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The Christiansen "DG" 300B Amplifier Build Thread - Page 10

post #136 of 630
Thread Starter 

I want to scream.

 

I have never been any good a polishing.

I'll us a compound like Wenol or tripoli to get a glass finish.

BUT, when I go to clean it, I'll get streaks, then spider swirls.  It's an endless loop.

 

I tried everything. Acetone takes off all the residual compound. Leaves streaks.

Next rubbing alcohol.

Next distilled water.

Next camera lens cleaner.  blink.gif

 

I took a propane torch to it.

I'm going to try Barkeepers Friend.

 

I need to google polishing.

post #137 of 630
Thread Starter 

Finished it to the best of my abilities.

Went over it with Wenol again.

By hand.  No buffer.

With a cloth removed all the excess.

No solvents.  Period

 

Hung it up and sprayed a coat of lacquer.

 

I know other could do better.  I reached my frustration limit.

post #138 of 630

For most things, the builder/maker/owner is much more critical than anyone else will be.  You will know the flaws, no one else will notice.  I'm sure you're looking at it at different angles, in different lighting conditions, and at just the right angle and light you see the streaks/flaws.

 

No one else is going to do that. 

 

And I'm sure it looks great, it looked good in the pictures and it probably looks better in real life. 

 

For the wood, as some point I was thinking of making a Teres turntable, had a bearing and platter.  Wanted to make an exoctic wood base, but it never happened and I eventually sold off the bearing.  Analog was too much work.  But at the time, I learned about cocobola, buginga and some other exoctic hardwoods.

 

Randy

post #139 of 630
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by randytsuch View Post

For most things, the builder/maker/owner is much more critical than anyone else will be.  You will know the flaws, no one else will notice.  I'm sure you're looking at it at different angles, in different lighting conditions, and at just the right angle and light you see the streaks/flaws.

 

No one else is going to do that. 

 

And I'm sure it looks great, it looked good in the pictures and it probably looks better in real life. 

 

For the wood, as some point I was thinking of making a Teres turntable, had a bearing and platter.  Wanted to make an exoctic wood base, but it never happened and I eventually sold off the bearing.  Analog was too much work.  But at the time, I learned about cocobola, buginga and some other exoctic hardwoods.

 

Randy

+1

 

thx

post #140 of 630

I am actually excited to see the finished results!  Awesome thread that is inspiring me to try a build.

post #141 of 630
Thread Starter 

I finished the illustrations for the enclosure.

I just hope it's completed in time for the meet...

 

The Neutrik XLR jacks are going to look clunky because they are meant for a metal panel.  Thus there will be these black rectangles on top of the wood face.  I already had to buy another set because I had male to begin with, but I've reached my limit.  I'm not going to spend $70 for gold Cardas jacks.

 

 

 


Edited by sceleratus - 7/1/13 at 10:17am
post #142 of 630

It looks great !

 

Even though I'd prefer a colored knob. Something along the lines of bloodwood (or even walnut), for example...

 

 

tongue.gif

post #143 of 630

It looks good.  I see you spec'd curly maple over birdseye.  I like that. :)

 

For the XLR jacks, you can use a 4-pin XLR instead of 2 3 pins, and then build adapter cables.  3 pin XLRs are very bulky, and 4-pins are lighter and more compact.

 

You can mount the jacks behind the faceplate.  You can recess an area behind and mount them so that the opening shows the XLR only.

 

OR

 

You can put a designed ring around the XLR jack, from a veneer.  So, you recess on the front panel to flush mount the XLR connector externally (the black rectangle visible), then put a thin veneer of walnut around the jack so that the black is not visible.  The jack extends from the panel a small amount, especially if you get the locking ones.  You'll need to recess bolt holes as well to make it look clean.

post #144 of 630

I would rotate the XLRs on the front 90 degrees so the "PUSH" tab faces up and recess them into the front panel such that the metal part is flush with the wood. I would also place them side by side rather than one atop the other. That'll give you more of a horizontal flow in a horizontal box.

 

The wood is plenty thick, so I wonder if you could recess the XLRs deeper and put an inlay over them. That could be pretty sleek. If you go with, say walnut for the volume knob, you could use a walnut inlay around the XLRs... 

 

~Tom

post #145 of 630
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the ideas.

 

The problem with the jacks is they were meant to be mounted behind a 0.106" metal panel.  To do the same with wood one would have to auger out all the wood except for 0.106"

That would be too thin for the front.  Inlay / veneer  is an idea, however, you wouldn't be able to remove the jacks.

 

Tom,

Good catch on the jack orientation.  Side by side is much better.

 

I thought about calling AquaTech to see if they saved a piece of bronze to make a bezel from. but that would probably be another $125 minimum charge.

 

I am set on the color of the knob.  Curley Maple.  I prefer that it blend in.

 

 

 

 

post #146 of 630
Thread Starter 

I drew up an inlay.

At first I was thinking the bronze material, but nixed that because I believe the naked jacks would look better.

 

I sent this to Mike to see about either a raised or inlay plate.  There wouldn't be holes if it was inlay.

This part may not happen in time for the meet.

 

 

post #147 of 630
Thread Starter 

Unless there are problems that merit posting, the next post should be the assembled working amplifier.  

post #148 of 630

For your XLR inlay, are you sure the "push" button won't interfere with installation?

post #149 of 630
Quote:
Originally Posted by randytsuch View Post

For your XLR inlay, are you sure the "push" button won't interfere with installation?

 

No, it's fine.  Just angle it as your putting it into the plate, and it slides into place.  It's what you do to panel mount them.

post #150 of 630
Thread Starter 

Randy,

 

You are correct.

Naturally, if I surface mounted them, no problem.

If they were mounted in a recess of the front panel, you wouldn't be able to angle the cover to nestle it into place.

They are designed to "hook" from underneath.

Actually, one couldn't use a raised surface plate either.

Many thanks for that one.

 

EDIT.  That's if you didn't want to see the two XLR jack mounting screws.

Thin inlay might work.

 

Rear Panel...

 


Edited by sceleratus - 7/1/13 at 11:50am
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