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[REVIEW] Westone Adventure Series ADV Alpha - A Thing That Goes Thump in the Night - Page 4

post #46 of 86

Actually it's generally safer in LA than most places because traffic is bumper to bumper most of the time, but it's still unsafe. Driving is inherently dangerous, about 50,000 people die a year in auto accidents. That's a lot, and if everyone started driving with headphones on, I promise that number would go waaaay up.

 

If you really do drive down desolate roads with nobody else in sight, then do what you want, but please don't put other people at risk because you want to have fun.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jazzkammer View Post

Enough of this sermonizing. You know, some people have long commutes on desolate roads with nary another car in site. Or they drive on highways late at night or early morning where they are the only car on the road. Or they are out in the country where there is not much traffic. In such instances, wearing headphones is perfectly fine. Not everyone lives in LA with crazy traffic 24/7

Edited by Gilly87 - 7/27/13 at 9:30am
post #47 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by Icehawk View Post

I can understand why you would think that - however most serious motorcyclists wear earplugs.  My (DOT approved) full face helmet has bluetooth and I can listen to tunes that way as well.  It crapped out on me so instead of running earplugs & bluetooth I'm using an IEM.  You may not know how much wind noise a motorcyclist is exposed to even in a full face helmet and hence the recommendation to wear earplugs, also if you don't have experience with earplugs you may not realize it but things like a honking horn or a siren are still easily heard.

 

You don't need to worry about *my* awareness - I have to worry about YOURS when I ride ;) but I do appreciate the sentiment.

 

Really? My dad has been a biker for 20 years and has plenty of biker friends, and none of them wear headphones; foam ear plugs I can understand to protect from all the LF ad wind noise on big bikes, but those don't really isolate you, they just muffle everything. I rode across the country on the back of his Honda Valkyrie, (a flat 6, much bigger than most bike engines) with a full-face helmet, and that in itself made hearing harder; I can't imagine IEMs on top of that. How do you hear other vehicles around you? A bluetooth helmet makes sense, but I would think the isolation from IEMs, especially ergo-fit style, would prevent you from hearing the traffic around you. I've never done it so I guess I'm in no place to judge, but driving with headphones when driving is already dangerous, especially on a motorcycle, just seems really foolish to me.

post #48 of 86

These headphones don't isolate much...  and foam earplugs typically have much higher NR ratings than IEMs. 

post #49 of 86

"Much higher?" Most ear plugs are rated at between 20-30 dB of attentuation, which is the same neighborhood that most ergo-fit style monitors (the same style as ADV) claim. For example Shure claims their IEMs can attenuate up to 37 dB, and that's passive isolation without music playing.

 

Honestly I'm not going to try to tell you what to do. I just don't think it's smart.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Icehawk View Post

These headphones don't isolate much...  and foam earplugs typically have much higher NR ratings than IEMs. 


Edited by Gilly87 - 7/28/13 at 9:58am
post #50 of 86

So what are some other sweatproof earphones that compete with this?  I know bose and klipsch both have some sweatproof iem in the low $100 range, but these seem to be a level above that.  Are there any direct competitors?
 

post #51 of 86

nice review.

post #52 of 86

How long the cable actually is, 48"?

post #53 of 86

The cable is pretty long, about 1.2m

 

After having the ADV for over a month, I find that it sounded very good out of a Sansa Clip+ (which makes it an excellent iem for workout) and DX50 + Pico Slim. It is so good that I can't find any fault on it. Bass quantity is just right.

 

On other source, the bass is sometimes over the top. Despite so, the quality of its mids and treble are very good and they react well to EQ.

 

Comfort wise, this iem is a big win for me. It is small, light and fits extremely well. It will just disappear in your ears. Microphonic noise is close to zero. Isolation is perfect.

 

At US$199, this is perhaps one of the most pricey workout iem. However, the excellent built quality, SQ and fit really makes it fit for the purpose it was designed for.

post #54 of 86

How would these compare to V-Sonic GR07 Bass Edition?

post #55 of 86

Hey, I know this thread is quite old but hopefully some folk are still watching it.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by a_recording View Post
 
Okay, I got a pair of SE215 LTD's specifically to compare to the ADV. I know that a lot of people like the SE215, and I was told by Tomscy2000 that the LTD and ADV sound similar.
 
Initial impressions are exactly that. They do have a similar sort of signature. Now that I think more about it, the ADV may have targeted exactly the same signature and gone for a more premium build. The SE215 seems to have a bit more vocal richness but the ADV sounds tighter and cleaner. On very initial impressions I kind of prefer the SE215 LTD.
 
I am pretty sure that anyone who liked the SE215 but wish it a) wasn't made out of a seemingly very durable metal instead of plastic b) water resistant c) was willing to pay twice the price (or only an extra $50 if you factor in the slightly crazy price that Shure charges for the iPhone remote cable) would like the ADV. 
 
I think the question really does hinge on how much more money people are willing to pay for build quality / durability, because in terms of sound they are close to toe to toe.
 
I might update this review or make a SE215 / ADV / FXD80 comparo thread...

 

This really caught my interest. I've always bought Shure and over the last three years I've destroyed 2 pairs of SE215 and now my SE215LTD are getting a bit crackly after just 9 months. I use them in the gym and for running (often in the rain) and they are just not built to withstand this.

 

However the fit and isolation is the best I've found and I really love the sound they produce, particularly the LTDs, so I just keep replacing them when they break.

 

The guy in my local audio store tried to sell me the Westone ADVs last time I was in. I gave them a try but found the bass to be too boomy, not clear and punchy like the 215s. However I tried them with the standard rubber tips, whereas I use the largest foams with my Shures, inserted very deep.

 

Can anyone who has these give me any more feedback on how different tips alter the sound, and do these phones 'burn in' noticeably?

 

Cheers

post #56 of 86

I am wondering if anyone could help figuring out how these Westone ADV Alpha can compare to Monster Turbine Pro Copper and Monster iSport Immersion. I am looking for a replacement for either of these for daily usage. So comfort is an absolute requirement while robustness is great when I commute by bus every day to and from work.

post #57 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sylanel View Post
 

I am wondering if anyone could help figuring out how these Westone ADV Alpha can compare to Monster Turbine Pro Copper and Monster iSport Immersion. I am looking for a replacement for either of these for daily usage. So comfort is an absolute requirement while robustness is great when I commute by bus every day to and from work.


I'd go for the ADV Beta instead and hope they worked out a few of the Alpha's "kinks". Price is better(on release anyway), you can wear it both ways, and hopefully it is a little more balanced/less dark.

post #58 of 86
Any info on when they'll be available on the market?
post #59 of 86

The presser...http://myemail.constantcontact.com/WESTONE-ANNOUNCES-SECOND-GENERATION-ADVENTURE-SERIES-BETA-EARPHONES--BRINGING-PREMIUM-SOUND-TO-THE-ACTIVE-LISTENER.html?soid=1102655398472&aid=wq1MYaMe_Hc

...said available now and that was January 7th.

 

Sorry about that as I know better than to trust when a company says an earphone is to be released. They were supposed be here by now but maybe they are just holding them back to sell down stock of the Alpha first. Maybe shoot Westone an email.

post #60 of 86

@jant71 I followed your recommendation and sent an email to Westone. I received a response from the brand marketing manager after asking for details about price and availability stating I got interested and was referred by the Head-fi.org community. Here is the answer I received for everyone's information:

 

 

Quote:
 Good morning,

The ADV Beta will be released over the next few weeks and will be available via an authorized distributor (http://www.westone.com/music/authorized-adventure-series-dealers-and-distributors
 
) or on the Westone website. 

We will upload details on Beta to the website within the next week. The MSRP in Canada will be $229.99.

The ADV Beta offers the same sonic excellence as the Alpha, combined with a new precision-crafted Zinc unibody, aluminum faceplate and swivel cable for multiple fitting positions. 
Like the ADV Alpha, it features a 6.5 Dynamic Driver and has a frequency response of 20 Hz - 18 kHz.

Thank you for your interest in Westone. We truly appreciate the support of the Head-Fi.org community!

 

I dunno if the difference between the Alpha and Beta can justify waiting and paying more as the Alpha is currently on sale for $149.99 at Headphonebar.com.

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Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Portable Headphones, Earphones and In-Ear Monitors › [REVIEW] Westone Adventure Series ADV Alpha - A Thing That Goes Thump in the Night