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Skeptico Saloon: An Objectivist Joint - Page 32

post #466 of 960
This will give you all the info you need on HDCD:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Definition_Compatible_Digital

Hope that helps!
post #467 of 960
Quote:
Originally Posted by krismusic View Post

What do you mean by "global sound"?
Ah. Got it. Universal.
post #468 of 960
Quote:
Originally Posted by Copperears View Post

It does, I have a few HDCD discs, and they are slightly "sweeter/warmer" than standard CD. I don't see it as any improvement in accuracy, it really is just application of a global sound sweetening processing onto the disc. Works for certain types of music, gets old if you hear it all the time, like any kind of globally-generated coloration.

Are you playing them on a HDCD-capable player? I don't think it's equivalent to global EQ unless the changes introduced by HDCD encoding are played back on a non-HDCD-capable player. Looking at the article I get the impression that the added detail of HDCD properly decoded may not be audible (as with any 16+bit process) but the distortion introduced by not decoding the HDCD may be more audible.
post #469 of 960
Right, I think it had more to do with distortion reduction, but the results I vaguely recall were supposed to sound "sweeter" as a result. One of the early experiments in trying to "improve" 16-bit/44kHz playback, which doesn't need improvement.

At the time, the problem was more one of understanding how to properly use dynamic range during recording and engineering masters, without risking the introduction of harsh digital distortion in the recording process when input would go over-limit (in analogue recording, hitting that limit and actually going past it was a kind of sweetening effect, as it would introduce a kind of distortion that was considered pleasing; recording engineers used to going into the red zone continued to do so in the early days of digital, with unhappy results).

The thinking behind HDCD seems to be that you basically provide a decoder that allows a "20-bit" recording to get decoded and played back at "16-bit" without being affected by the then-typical-process of bit reduction during mastering -- kind of extending the mastering function to a chip in a player, something like that.

All ultimately just seemed like bottlefly madness to me. I know I'm not being highly accurate in my description. smily_headphones1.gif
post #470 of 960

HDCD are/were made with dynamic range compression and uses dither with a special subcode embedded in it that controls filtering and a "expander"

 

the dynamic range compression is mild and quite listenable without the HDCD processor - as a design goal

 

the HDCD reciever chip/sw also upsamples allowing "room" for a few different digital filter characteristics - I don't know if this feature was often used

 

 

likely the HDCD processing tools were only bought and used by studios/engineers committed to superior mastering practices in the 1st place

post #471 of 960
What...in the world is a Super High Material Compact Disc??
post #472 of 960

I guess a normal CD. But the marketing department will tell you that it's made from unobtanium and polished with tears of the last unicorn, to improve storage quality of bits ... 101110 becomes 101110. Don't you see how much clearer the latter is?

post #473 of 960
Quote:
Originally Posted by miceblue View Post

What...in the world is a Super High Material Compact Disc??

Can anybody who reads Japanese figure out what the website listed says about it?

post #474 of 960
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssrock64 View Post
 

Can anybody who reads Japanese figure out what the website listed says about it?

http://www.cdjapan.co.jp/popular_formats/SHM-CD/

post #475 of 960
Quote:
Originally Posted by KamijoIsMyHero View Post
 

http://www.cdjapan.co.jp/popular_formats/SHM-CD/

Today in things I should've done before somebody else did it for me...

post #476 of 960
Quote:
Originally Posted by xnor View Post

I guess a normal CD. But the marketing department will tell you that it's made from unobtanium and polished with tears of the last unicorn, to improve storage quality of bits... 101110 becomes 101110. Don't you see how much clearer the latter is?
Quote:
Originally Posted by KamijoIsMyHero View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by ssrock64 View Post

 
Can anybody who reads Japanese figure out what the website listed says about it?
http://www.cdjapan.co.jp/popular_formats/SHM-CD/
Quote:
enhanced audio quality through the use of a special polycarbonate plastic
...
SHM-CDs feature improved transparency on the data side of the disc, allowing for more accurate reading of CD data by the CD player laser head

Now whenever I read that, I read "Shake My Head-CD"
post #477 of 960

It really means Super High Material? What kind of lame abbreviation is that?

 

When I read "shm" I think of shared memory.

post #478 of 960
When analyzing a song's spectral content, and there seems to be a lot of high-frequency sounds at a 22 kHz cutoff (from a Red Book standard album), what does that mean?

From my experience, Japanese rock music, and I suppose many other rock genres, seems to have this high-frequency sudden cutoff.


A drumset's cymbals contribute to the high frequencies, but to have so much energy at the 22 kHz cutoff seems odd to me. Could it be due to the recording microphone clipping? Was the song's treble boosted during the mixing and/or mastering process?

Evidently by the screenshot, clipping within the song exists, and it has a Dynamic Range rating of 5, which seems about right for today's rock music I think.

Speaking of which, how is it possible for heavier rock genres to have a higher dynamic range? I guess I need to look into the concept of dynamic range more in depth, but with heavier rock genres, the instruments are pretty much constantly being hit/strummed, so I can't really see how a high dynamic range could be obtained for this music genre in the first place.

This Japanese art rock song from 1998 looks better in the treble region, relatively speaking. Ironically it sounds a little more realistic to me since it has the kind of reverberation effect typical of a live album, but the Dynamic Range rating is only 4.
¯\_(ツ)_/¯
post #479 of 960
You're zooming in on just 18kHz-22kHz. If you look at a conventional scale, from 0-22kHz, you'd probably see a natural rolloff from the bass to the treble as usual?
post #480 of 960
Apologies if this is the wrong place to ask this question. Am I right in thinking that a BA will not reproduce a frequency that it is not capable of whereas a dynamic driver will try and distort?
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