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"Very Best" DJ Headphone <$500? - Page 3

Poll Results: Best DJ Headphones Quality + Comfort <$500

 
  • 6% (3)
    Ultrasone DJ1 Pro
  • 2% (1)
    Allen & Heath XD2-53
  • 12% (6)
    Pioneer HDJ-2000
  • 26% (13)
    V-Moda Cross Fade M-100
  • 44% (22)
    Senheisser HD-25 II
  • 10% (5)
    Other (please specify below)
50 Total Votes  
post #31 of 90

DJ'ing and studio headphones are vastly different. In general. As mentioned several times now, DJ headphones mostly need isolation, durability, and accentuated bass and treble response so you can hear the beats in the mix. Most mixing boards have a high output impedance, but you don't really care since sound quality is secondary when you're on the job. 

 

Studio headphones strive for more neutrality, and can be either open or closed. If mixing with headphones, I would also highly recommend looking into room/speaker simulators so you can check what your mixes sound like in different settings. You want good extension at both ends, and fast spectral decay. Recording headphones require low leakage (usually related to how well they isolate) and depending how you have the sound looping back they may not need a strong bass response if you're primarily focusing on a vocal. 

 

Leisure headphones typically have a slight bass accent for a bit of that "fun factor". Treble presence is highly dependent on taste, though most will lean towards a slightly downturned treble. Many like to have mild treble spikes too, which can give music that extra "edge" or "sparkle". Age also plays a large roll in treble, as you lose your upper treble as you age, so headphones that exaggerate that may actually compensate for the lost upper end. 

 

 

@inthere

Just to be pedantic here... are you certain that yours are genuine?

post #32 of 90
Quote:

 

@inthere

Just to be pedantic here... are you certain that yours are genuine?

 

 Well, I got them directly from Pioneer after playing a set in their booth at last years DJ Expo, so I hope so, lol. 

 

 Just to be clear though, I swear by Pioneer mixers and won't do live performances on anything else. There are a lot of positives about their headphones but I think durability is a problem and I've already let them know. The R&D department is very good and they send me a questionnaire every month about what I think will make their headphones better, so maybe the next model will be great. 

post #33 of 90
Thread Starter 

What a nasty picture! eek.gif lol, I'm sorry to see that.

 

Well, I think we sorted out dj headphones ... most likely the germans or the v modas ... though I'm thinking the germans. is there any better option?

 

As for now, since I'm don't have a musical education and music composition has never been a strong quality in me, so no need for studio headphones.

 

Though, my father dedicated his life to learning, playing, and teaching the practice of music, I would be more inclined to hear peoples opinions on home audiophile ... because I know what enjoy and what I don't enjoy, and I'm starting to want to listen to all my favorite genres for extended periods of time to choose my best of the best and start making mixes and playing sets of my own.

 

... I'd like to recreate the loudspeaker experience on my head as home audiophile for these genres ... but that doesn't mean I need to have a loud loud speaker experience, both loud and chill out post party experiences would be necessary and welcome. I wonder if there's a ph that would capture the sounds of these genres, listed below for your interest, I hope, or at least curiosity? 

 

I enjoy many, many styles of electronic music: 1970's fusion jazz, soul, funk up the modern stuff; 80's, instrumental, and abstract hip hop; Chicago, deep, funky, french, italo, acid and ambient house and ambient dub (the orb, future sound of London); ambient, experimental, Detroit first and second wave, listening and dancing ... planet e, plus 8, etc, English (orbital, Altern8, underworld), minimal, acid, hard acid techno, glitch, and glitch hop, ambient, technotrance and acid and hard acid trance, goa and psychedelic trance, chill out music, warp records, from the early bleep techno days and artificial intelligent series to Prefuse73, and Boards of Canada and Squarepusher, planet-mu, drill'n'bass, experimental, and really cut up diced up dancing jungle like Remarc and DJ Crystal, including ragga, breakcore, raggacore, ambient jungle, intelligent drum and bass; oldskool breakbeat hardcore, darkcore, 4-beat, happy hardcore's oldskool bouncy sound coming from Scottish Bouncy techno, ninja tune, trip hop like nightmares on wax, Kraftwerk, chemical, funky breaks, and i even like that sarah mclachlan remixed album, progressive house-trance of the early millennium ... so I guess I like a lot, enjoy listening to Moby from his first releases with his pseudonyms up to his dj mix of everything is wrong ... this list is in no particular order, it's rather what I've grown up with and enjoy and would like to learn how to play on (in?) my controller for entertainment of myself and many others in both indoor and outdoor parties with DIY loudspeakers.

 

I'm turning 32 in a few months ... is that old? smile.gif


Edited by Tweakings - 6/16/13 at 1:22am
post #34 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Armaegis View Post

 

Studio headphones strive for more neutrality, and can be either open or closed. If mixing with headphones, I would also highly recommend looking into room/speaker simulators so you can check what your mixes sound like in different settings. You want good extension at both ends, and fast spectral decay. Recording headphones require low leakage (usually related to how well they isolate) and depending how you have the sound looping back they may not need a strong bass response if you're primarily focusing on a vocal. 

 

 I have a Focusrite VRM box and I find it highly effective. A couple of negatives: there is a light reverb that doesn't sound natural and can be very annoying at times. Also the output is very low and can have a problem driving some cans. 

 

 I always put a headphone amp on it and even though I've read reviews that it sounds nothing like real speakers, honestly it fools the hell out of me sometimes. I haave to take the cans off to double check  that the speakers aren't on......a LOT. 

post #35 of 90
Thread Starter 

sorry for my long tangents... I don't know if my megalist is important to help choose the right headphones, sometimes less is more, but sometimes more is better, not sure in this case.

 

good morning,

Tweakings.


Edited by Tweakings - 6/16/13 at 1:30am
post #36 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tweakings View Post

 

... I'd like to recreate the loudspeaker experience on my head as home audiophile for these genres ... but that doesn't mean I need to have a loud loud speaker experience, both loud and chill out post party experiences would be necessary and welcome. I wonder if there's a ph that would capture the sounds of these genres, listed below for your interest, I hope, or at least curiosity? 

 

 The V-Moda M-100 is very good. You can DJ with them and you can purchase custom shields with your name or whatever and also change the colors. Home audiophile listening is possible but be careful if you use them with headphone amps because they're quite powerful and can easily distort. On a iPod or iPhone without an amp they will not distort even at max volume. I have also had durability problems in the past, but with the V-Moda M-80's (I'm very tough on headphones!) and I'm not sure they've been sorted yet, but so far so good. 

 

 Two weeks ago i spent a week with a famous DJ producing music. He and his wife both had Sennheiser HD-25's and of course I forced them to compare them with my favorite cans, the Marshall Major FX 50's..............they immediately bought them for themselves. They made the HD-25's sound like toys. I also brought Ultrasone 2400's and Beats Mixrs. 

 

 Since then, the new Marshall Monitors have replaced the Majors as my favorite headphones. Very smooth sound that doesn't compromise on clarity. Great separation also. I would however recommend the M-100's over the Marshall by your musical preference. The Marshalls are also pretty ugly imo, while the M-100's are pretty spectacular looking. 

post #37 of 90
sony v6 and sony mdr-v55
post #38 of 90
both are around 100$ v6 is balanced whereas v55 has rich bass
post #39 of 90
For listening, I'd invest in a nice pair of active monitors. Genelec is my favorite.

Also listen to your mix with headphones the general youth uses. Test it with ibuds and various 30 dollar headphones.

Your next investment should be a decent 2 channel limiter/compressor. Unfortunately.
Edited by ev13wt - 6/16/13 at 8:06am
post #40 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by inthere View Post

 

 I have a Focusrite VRM box and I find it highly effective. A couple of negatives: there is a light reverb that doesn't sound natural and can be very annoying at times. Also the output is very low and can have a problem driving some cans. 

 

 I always put a headphone amp on it and even though I've read reviews that it sounds nothing like real speakers, honestly it fools the hell out of me sometimes. I haave to take the cans off to double check  that the speakers aren't on......a LOT. 

 

 

I've had the VRMbox for a while as well and think it's a pretty good deal for such a little unit. I've noticed the occasional reverb as well, but only in the deep bass. I'm guessing it's a bit of phase cancellation due to how the software handles to transfer function. I've heard similar from the Isone Pro vst plugin which is also pretty good, especially considering it's free, but overall I think the VRMbox sounds better and has more options. The downside is that the VRMbox ties you to hardware (it'd be nice if Focusrite would release it as a plugin as well). 

 

Of note, I found that the VRMbox sounded better with open headphones, while Isone Pro was better with closed. I haven't tested that extensively though; just my rudimentary thoughts towards it. 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by inthere View Post

 The V-Moda M-100 is very good. You can DJ with them and you can purchase custom shields with your name or whatever and also change the colors. Home audiophile listening is possible but be careful if you use them with headphone amps because they're quite powerful and can easily distort. On a iPod or iPhone without an amp they will not distort even at max volume. I have also had durability problems in the past, but with the V-Moda M-80's (I'm very tough on headphones!) and I'm not sure they've been sorted yet, but so far so good. 

 

 Two weeks ago i spent a week with a famous DJ producing music. He and his wife both had Sennheiser HD-25's and of course I forced them to compare them with my favorite cans, the Marshall Major FX 50's..............they immediately bought them for themselves. They made the HD-25's sound like toys. I also brought Ultrasone 2400's and Beats Mixrs. 

 

 Since then, the new Marshall Monitors have replaced the Majors as my favorite headphones. Very smooth sound that doesn't compromise on clarity. Great separation also. I would however recommend the M-100's over the Marshall by your musical preference. The Marshalls are also pretty ugly imo, while the M-100's are pretty spectacular looking. 

 

I'm still not a fan of the M-100 having heard them on a couple occasions. I can see them for DJ use, but not for casual listening and absolutely not for mixing. They have stronger and cleaner bass than the M-80, but the M-80 is smoother overall and has cleaner mids and highs. 

 

Are the FX50 different from the regular Majors? The measurements of the Major over at innerfidelity are... not so good. I'm curious about the Marshall Monitors though. 

post #41 of 90

Just popping to say that the DJ1-PRO is definitely not a good choice for DJing. It is a neutral headphone that is really more studio headphone to me. They are rather heavy and don't stay on your head very well. With all the pro type Ultrasones they tend not to stay on your head if you plan to move along to the beat. Pro Ultrasones are listening phones IMO, and their sound tends to change with adjustments on your head as well.

post #42 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Armaegis View Post

 

 

 

I'm still not a fan of the M-100 having heard them on a couple occasions. I can see them for DJ use, but not for casual listening and absolutely not for mixing. They have stronger and cleaner bass than the M-80, but the M-80 is smoother overall and has cleaner mids and highs. 

 

Are the FX50 different from the regular Majors? The measurements of the Major over at innerfidelity are... not so good. I'm curious about the Marshall Monitors though. 

  

 I'm not really a fan of the M 100's either; I mean they sound very nice and not bad at all, but my personal opinion is the Marshall Major FX 50 is what I'd hoped the M-100 would be, if that makes any sense. They're on ear like the M-80 but just a more magical sound than the M-80's to me. Yes the M-100 has more bass and more volume and even more highs. But it doesn't sound like the frequencies are working together to give it it's own sound and feel. 

 

 I've had 2 pairs of FX 50's. The 1st pair sounded great immediately, in fact, a fellow DJ begged me not to play with them because they sounded so sweet. 

The 2nd pair gave me a 250+ hours burn in period. There were no highs and the mids sounded muffled. Eventually they sounded just as good as the 1st pair, but in the interim I was in contact with Marshall and they thought I had the regular Majors. That's when I found out that the Majors and the Major FX 50's were different. The Major FX 50's were my "gunslinger" headphones. They were the 1st headphones that could impress both audiophiles and Beats users. I've had Beats users shoot down LCD2's and HD 800's saying Beats were better. The 50's had them going "Wow!"

 An Audiophile friend wanted to sell his HD 800's after hearing them in a bar, until I explained the 800's would sound better on a headphone amp. He bought some anyway for portable listening. 

 

 And those annoying Beats owners that always hit me on flights telling me their Beats were better than my cans? Wooooooo, you should've seen their faces!

 

 The Monitors when I got them had NO bass. Very thin sounding. I was in a room with 8 friends when I unboxed them and all were supremely disappointed, because we all had high hopes after the 50's. They sounded very thin and.......sterile. I burned them in about 100 hours and things started sounded REALLY good. It's very hard to explain because the 50's had more of a "wow" factor and still do, but I just have a smoother and more pleasant listening experience with the Monitors. And The bass came in after burn in to the point where it was more bass than the Majors. The Monitors just have a very warm feel with a ton of clarity. The highs are very VERY smooth and even on some harsher songs things sound very smooth. 

 

 Not as spectacular as the majors but they're m favorites right now. 

post #43 of 90

M100 for EDM all the way. :D , I don't think there are any other portable headphones currently  on the market better for EDM than those. 

post #44 of 90

Marshall Major FX 50:

 

 

 

 

Marshall Monitors:

 

 

post #45 of 90

Figured I'd add in the regular Marshall Major just for comparison. Looks like they made a good improvement (at least in FR) with the FX50. 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by inthere View Post

Marshall Major Black/White:

 

 

 

 

Marshall Major FX 50:

 

 

 

 

Marshall Monitors:

 

 


Edited by Armaegis - 6/16/13 at 1:49pm
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