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Does Equalizing actually distort music? - Page 4

post #46 of 53
Are you speaking from experience, Hulk? What software or equipment do you use to EQ?
post #47 of 53
Equalization is a mathematically linear operation: it's equivalent to multiplication by a complex number at each frequency. Because it's linear, it can be inverted. No new frequency content is created and no frequency information is lost. Therefore the correct answer to the Op is simply "no"

If you folks want to debate how much distortion is added by the hardware implementations of EQ that operate on line level signals using precision audio opamps wity distortion figures orders of magnitude smaller than boutique audiophile tube power amps, be my guest. If you want to debate the distortion of software implementations, then I'd like to remind you that double precision floating point numbers have a precision of 10^-16 :1. It should be obvious that any resulting distortion is due to operator error.

Cheers
post #48 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post

Are you speaking from experience, Hulk? What software or equipment do you use to EQ?

Yes, have you used Winamp pre2001?  Older computer hardware had limitations, especially the lower end stuff. A firmware I flashed to my Nexus 4 had something wonky with the DSP, so EQ was causing nasty hiss.

 

Not really much from the top of my head, but my hesitance towards EQ came from somewhere.  Usually not the case anymore, but the last program I wrote was inefficient, and as a result would have 'distortion'   (positional audio engine for a game)

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ab initio View Post

Equalization is a mathematically linear operation: it's equivalent to multiplication by a complex number at each frequency. Because it's linear, it can be inverted. No new frequency content is created and no frequency information is lost. Therefore the correct answer to the Op is simply "no"

If you folks want to debate how much distortion is added by the hardware implementations of EQ that operate on line level signals using precision audio opamps wity distortion figures orders of magnitude smaller than boutique audiophile tube power amps, be my guest. If you want to debate the distortion of software implementations, then I'd like to remind you that double precision floating point numbers have a precision of 10^-16 :1. It should be obvious that any resulting distortion is due to operator error.

Cheers

If your mathematically linear operations were as perfect as my flexing.. Well.. I could give you perfect matrices instead of precise ones ;))

post #49 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by HulkHogan View Post
 

Yes, have you used Winamp pre2001?  Older computer hardware had limitations, especially the lower end stuff. A firmware I flashed to my Nexus 4 had something wonky with the DSP, so EQ was causing nasty hiss.

 

I'm not talking about the little doodads built into iTunes and other portable players. I'm talking about a real equalizer designed to do global calibration. I agree that the little eq apps that have presets named after types of music suck. But those are just gimmicky tone controls, not equalizers. I'm talking about 31 band graphic equalizers and ten band parametrics. Those don't do anything but improve sound quality.

post #50 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by HulkHogan View Post

If your mathematically linear operations were as perfect as my flexing.. Well.. I could give you perfect matrices instead of precise ones wink.gif)

Well, this point is obviously true. No argument here!

Cheers
post #51 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
 

 

I'm not talking about the little doodads built into iTunes and other portable players. I'm talking about a real equalizer designed to do global calibration. I agree that the little eq apps that have presets named after types of music suck. But those are just gimmicky tone controls, not equalizers. I'm talking about 31 band graphic equalizers and ten band parametrics. Those don't do anything but improve sound quality.

With modern equalizers you would have to be nuts to actually perceive an unwanted distortion.  I do not even know if there is recording hardware that can capture the distortions produced.

post #52 of 53

Here is a typical 31-band graphic equalizer: dbx231s

 

Quote:
 
Input Type Electronically balanced/unbalanced, RF filtered
Input Impedance Balanced 40k ohm, unbalanced 20k ohm
Output Type Impedance-balanced/unbalanced, RF filtered
Output Impedance Balanced 100 ohm, unbalanced 50 ohm
Bandwidth 20Hz to 20kHz, +0.5/-1dB
Frequency Response <10Hz to >50kHz, +0.5/-3dB
Dynamic Range Typically >112dB
Signal to Noise Ratio Typically >95dB
THD+Noise <0.003%
Interchannel Crosstalk <-90dB, 20Hz to 20kHz
Bypass Switch Bypasses the graphic equalizer section in the signal path
 
MSRP $279.95

 

I like to think of this as a $279.95 audiophile cable that actually colors the sound (and in a controllable, repeatable way).

 

THD+Noise < 0.003%. Nothing to see here, move along, move along.

 

Cheers

post #53 of 53

best cable ever(seriously)!

 

 

 

 

 

 

:veryevil: I'm gonna put one between my computer and my dac to EQ in the digital domain! :devil_face:

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