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Replacement for SE215's

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

So I started with S4's then I got some Shure SE215's which I liked because they blocked out a lot more noise but I missed the bass and the highs but also liked that the lower treble/uppermids weren't sibilant like with the S4's. I also over time realized that the 215's are way more detailed, I just always missed the bass punch and and some of the treble cut in the S4's. I could boost the bass with my E17 but the treble never sounded good EQ's, it didn't get "brighter" just louder if that makes sense.

 

So I got my 215's 2 years ago on black friday then last year I got some 535's and promptly (X-mas time) lost my 215's and I still haven't found them so I'm looking for a replacement, I love the 535's but I want something cheaper and more mainstream/all around sounding and less mid-centric.

 

I thought about the blue 215's for a little more bass but idk? I really wanna try the UE900's but they are to much money. Any other ideas?

post #2 of 7

First off -  http://www.head-fi.org/t/596233/buying-portable-or-in-ear-headphones-seeking-guidance-dont-start-a-new-thread-ask-for-advice-here

Multi-IEM Review - 281 IEMs compared (VSonic GR07 BE and R02 Silver Added 05/15/13 p.688)

In case you haven't found these - other places to ask questions regarding portable gear.

 
Even more punchy than the SE215? So I'd assume you can take a bit of a loss in terms of texturing in favour of punch? If there is a budget being considered (although the mentioning of the UE900s makes that a bit iffy) that'd be helpful in terms of narrowing the categories down. Would you also want to retain the ergonomics and build/design of the SE215 or are you flexible? 
 
Seems like you want something a bit more V-shaped but not as abrasive as the S4s though. Perhaps the FXT90s are worth a look?
post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwinQY View Post

First off -  http://www.head-fi.org/t/596233/buying-portable-or-in-ear-headphones-seeking-guidance-dont-start-a-new-thread-ask-for-advice-here

Multi-IEM Review - 281 IEMs compared (VSonic GR07 BE and R02 Silver Added 05/15/13 p.688)

In case you haven't found these - other places to ask questions regarding portable gear.

 
Even more punchy than the SE215? So I'd assume you can take a bit of a loss in terms of texturing in favour of punch? If there is a budget being considered (although the mentioning of the UE900s makes that a bit iffy) that'd be helpful in terms of narrowing the categories down. Would you also want to retain the ergonomics and build/design of the SE215 or are you flexible? 
 
Seems like you want something a bit more V-shaped but not as abrasive as the S4s though. Perhaps the FXT90s are worth a look?

Texturing in the bass? I guess so, I like bass impact, the bass on the S4's was crazy deep and loud but overly lose and boomy, however I find the bass on the Shures almost overly tight? That seems imposable, to make something shorter decay but, idk maybe I'm just use to listening to slightly boomy stuff.

 

Budget, would be something I'm not afraid to lose I guess? lol under $300? $250 or under probably, I want something good, the 215's were good and I could just get another pair but I hate the stock cord and I don't wanna pair $50 for the weaker but much more comfortable iPod cord when I will be running it out of an amp most of the time so the iPod controls wont work.

 

Other than the cord the ergonomics of both the 215's and S4's were great.

 

I wouldn't really say V-shaped, I do prefer a V-shaped sound signature but when I say that every one usually suggests really V-shaped stuff. I think I just don't like the treble role off on the Shures. My favorite cans are my D5000's and although the bass is a little lose they actually measure very flat.

post #4 of 7
Thread Starter 

The only ones I can think of are the 215 blue's and the Turbine Pro's, I had the regular Turbines and they didn't do it for me.

 

Here's IjokersI review of the sound of the 215's, and I would agree completely.

Sound (7.8/10) – Up until a recent month-long trial of the SE530 and SE535, my experience with Shure’s earphones was limited to the old SE115, E3, and E4C models, every single of one of which failed to impress when the time came to gauge sound quality against asking price. Shure’s aging mid-range models simply weren’t keeping up with products from many of the smaller Hi-Fi brands so well-liked around Head-Fi. With the dynamic microdriver used in the SE215, however, things are different – Shure has seemingly decided to attack the competition head-on. Of course, the engineers realized that the $100 SE215 is likely also going to be the model most popular in consumer-oriented retail environments and gave it an impressively consumer-friendly sound signature to boot.

Clearly emphasized over ‘flat’, the bass of the SE215 is powerful and carries good depth and detail. From memory, the older mid-range Shure models I’ve tried all yield to the SE215 in bass quantity and impact. Impact is plentiful on the whole, though the SE215 is not quite a bass monster. Compared to the Spider Realvoice, for example, the low end of the SE215 is a touch punchier and more detailed but less lush-sounding and liquid. The bass is quite well-controlled compared to bass-heavy competitors such as the Xears TD-III but sounds flabby and slow next to more hi-fi sets such as the VSonic GR07 and Sunrise Xcape v1.

The midrange of the SE215 is slightly warm and a little dry. It is balanced well enough with the bass, avoiding the mid-forward presentation of Shure’s flagships. Compared to the Xears TD-III and N3i, too, the midrange of the SE215 lacks a bit of authority and forwardness. On the whole, it sounds smooth, textured, and detailed – definitely a strong suit of the earphone. The SE215 surpasses the Spider Realvoice in detail and can be compared favorably to the MEElec CC51, with the Shures coming across slightly thicker and less fluid and the CC51s sounding cleaner and crisper, but not as warm or fleshed-out. The upper midrange of the Shures reveals a bit of grain but nothing distracting or even unpleasant. Really, aside from the balance, the biggest concession of the SE215 to the top-tier SE535 is a complete lack of the open feel of the latter.

The lower treble of the SE215 is plentiful but the earphone rolls off slightly at the very top and runs out of steam even earlier than that – lack of upper-end resolution and refinement is slightly more noticeable than with the old SE530. Like the SE530, the SE215 lacks a bit of energy and sparkle and can sound dull with some material. What’s there, however, is clean and inoffensive, though the SE215 does lose more resolution still as things get busy. Sibilance and harshness are usually left out of the equation but the signature of the SE215 does seem to encourage higher-volume listening in order to extract all of the detail the earphones have to offer - a problem I don’t have with the similarly-priced HiFiMan and Sunrise in-ears.

The presentation of the SE215 is pleasant – reasonably wide and with a good overall sense of distance, space, and position. There less depth and height to the stage than with the Spider Realvoice or Xears N3i but the presentation is generally sufficient. The Xears and Spiders tend to be more enveloping and 3D-sounding but the SE215 is by no means flat. The only real limiting factor is a perceived lack of air resulting from the laid-back treble and the subsequently underwhelming imaging. Still, instrument separation is decent and it is doubtful many will be disappointed with the presentation considering the price of the earphones.

Value (9/10) – Perhaps Shure’s most competent mid-range model to date, the SE215 is a thoroughly modern earphone in every sense. Highly isolating for a dynamic-driver set and boasting a smooth and detailed sound signature with an emphasis on bass and mids, the SE215 is poised to be a high-value in the consumer market. However, there are a few issues aside from the dullness of the signature that may make potential buyers wary. One is the unusually high defect rate with early-batch units - Shure doesn’t seem to have all of the bugs of the cable connectors worked out quite yet although complaints about the higher-end SE535, which uses the same connectors, seem far less common. The other caveat has to do with the ergonomics – the stiff memory wire and bulky connectors can get in the way of achieving the perfect fit. Anyone willing to look past these potential issues will be rewarded by a surprisingly competent brand-name earphone at a price that’s almost too reasonable.

Pros: High isolation, solid sound quality with consumer-friendly signature

Cons: Detachable cable can be unwieldy, may be uncomfortable for some users<agreed

 

The highlighted part is the part about the treble that I have an issue with, as I said I don't really want V-shaped I want a better 215 with no treble roll off and a little more bass/bass impact, and a little bit better refined and less dry mid-range considering I'm willing to spend more.

post #5 of 7
Thread Starter 

Help

post #6 of 7
Thread Starter 

Thinking about the GR07 Bass Edition?

post #7 of 7
Thread Starter 

UPP

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