do on your reference, then you're doing something right. 

 

So what I'm saying is that LCD-3 will make gauging your kick and bloom much easier. Although where soundstage and transients are concerned, I'll still go speakers whenever I can.

 

Forgive me as I don't know your situation. Now I don't know if you already have a speaker monitor setup, but if you don't there are two things you can do:

 

1) Buy LCD-3 and mix as much on them as possible. When you think they are quite good, take it to a friend's place with decent setup to finish it or rent out a proper studio for a day and get it perfect.

 

2) Get LCD-2 and maybe pick up some speakers like Mackie HR824 mk1 or mk2. Either will do. You can use the LCD-2 for a lot of your recordings and then finish the final tweaks and soundstage and depth on the speakers. Also, remember the difference in treble between speakers and a headphone, especially the LCD-2 and LCD-3. While the Mackie don't provide the tonality as good throughout as the LCD-2, they do however image and present very nicely. This renditioning is very critical for electronic music. A good speakers mix will translate good on other speakers and headphones. However, I haven't always found a good mix on a headphone to always be a good mix on speakers.

 

Both options will cost you roughly the same. Again, not sure of your current equipment, budget and whether this is for fun/on the side or actually serious. 

 

+1

post #165 of 316
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoom25 View Post

 

Huge, huge electronic music fan here. I listen to everything from dubstep, electro, house, trance, ambience/instrumental techno, progressive, psytrance, EDM, trap, DNB, and whatever else is out there. Now, I haven't heard the TH-900, so I'll leave that for someone else. Although I've heard it's very good, which I won't doubt as I have their older model D2000.

 

Both LCD-3 and LCD-2 are really good for music production. If you haven't heard the Audeze's before, maybe try out the LCD-2 first. Both are quite good. LCD-2 might actually satisfy more of your needs, depending on preference.

 

The LCD-2/LCD-3 are similar to my KRK KNS 8400. They are really good for monitoring. LCD-2 and especially LCD-3 are quite good for mixing. However, I won't trust the final mixdown on either of them. Speakers are the way to go for me and majority of the people out there. However, the LCD-2/3's bass "tightness" will give actually give you a good indication of how that bass will be translated to on a club system. For example, with Mackie's, if I'm ever working with them in an environment I'm not sure of, I always put my hand on the woofer to get a sense of the kick by comparing it to other reference tracks and match it. I mainly use mainstream tracks for this as they are mastered in a way to sound "good" on most systems. If the kicks sound equally as good on your sample as they do on your reference, then you're doing something right. 

 

So what I'm saying is that LCD-3 will make gauging your kick and bloom much easier. Although where soundstage and transients are concerned, I'll still go speakers whenever I can.

 

Forgive me as I don't know your situation. Now I don't know if you already have a speaker monitor setup, but if you don't there are two things you can do:

 

1) Buy LCD-3 and mix as much on them as possible. When you think they are quite good, take it to a friend's place with decent setup to finish it or rent out a proper studio for a day and get it perfect.

 

2) Get LCD-2 and maybe pick up some speakers like Mackie HR824 mk1 or mk2. Either will do. You can use the LCD-2 for a lot of your recordings and then finish the final tweaks and soundstage and depth on the speakers. Also, remember the difference in treble between speakers and a headphone, especially the LCD-2 and LCD-3. While the Mackie don't provide the tonality as good throughout as the LCD-2, they do however image and present very nicely. This renditioning is very critical for electronic music. A good speakers mix will translate good on other speakers and headphones. However, I haven't always found a good mix on a headphone to always be a good mix on speakers.

 

Both options will cost you roughly the same. Again, not sure of your current equipment, budget and whether this is for fun/on the side or actually serious. 

 

Thank you so much for the answer, so kind of you replying me with a long explicative text like that!

 

But, I don't know if I expressed myself bad or anything, however when I said "are they the best headphones in production for electronic music?" I wasn't talking about music production, but about headphone in production. The LCD-3 is in production, yet the Sony R10 isn't.
I do not plan to mix, record or do anything similar with those headphones. I plan to just sit down and enjoy a complete 
pleasurable listening. I like playing instruments, really enjoy that, however, for those headphones, I'm looking for listening just.

 

The electronic genres I enjoy most are Electro, House, Glitch Hop, Drum and Bass, Chill Out, Dubstep and Moonbahton. But, my favorite are those with female vocals, I really enjoy it in electronic music.

 

Thank you so much again and sorry for the mistake.

Henrique Foletto.

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