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[REVIEW] Aurisonics ASG-2 & 2.5 (with many comparisons) - Page 268

post #4006 of 6746
Quote:
Originally Posted by crushnburn46 View Post

Noob question pls! What is df?

 

Diffuse-field (equalisation). Here's a pretty good explanation from the beyerdynamic website:

 

Quote:
What is diffuse-field equalisation?


Have you ever wondered why a frequency response curve is almost never included with headphones? I can let you in on the secret: they look terrible! Such an erratic frequency response graph would hardly encourage customers to make a purchase. What the customer wants in the end is something that is linear. Uncoloured. Solid.


But why do these frequency response curves look so horrible? And why do you not clearly hear these glaring leaps and drop-offs?


How we hear


From childhood on, humans are accustomed to perceiving acoustic events. We grow up with a variety of sound sources and get used to them. The baby rattle, the clatter of dishes from the kitchen, pedestrians on the street, music from loudspeakers, etc. – all of these sound sources have something in common: they are located relatively far from the ear.

 

Before the sound from these sources reaches our eardrum, it is coloured by the shape of our head and our ear. Depending on the angle, many frequencies are accentuated and others are attenuated. With time, we learn these frequency patterns and are able to do things such as recognise the direction in which the sound source is located. Therefore, we do not hear sound as it was produced at the source, but instead in coloured form.


Loudspeakers and headphones


When we listen to music over loudspeakers with a linear frequency response curve, we are actually hearing a spectrum that is influenced by the distinctive shape of our head. We perceive this as linear.


When listening with headphones, the headphones do not even try to generate any effects on the outer ear, since the sound source is so close to the ear. What comes out of the headphones arrives at the eardrum in relatively uncoloured form. In order for the headphones to still sound natural, the sound must be coloured so that it is as similar as possible to the colourations caused by the shape of the head and ear. In other words, the headphones must have the frequency response set so that it sounds like the sound is coming from a distant source.


Diffuse-field equalisation


In order to adjust headphones to our listening habits, we must first use technical means to measure the colourations caused by our head. For example, an artificial head with microphones in the ears is used. When this artificial head is exposed to sound, you can use the microphones to measure how the sound would be perceived by us instead of the artificial head.


So that the headphones do not have a sound that always seems to come from one direction, but instead can reproduce all sound directions equally, the artificial head must be exposed to sound from many directions and the result averaged. This does not perfectly reproduce any direction perfectly, but no direction is completely suppressed.


At beyerdynamic, there is an echo chamber for this purpose. It is a small, five-sided room with acoustic sails on the ceiling that looks quite bare and empty. The fascinating thing about it is that, although it is the size of child’s room, it sounds like a cathedral! An octahedron loudspeaker that radiates sound in eight directions is in one corner. If you are far enough away from the loudspeaker, the strong echo causes you to no longer be in the direct field, but instead in the diffuse field of the loudspeaker, i.e. the area in which the sound reflected off the walls is louder than the sound that is coming directly from the loudspeaker.


If artificial head measurements are carried out in this chamber, many sound directions overlap due to the echo, allowing us to obtain the required averaging. This averaging (the measurement in the diffuse field) gives diffuse field equalisation its name.


In order to equalise the headphones, they are placed on the artificial head and the frequency response is adjusted so that the measured frequency behaviour corresponds to that of the diffuse field.


Discussion


Since the mechanical and electronic options for changing the frequency response of headphones are limited, the equalisation cannot be carried out perfectly. Different headphones are also adjusted to various tastes. It is by no means the case that all diffuse-field equalised headphones sound the same. In addition, the frequency patterns for directional hearing depend on the shape of the head and ears. For this reason, they are a little different for everyone. Hence, measuring with an artificial head is a pretty arbitrary choice.


Diffuse-field equalisation is therefore an important part of improving localisation with headphones and avoiding “in-head localisation”, but it is not guaranteed to work and is no replacement for extensive test listening.

post #4007 of 6746
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mimouille View Post

It is someone who criticizes the ASG2 on this thread, abbreviation of Dead Fu**er

Don't scare the man with your filthy lying lies. It stupidly stands for Dirty Fartcannon. Mods are kinda anal about disparaging remarks as such, but they just seem to pass by overhead like HKs when we abbreviate it.

So when someone says that the Ety ER-4S is DF tuned, you know what's up.

Some other unscrupulous people around here might try to sell you on the idea that it means something ridiculous like Diffuse Field. Like that makes sense at all. Diffuse Field Tuning. This isn't frickin Neon Genesis Evangelion. It's like a big joke around here. Let's tell the newbies it means some crazy sci-fi sounding thing. Hahaha. But it's not funny. Don't get suckered in like the others.
post #4008 of 6746
Damnit James, two minutes, two frickin minutes.
post #4009 of 6746
Quote:
Originally Posted by vwinter View Post

Some other unscrupulous people around here might try to sell you on the idea that it means something ridiculous like Diffuse Field.

 

Busted! :D

post #4010 of 6746
Quote:
Originally Posted by vwinter View Post  Diffuse Field Tuning.

 

I've been waiting for the world's first Higgs field tuned earphone. Amen.

post #4011 of 6746
Is anyone willing to let their ASG-2 go? PM me. Thanks

Robert
post #4012 of 6746
Quote:
Originally Posted by vwinter View Post

Don't scare the man with your filthy lying lies. It stupidly stands for Dirty Fartcannon. Mods are kinda anal about disparaging remarks as such, but they just seem to pass by overhead like HKs when we abbreviate it.

So when someone says that the Ety ER-4S is DF tuned, you know what's up.

Some other unscrupulous people around here might try to sell you on the idea that it means something ridiculous like Diffuse Field. Like that makes sense at all. Diffuse Field Tuning. This isn't frickin Neon Genesis Evangelion. It's like a big joke around here. Let's tell the newbies it means some crazy sci-fi sounding thing. Hahaha. But it's not funny. Don't get suckered in like the others.

But... What if you resemble Shinji? Can I still pilot Unit-01? Where's my half-German fräulein? I don't wanna live in this world anymore frown.gif

Lookin forward to your FA-4/Cardas impressions wink.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by SnowFalls View Post

Is anyone willing to let their ASG-2 go? PM me. Thanks

Robert

Might wanna hit this seller up and see if they're still sellin:

http://www.head-fi.org/t/684160/aurisonics
post #4013 of 6746
Hey there,

PM'd him, thanks for the link!
*Still open to new offers smily_headphones1.gif

Robert
Quote:
Originally Posted by SnowFalls View Post

Is anyone willing to let their ASG-2 go? PM me. Thanks

Robert

Might wanna hit this seller up and see if they're still sellin:

http://www.head-fi.org/t/684160/aurisonics[/quote]
post #4014 of 6746

How do these fare with electronic music (trance, house, trouse, d'n'b,) and hip hop?
I have the GR07 BE and I am enjoying them a lot for that type of music, wondering if ASG-2 would be a step-up? Or is more suited to classical music, indie rock and softer/slower genres?

post #4015 of 6746
I think the ASG-2 shines with acoustic music and vocals. Music that's not full already. It brings that sort of music to life.
post #4016 of 6746
Compared to the 5.0 or the 4.ai, how's the "full"ness?
post #4017 of 6746
Quote:
Originally Posted by SnowFalls View Post

Compared to the 5.0 or the 4.ai, how's the "full"ness?

 

Cant say for the 5.0, but before when i would switch from the ASG-2 to the 4.Ai, i would always feel like their thin and grainy sounding.

post #4018 of 6746
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoonYeol View Post

I think the ASG-2 shines with acoustic music and vocals. Music that's not full already. It brings that sort of music to life.

 

+1

 

I prefer the GR07 BE for electronic. Bass is a little tighter with a better sub-bass to mid-bass ratio to my ears. Mids seems a little more even. 

post #4019 of 6746

For me the softer but more impactful bass can be an asset. It's the scooped out upper mids that makes the ASG-2 a bit less than ideal for e.g., aggressive rock music. At least for critical listening. On a bus they're rockin it hard.

post #4020 of 6746
Thread Starter 

Guys, seriously check out the Of Monsters and Men album on the G2. Apart from how good it sounds and well mastered it is, the music is very nice.

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