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Who has an end game setup? - Page 22

Poll Results: This is my headphone. I am finished. I've owned these for more than 1 year.

 
  • 12% (24)
    Stax SR009
  • 5% (10)
    Stax SR007 Mk 1 or 2
  • 9% (17)
    Audeze LCD2 inc revision 2
  • 9% (18)
    Audeze LCD3
  • 10% (19)
    Fostex TH900
  • 29% (55)
    Sennheiser HD800
  • 1% (3)
    Sennheiser Orpheus
  • 2% (4)
    Sony MDR10 Bass heavy or light
  • 4% (9)
    JH Audio Or Custom in ear monitors
  • 3% (7)
    Beyerdynamic T1
  • 11% (22)
    any I've missed? Please post
188 Total Votes  
post #316 of 594
Quote:
Originally Posted by wink View Post

He is a broke head-fier.  Accuracy is important.

 

 

what is the difference? biggrin.gif i cant hear it tongue.gif

post #317 of 594
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheAttorney View Post

I'm not so sure about that. I've wasted invested more money in vinyl rigs in the past than I care to remember. The difference between entry level and high end record decks is very apparent. So it's all too easy for the vinyl enthusiast to just keep going higher.

 

Digital sources also keep getting better with price (when carefully chosen), but the differences are more subtle IMO. Maybe just as important at some level, but definitely more subtle.

I've NEVER taken the slightest bit of interest in chasing the numbers - only in the end musical result.


Does that mean you get more value out of a digital system?

 

Without doing direct comparison, I have been enjoying my two digital systems that are worlds apart. One the one end I have SD Transporter feeding a Cary DAC and on the other end I have the Linn Klimax DS. I do find I can enjoy both systems equally, but I do note the superiority of the Linn system. Putting them side to side (which I have done at some point), it was not even close. So while I do think you get what you pay for (whether analog or digital), I don't think you would necessary be happier with the pricier source or less happy with the less expensive source.

 

I think it's all about hedonic adaptation and it's really all in our heads.

 

<Not really taking my own advice on hedonic adaptation: I am thinking about upgrading my speaker amp to the new Ayre integrated at ~ 10k.>


Edited by chesebert - 6/15/13 at 8:51am
post #318 of 594
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cante Ista View Post

I have been powering my HE6s with First Watt F3 for about 6 month now. I dont think it is an endgame set up b/c while HE6 sound great, from what I have read I believe I could get more performance if I drop mega money (10,000 USD or so) on an amp. Still I am very happy with it, especially after an hour warmup and if I listen at 1 AM. That system will be expended soon though with the GSX mk2, which I will use to drive my HD800.

 

 

I had to get a really good power conditioner because I get too tired to listen by 1am.

post #319 of 594

I had to get a really good sleep because the great variety of different opinions was getting too hard to quantify without a load of shuteye.

post #320 of 594
Thread Starter 
Hedonic adaptation? Crikey! I wanted to talk about exotic gear not exotic words! Now we have an endgame time- 1 am. I've been awake a couple of hours but I'm beginning to feel like I need a lie down too. Right let's get this thread kick started again- Who's happy with their HD800 or other flagship system? Who's happy with their sub $500 system? By happy I'm looking for the mythical 6 months of ownership without anything being added to that setup and no plans to upgrade. By no means am I in this elite group; I am just curious. I bought an ALO PanAm 4 days ago and am looking for a more modern energiser for my sigma pros
post #321 of 594
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by spritzer View Post

I've had this SR-007Mk1 for 10 years this month and after hundreds of other headphones have come and gone, they are still here.  I have other Mk1's too but this one is special as it was the first I bought new.  It also doesn't hurt that is the best headphone ever made... 

 

Thanks Spritzer, I have listened to the SR007 MK1's for all of 30 minutes clearly they're amazing. 10 years is quite some recommendation. What's the best amp for them? I'm wondering whether changing my SRD6 to a pro bias SRD4 would improve my Sigma Pros
post #322 of 594

I'm really happy with this and my HD800's. 

 

 

 

 

 

Would be nice to see others endgame or temporary endgame ;) pics 

post #323 of 594
I thought that about my hd800 rig too until I found a stax amp at a decent price and then bought an o2.
post #324 of 594
Quote:
Originally Posted by LugBug1 View Post

I'm really happy with this and my HD800's.

 

Very nice! What do you use the Rotel for? I had one of those back in the day.

post #325 of 594
Quote:
Originally Posted by grokit View Post

 

Very nice! What do you use the Rotel for? I had one of those back in the day.

Thanks! Mostly for the power meter lights haha

 

My Pioneer has been recapped and serviced and the Rotel hasn't.. its a bit noisy. I'm going through a bit of a vintage phase at the mo, got an old Technics on my bedside as well. Basically I can't afford a high-end headphone amp and these old bad boys sound better than any of the mid-price amps I've bought over the years. Give or take a bit of hiss..  

post #326 of 594

I find it somewhat puzzling that throughout this discussion there has been no mention of the Smyth Realiser.  Admittedly, I'm speaker lover first and headphone lover second which is probably why I'm so attracted to the Realiser technology.  I've always enjoyed the three dimensional soundstage presentation of speakers.  Even though I enjoy listening to headphones, the headphone experience for me has always sounded unnatural; because no matter how accurate or detailed headphones may be, headphones always lacked the three dimensional quality of speakers.  But now that has changed.  Now, I can enjoy the best of both worlds.  The Realiser, combined with my current STAX rig, has allowed me to achieve (at least for the moment) my headphone "end game".

Note: For those unfamiliar with the technology, the Head-Fi Realiser product page is a good source of information in addition to the threads covering the Realiser mentioned below.

It's been my experience that the amount of improvement gained by use of the Realiser is several orders of magnitude above what one would expect with a change in DACs, amps, tubes or any number of other ancillary components - with the exception of speakers or headphones.  In my case, I found that the paring of my STAX system with the Realiser works especially well.  The speed and detail of the SR-009 seems to allow for an even more convincing experience through the Realiser as the signal is morphed to mimic the sound signature of the virtual system being experienced.  The SR-009 takes on a chameleon like quality and I find myself no longer focused on the sound signature of the SR-009 or amp, but more on the sound of the virtual speakers and the environment (good or bad) in which they were being played - with some recordings the effect is quite remarkable.

So transformational has the Realiser experience been for me, that I've felt little need for additional equipment upgrades, as the resulting gain would likely be minimal at best.  That's not to say that I'll never upgrade a component in the future, but it's much easier for me to justify a several hundred dollar expenditure on a new measurement to realize an order of magnitude gain vs. spending several thousands of dollars on a piece of equipment for a potentially incremental gain by comparison.

But herein lies the rub.  Not only is it difficult to gain access to truly great system to measure, but ideally, the system should also be setup in equally great acoustically treated environment because there is no getting around the fact that even an exceptional system in a bad room will still sound bad.  For now, I'm satisfied with the nine or so measurements I do have, but I'm continually in search of that next great system to measure.

Note: Measurements can be shared among Realiser users, although with varying degrees of success.  See this thread for more info.  But the best results will always be achieved from your own measurements of a particular system.

The Realiser has also allowed me to leverage my modest 2.1 channel stereo system consisting of two B&W 804S and a single Velodyne DD18 into a full blown virtual 7.2 channel home theater system consisting of seven B&W 804S and two Velodyne DD18 subwoofers - a system costing several times more than my current stereo system, not to mention I don't have room for such a large HT setup.

The Realiser is one of just a few audio products I've come across that actually delivers on its promise, but it's not without its shortcomings.  This product is not a plug-n-play device designed for everyone.  For home audio users, it places what some may view as a prohibitively restrictive demand on the purchaser in that you must first have measurements taken of an "ideal" system to fully experience the benefits of the Realiser.  For some, this will be a deal breaker.  Whereas, for those in the pro-audio profession who have access to elaborate multichannel recording studios this is not likely to be an issue at all.

I find the deficiencies of the Realiser more about technical integration issues, a steep user learning curve (the product is complex), user interface/friendliness and tactile feedback questions/issues rather than with the overall sonic performance of the Realizer (Note: These issues (and more) have been chronicled in this thread).  From a pure audio performance perspective, the Realiser for me successfully achieves its goal of accurately recreating the sound of a speaker system in a particular environment when using a pair of headphones - perhaps not with 100% accuracy, but certainly with a high enough degree of accuracy (perhaps 95% plus) to provide an extremely convincing portrayal of the measured system - of course, as always, your mileage may vary.

No product is perfect and the Realiser is certainly no exception.  However, given the functionality the Realiser provides, coupled with the expense saved from 1) not having to upgrade additional components, 2) leveraging my existing 2.1 channel system into a full HT system and 3) the prospect of experiencing additional state of the art virtual $100k+ systems in my home - it's easy to see why, at least for me, the Realiser is a $3,000 bargain.

As I mentioned at the outset, I find it odd that the Realiser is conspicuously absent from this discussion.  But I understand its lack of popularity given the relatively high maintenance requirements of the product.  Although I may be in the minority, I must say I'm quite grateful to the folks over at Smyth for making this technology available.  This truly groundbreaking technology, in combination with my STAX SRM-727II/SR009 rig, has allowed me to achieve my headphone "end game".

post #327 of 594

It's simple: I've never seen one and never heard one. So there's not much I can say about it.

But if I ever come across one in the UK, it's the component I'd most like to try out.

post #328 of 594
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzfan View Post

I find it somewhat puzzling that throughout this discussion there has been no mention of the Smyth Realiser.  Admittedly, I'm speaker lover first and headphone lover second which is probably why I'm so attracted to the Realiser technology.  I've always enjoyed the three dimensional soundstage presentation of speakers.  Even though I enjoy listening to headphones, the headphone experience for me has always sounded unnatural; because no matter how accurate or detailed headphones may be, headphones always lacked the three dimensional quality of speakers.  But now that has changed.  Now, I can enjoy the best of both worlds.  The Realiser, combined with my current STAX rig, has allowed me to achieve (at least for the moment) my headphone "end game".

Note: For those unfamiliar with the technology, the Head-Fi Realiser product page is a good source of information in addition to the threads covering the Realiser mentioned below.

It's been my experience that the amount of improvement gained by use of the Realiser is several orders of magnitude above what one would expect with a change in DACs, amps, tubes or any number of other ancillary components - with the exception of speakers or headphones.  In my case, I found that the paring of my STAX system with the Realiser works especially well.  The speed and detail of the SR-009 seems to allow for an even more convincing experience through the Realiser as the signal is morphed to mimic the sound signature of the virtual system being experienced.  The SR-009 takes on a chameleon like quality and I find myself no longer focused on the sound signature of the SR-009 or amp, but more on the sound of the virtual speakers and the environment (good or bad) in which they were being played - with some recordings the effect is quite remarkable.

So transformational has the Realiser experience been for me, that I've felt little need for additional equipment upgrades, as the resulting gain would likely be minimal at best.  That's not to say that I'll never upgrade a component in the future, but it's much easier for me to justify a several hundred dollar expenditure on a new measurement to realize an order of magnitude gain vs. spending several thousands of dollars on a piece of equipment for a potentially incremental gain by comparison.

But herein lies the rub.  Not only is it difficult to gain access to truly great system to measure, but ideally, the system should also be setup in equally great acoustically treated environment because there is no getting around the fact that even an exceptional system in a bad room will still sound bad.  For now, I'm satisfied with the nine or so measurements I do have, but I'm continually in search of that next great system to measure.

Note: Measurements can be shared among Realiser users, although with varying degrees of success.  See this thread for more info.  But the best results will always be achieved from your own measurements of a particular system.

The Realiser has also allowed me to leverage my modest 2.1 channel stereo system consisting of two B&W 804S and a single Velodyne DD18 into a full blown virtual 7.2 channel home theater system consisting of seven B&W 804S and two Velodyne DD18 subwoofers - a system costing several times more than my current stereo system, not to mention I don't have room for such a large HT setup.

The Realiser is one of just a few audio products I've come across that actually delivers on its promise, but it's not without its shortcomings.  This product is not a plug-n-play device designed for everyone.  For home audio users, it places what some may view as a prohibitively restrictive demand on the purchaser in that you must first have measurements taken of an "ideal" system to fully experience the benefits of the Realiser.  For some, this will be a deal breaker.  Whereas, for those in the pro-audio profession who have access to elaborate multichannel recording studios this is not likely to be an issue at all.

I find the deficiencies of the Realiser more about technical integration issues, a steep user learning curve (the product is complex), user interface/friendliness and tactile feedback questions/issues rather than with the overall sonic performance of the Realizer (Note: These issues (and more) have been chronicled in this thread).  From a pure audio performance perspective, the Realiser for me successfully achieves its goal of accurately recreating the sound of a speaker system in a particular environment when using a pair of headphones - perhaps not with 100% accuracy, but certainly with a high enough degree of accuracy (perhaps 95% plus) to provide an extremely convincing portrayal of the measured system - of course, as always, your mileage may vary.

No product is perfect and the Realiser is certainly no exception.  However, given the functionality the Realiser provides, coupled with the expense saved from 1) not having to upgrade additional components, 2) leveraging my existing 2.1 channel system into a full HT system and 3) the prospect of experiencing additional state of the art virtual $100k+ systems in my home - it's easy to see why, at least for me, the Realiser is a $3,000 bargain.

As I mentioned at the outset, I find it odd that the Realiser is conspicuously absent from this discussion.  But I understand its lack of popularity given the relatively high maintenance requirements of the product.  Although I may be in the minority, I must say I'm quite grateful to the folks over at Smyth for making this technology available.  This truly groundbreaking technology, in combination with my STAX SRM-727II/SR009 rig, has allowed me to achieve my headphone "end game".

Very nice write up! thank you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheAttorney View Post

It's simple: I've never seen one and never heard one. So there's not much I can say about it.

But if I ever come across one in the UK, it's the component I'd most like to try out.

I have actually caught the announcement of the Realizer here on Head Fi, and read a little bit about it, but have not seen it anywhere else. Personally, I am not jumping to buy it, even though it sounds like a great product, because there are many items on my purchase list much higher than it. In fact, for me the Realizer is something I would buy when I have completed my systems in every other respect. That is after I have the Sr009 and the BHSE, nice preamp, and speaker amp (perhaps) much better speakers and rebuilt my mac mini music server to run off a solid state drive. That is, if I had my endstate set up -- a truly endstate set up. 


Edited by Cante Ista - 6/20/13 at 3:45am
post #329 of 594

Even if the Realizer puts an end to any further upgrades, I suspect the dedicated audiophile will replace this with an endless pursuit of finding the perfect measurements (PRIRS).

 

I have this strange vision of  "PRIRS Chasers" roaming the countryside in search that elusive Quad ELS sound: "Hey guys, I've spotted one 10 miles away". "Oh, no, it's only a Martin Logan, and I've got 3 of those already"  

 

Edit: It's been a hard week...


Edited by TheAttorney - 6/20/13 at 1:16pm
post #330 of 594
Thread Starter 
The Smyth Realiser A worthy endgame device that only needs software adjustment to be upgraded at any time by the looks of it. I think if I had it I too would be spending a wad trying to see which top system sounded virtually best to my ears. It would be great fun though I've no doubt.

For now I'll stick to tone controls and windows based eq software. I know this must sound like sacrilege to you jazzfest but it uses the same idea that music can be individually tailored with good results You're just getting great results instead smily_headphones1.gif
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