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Equaliser (EQ) knowledge

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
Hi guys,
I'm completely newbie to this site and music world. I'm starting interested in music and I try to learn some basic knowledge. I tried to seek for the topic of Equaliser(EQ) with the hope of finding useful information. But so far, the threads I have read were beyond my comprehension. Therefore, can you guys help me to find the simple articles that explain EQ in detail like how many bands are there, how can i notice low frequency, high frequency...
Thanks a lot!
Cheers.
P/s: sorry for my bad english and silly question biggrin.gif
post #2 of 18

Might just start here, then post questions about the parts you don't understand.  BTW, it's not a silly question!

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Equalization_(audio)

post #3 of 18
Thread Starter 
Thanks jaddie for providing me the general concept of equalization. However I do not understand how the normal equalizer, says eq in the mp3 player or ipod, operates. I mean how can I notice the particular frequency (like 500hz, 1k...) when playing along with the song.
Please correct me if I said something wrong!
Cheers smily_headphones1.gif
post #4 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by rivarex1104 View Post

Thanks jaddie for providing me the general concept of equalization. However I do not understand how the normal equalizer, says eq in the mp3 player or ipod, operates. I mean how can I notice the particular frequency (like 500hz, 1k...) when playing along with the song.
Please correct me if I said something wrong!
Cheers smily_headphones1.gif

What you're looking for can be found by Googling "ear frequency training".  You'll find several programs, demos, even apps.  You can also download Audacity.  In Audacity there are several tools you can use to train your ear to hear specific frequencies.  One is found in Generate > Tone, which you can create a tone of a specific frequency and hear how it sounds.  The other is found in Effect > Equalization.  Open a music file in Audacity and play with the equalizer, which has specific frequencies shown.

post #5 of 18
Thread Starter 
Thanks jaddie for fast reply. I have searched google and indeed there are a lots of apps. I also found there is android app called Quiztones. I'm currently waiting for my new order cowon z2 which is based on android os. I wonder if you ever have used Quiztones? If the answer is yes, it is good to try?
Cheers smily_headphones1.gif
post #6 of 18

@rivarex

 

You also might find this table useful in working out what different frequencies affect ....

 

http://www.independentrecording.net/irn/resources/freqchart/main_display.htm

post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brooko View Post

@rivarex

 

You also might find this table useful in working out what different frequencies affect ....

 

http://www.independentrecording.net/irn/resources/freqchart/main_display.htm

I found this to be very useful, thank you!!

post #8 of 18

I learned how to EQ by ear by listening to well recorded orchestral music and dialing the frequencies up and down with a good equalizer. The one built into iPods and iTunes isn't adequate for real world equalization in my opinion.

post #9 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by rivarex1104 View Post

Thanks jaddie for fast reply. I have searched google and indeed there are a lots of apps. I also found there is android app called Quiztones. I'm currently waiting for my new order cowon z2 which is based on android os. I wonder if you ever have used Quiztones? If the answer is yes, it is good to try?
Cheers smily_headphones1.gif

I have never used Quiztones, or any other app.  When I learned this stuff, there were no such things as apps. I had a physical graphic EQ and a tone generator with tubes in it.

post #10 of 18

http://harmanhowtolisten.blogspot.co.at/

 

Also just google for filters like:

- low/high pass

- band pass

- band stop or band reject

- peak or peaking or bell filter

- low/high shelf

- all pass

 

and:

- parametric EQ vs. graphic EQ


Edited by xnor - 5/24/13 at 9:16am
post #11 of 18
I think hearing the way different frequency bands affect music is better than tone generators. There are a handful of recordings I always use to EQ by ear. They have a wide range of frequencies in different combinations that make it easy to judge relative volume levels. Fiedler's Gaetie Parisienne on the Living Stereo label is the best. It quickly moves through all the spectrum so you can clearly hear if you have wolf tones.
post #12 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post

I learned how to EQ by ear by listening to well recorded orchestral music and dialing the frequencies up and down with a good equalizer. The one built into iPods and iTunes isn't adequate for real world equalization in my opinion.

Thanks for your advice bigshot,

I indeed want to practice EQ by listening some sort of music. I wonder if the headphone/earphone affects the ability to EQ music?

Cheers

post #13 of 18
The idea is to equalize to bring the headphones into line. If you own more than one type of headphone, you'll need more than one curve. It's best to EQ using acoustic groups (not electric instruments) recorded from a single point, like a binaural recording. I find that orchestral music is best for tuning the high and low end, and string quartets are good for the middle.

Once you get a reasonably flat response out of your headphones, just about anything that is calibrated flat will sound perfect. Most really good recordings are calibrated to flat response. Unfortunately, a lot of pop music is all over the map. It will take tone controls from album to album to pull those roughly into line.
post #14 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post

The idea is to equalize to bring the headphones into line. If you own more than one type of headphone, you'll need more than one curve. It's best to EQ using acoustic groups (not electric instruments) recorded from a single point, like a binaural recording. I find that orchestral music is best for tuning the high and low end, and string quartets are good for the middle.

Once you get a reasonably flat response out of your headphones, just about anything that is calibrated flat will sound perfect. Most really good recordings are calibrated to flat response. Unfortunately, a lot of pop music is all over the map. It will take tone controls from album to album to pull those roughly into line.

Thanks again for your helpful information, bigshot!

I currently own Audio Technica ATH-ES7 which is pretty much old model for the AT headphones line. There are some reviews on the net say this one is good for acoustic pieces. I have tested with some mp3 piano pieces and I heard the sharp, clear sound came from the ES7. It might be just my own experience but I wonder if this headphones good enough to EQ acoustic music? Are there alternatives that sound much better?

P/S: I am currently tight with my budget so I prefer the affordable but good headphones.

Cheers.smily_headphones1.gif

post #15 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brooko View Post

@rivarex

 

You also might find this table useful in working out what different frequencies affect ....

 

http://www.independentrecording.net/irn/resources/freqchart/main_display.htm

Thanks Brooko,

Although I just start to EQ music so I not much understand the chart, but this one looks simple and I believe it will be useful later.

Cheers.

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