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The Christiansen "DG" 300B Amplifier Build Thread - Page 8

post #106 of 631
Thread Starter 

What is Scranton?

post #107 of 631
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomchr View Post

@ Holland: Keep watching my site. Sometime in the fall, I'll be offering a Spud that'll accept a couple of different sweep tubes - both triodes and pentodes. PCBs will be available. Stay tuned...

 

Thanks, will do.  Spud sounds cool.  Any insight on what tube and topology for the spud?  I've been meaning to put together a 12B4A amp, but haven't decided what topology I want to explore.

 

I saw your 6J5 driver, that looks along the lines of something I was looking to do.  No PCBs though, but I'm fine with point to point.  I may just build it,

post #108 of 631
Thread Starter 

Back to the real purpose of the thread.

 

I dropped off the Top Panel cad file (actually AI) and a 24" x 24" x 0.090" silicon bronze to Aqua-Tech for water jet cutting.  Should be done tomorrow.  They said the bronze would work well, I scored it as a remnant for $100 and copper would be a bunch more.  The cost?  $125.

 

I think I would have spent more on hole saw bits.  Then cutting 2 square pieces that were square and 2 round pieces that were round..... out of 0.090 material.  Even if I still had my plasma cutter,  it would have looked like my pinewood derby car.

 

So we have another fingers crossed moment.  Will my 5 times checked file actually line up with the components?

It will be a miracle only a bit smaller than the one that made the amp play music.

 

Looking ahead, I'll try to put a dark patina on it, seal it, and hand it off to by cabinet friend...

 

Looking for ideas on how to pull off my wooden power button.  Now I'm not a bad McGuyver but it hasn't hit me how to secure the wood button to the switch plunger.  There are dozens of styles, plastic mechanism, steel rod with a button cap.  The button will be large, about 1" dia.

 

Unlike a POT / Rheo there is no shaft that you can use a bushing with a set screw.  I could secure a weld nut to the back, that would gice me threaded female, but it's the actual mating with the push buttonshaft that I haven't figured out.  Usually I can get it by crawling through McMaster Carr.

 

Anyway,  I'm all eyes, if you have any ideas.  Thanks in advance.

 

 

post #109 of 631
I am having trouble picturing your switch problem. A picture or drawing might help

Randy
post #110 of 631
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by randytsuch View Post

I am having trouble picturing your switch problem. A picture or drawing might help

Randy

Randy,

Thanks for thinking about it. The issue was/is mating a wood knob/button, like a chunk of dowel, through a wood facia and mate with a spring loaded button.  The buttons don't have a shaft, like a rotary switch.

 

Solution, scrap the push button and use a 1 stop rotary switch.  I just ordered a 1/4" shaft collar with set screws to mate the two together.

 

I picked up the top and rear panel from the AquaTech today.  I am delighted.  Everything Fits !

I have a lot of de-burring to do.  The small holes need to be cleaned up, but I'd rather have them a tad small than sloppy.  Then the finishing....  Need to watch some YouTube videos on turning a new piece of bronze into an old one.   (There are over 70 holes)

 

I have dismantled everything for safe keeping.  When the new components arrive, I'll break out the iron and give it a test.  Always a worry when you modify something that was working.

 

 

post #111 of 631

Looks like they did an awesome job!

post #112 of 631
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by nelamvr6 View Post

Looks like they did an awesome job!

It's really amazing.  Every single fixture lines up and those are 3mm holes.

The hole saws alone would be $50 and they would shred the metal.  You'd have to pay more for a decent bit.

Then there is the time it would take.  One off target hole and the thing looks awful.

 

There are some serious scratches that will take some serious work. 

post #113 of 631
Quote:
Originally Posted by sceleratus View Post

It's really amazing.  Every single fixture lines up and those are 3mm holes.

The hole saws alone would be $50 and they would shred the metal.  You'd have to pay more for a decent bit.

Then there is the time it would take.  One off target hole and the thing looks awful.

 

There are some serious scratches that will take some serious work. 

I have faith you'll work it out...

post #114 of 631
Thread Starter 

I've used Scultp Nouveau patina products in the past on my home.  They are cool..... if done right.

 

I'm looking at this flat sheet of bronze and thinking "Not much character"

As such, I'm thinking about distressing it so the patina has some dimension.  It would be a real gutty move.

Like chains, ball peen hammer kinda distressing.  After the first blow, there would be no going back.  (Well try the back side of course)

 

Thoughts?  Anyone?

post #115 of 631
Quote:
Originally Posted by sceleratus View Post

I've used Scultp Nouveau patina products in the past on my home.  They are cool..... if done right.

 

I'm looking at this flat sheet of bronze and thinking "Not much character"

As such, I'm thinking about distressing it so the patina has some dimension.  It would be a real gutty move.

Like chains, ball peen hammer kinda distressing.  After the first blow, there would be no going back.  (Well try the back side of course)

 

Thoughts?  Anyone?

 

What have you got to lose?  If it doesn't turn out like you envisioned, you can always break out the Rustoleum, or powdercoat it, or any number of options...

post #116 of 631

It also looks symetrical, so your idea of flipping it over if you don't like the outcome will work, so you get two chances, and a 2nd chance is always a good thing wink.gif.

 

For the switch, I was wondering why you couldn't drill a hole in the wood part, and then bond it the push button, but you found a solution so it doesn't matter anyway.

 

Randy

post #117 of 631
Quote:
Originally Posted by sceleratus View Post

I've used Scultp Nouveau patina products in the past on my home.  They are cool..... if done right.

 

I'm looking at this flat sheet of bronze and thinking "Not much character"

As such, I'm thinking about distressing it so the patina has some dimension.  It would be a real gutty move.

Like chains, ball peen hammer kinda distressing.  After the first blow, there would be no going back.  (Well try the back side of course)

 

Thoughts?  Anyone?


Do NOT  beat on your chassis plate with hammers, chains, etc.. You will not only warp it, but even worse, distort all your carefully machined mounting holes and recesses. If you want to add some sort of effect to your metal, try having it run through a wide belt sander or check out the many chemical treatments available for bronze. In LA (actually the San Fernando Valley) check out Industrial Metal Supply. They have a huge variety of metal treatments and surface effects. Well worth a field trip.

 

I've been enjoying watching your progress. I do a lot of similar work. Hope to meet you at the upcoming LA meet.

post #118 of 631
Thread Starter 

Hi Frank,

 

Thanks for the advice.  We have an IMS in Irvine that I've gone to for years.  It surely is a toy store for big boys with TIG welders and plasma torches. (Used to have both)  I scored the Bronze sheet from the remnant bin for $100.  It was the only piece, remnant or otherwise, in the store.  The minimum order quantity for bronze or copper would have pushed the price over the top.

 

I picked up some Sclupt Nouveau bronze rub patina and gave it a try. I have used SN product on copper and got great results.   First, it's not the right formula, second it dawned on me that it will be too be too dark a contrast against the Birdseye maple.  I'm going to experiment to try and get more of a bottom-of-the-ocean green/blue.  That should work well against the maple and yield a mottled variegated look.  The surface is so large it needs to be broken up.

 

We are on the same page with the rocks and chains.  The risk/reward curve is too steep.  I know how I'd like it to look, but it's not a process for first time project.

post #119 of 631
Quote:
Originally Posted by sceleratus View Post

Hi Frank,

 

Thanks for the advice.  We have an IMS in Irvine that I've gone to for years.  It surely is a toy store for big boys with TIG welders and plasma torches. (Used to have both)  I scored the Bronze sheet from the remnant bin for $100.  It was the only piece, remnant or otherwise, in the store.  The minimum order quantity for bronze or copper would have pushed the price over the top.

 

I picked up some Sclupt Nouveau bronze rub patina and gave it a try. I have used SN product on copper and got great results.   First, it's not the right formula, second it dawned on me that it will be too be too dark a contrast against the Birdseye maple.  I'm going to experiment to try and get more of a bottom-of-the-ocean green/blue.  That should work well against the maple and yield a mottled variegated look.  The surface is so large it needs to be broken up.

 

We are on the same page with the rocks and chains.  The risk/reward curve is too steep.  I know how I'd like it to look, but it's not a process for first time project.

 

That's good.  Chemical treatment is best, IMO, as well.

 

Personally, I like a contrast.  Some sort of antique bronze against clear unstained highly figured maple looks good to me, with the orange glow of tubes.  I'm not sure about an oxidized look.  It might work, but I think the wood would need to look "old" as well to really pull that off.  Another option is to use cocobolo and then highly polish the bronze.  When it tarnishes, I think it would be a nice look.

post #120 of 631
Thread Starter 

Cool Holland.

 

I will look into Cocobolo.  

The unstained maple is cast in stone.  Birdseye is an amazing looking wood.

I think you are correct, dark oxidize will not work.  Soft might.

I have to seal it when I get it where I like it.  Thats what the patina products do, they accelerate the process and you can stop it at any point.

 

Living in socal is helpful because there are a lot of artists.  I've asked an artist that uses metal for help.

 

Right now I'm off to the garage to polish scratches.

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