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Is burn in real or placebo? - Page 22  

post #316 of 520

OK, that made me laugh.

 

With regard to break in, any other folks out there wear spectacles?  I notice every time I change a prescription it takes a bit for me to not notice a change when I put the new specs on.  Which is breaking in, my brain or the lenses? 

post #317 of 520

Well, wearing glasses can in fact affect the sound. I have measured something like up to 3 dB difference in the bass response with a DT770 Pro 250 (closed headphones are more sensitive to changes in the seal).

post #318 of 520
Quote:
Originally Posted by stv014 View Post

Well, wearing glasses can in fact affect the sound. I have measured something like up to 3 dB difference in the bass response with a DT770 Pro 250 (closed headphones are more sensitive to changes in the seal).
Lol dude I think he's talking about why it takes a while for new spectacles to give you a natural view o the world.

My opinion is that it's your brain trying to adjust to new ( and definitely clean ) lenses
post #319 of 520

Of course, it also takes some time to adjust to any optical effects, like being able to focus accurately, correctly perceiving distances, etc. The new lenses may also have a small amount of distortion or other minor problems that one needs to get used to.

post #320 of 520
Ja!
post #321 of 520
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlindInOneEar View Post
 

OK, that made me laugh.

 

With regard to break in, any other folks out there wear spectacles?  I notice every time I change a prescription it takes a bit for me to not notice a change when I put the new specs on.  Which is breaking in, my brain or the lenses? 

Obviously the lenses. You didn't know? 

 

Heat heat from your head is transferred by the legs into the lens, slowly warping the lens into the proper shape. In theory you could speed this process up by putting your new glasses on a grill for a good 8 to 24 hours, some high end lenses require at least 100. I really don't know why they don't ship them out of the factory pre burned in. It would save a lot of hassle. 

post #322 of 520
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThinkAwesome View Post

Obviously the lenses. You didn't know? 

Heat heat from your head is transferred by the legs into the lens, slowly warping the lens into the proper shape. In theory you could speed this process up by putting your new glasses on a grill for a good 8 to 24 hours, some high end lenses require at least 100. I really don't know why they don't ship them out of the factory pre burned in. It would save a lot of hassle. 

Haha dude the high end ones have to be put into a nuclear reactor to burn in properly wink.gif
post #323 of 520
Quote:
Originally Posted by lookingforIEMs View Post

Haha dude the high end ones have to be put into a nuclear reactor to burn in properly wink.gif

I tried this and everything was fine until I played a Nickelback CD and then suddenly I burst into flames and all the dogs in the neighborhood started barking and people started wandering the streets like zombies and then instantaneous spontaneous combustion of all forms of life and the neighborhood was wiped out in a blast akin to Bikini Island atoll in 1951. I'm writing this from heaven. Er, hell I mean.
post #324 of 520
Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidJ1973 View Post

I tried this and everything was fine until I played a Nickelback CD and then suddenly I burst into flames and all the dogs in the neighborhood started barking and people started wandering the streets like zombies and then instantaneous spontaneous combustion of all forms of life and the neighborhood was wiped out in a blast akin to Bikini Island atoll in 1951. I'm writing this from heaven. Er, hell I mean.
Oh no! It seems you have experienced a laaalalalallalalalallaalalalaal. If you're still covered under warranty, you can swap them in for new ones. If you are already over the warranty, here's a list of what to do. Firstly, obtain some fairy dust. No, I don't mean those cheap imitations. I mean the actual dust that came straight from tinkerbell. Then, drop the fairl dust into a genie jar, with a genie inside of course. Do this all over your toilet bowl for the next step. Just as the genie is coming out of the jar, drop the jar into the toilet bowl and flush it. Then you gotta act fast. The toilet water will turn green and I want you to drink up as much of it as you can. This will give you a thousand wishes and so you can fix your problem
post #325 of 520
Quote:
Originally Posted by thegunner100 View Post
 

I agree that it's generally pretty minor. If you don't like a pair of headphones before break-in, then burn-in probably isn't going to make you really like it.

 

this +1

 
Although honestly... all science aside I like the little rituals of audio gear lol, even if it's total BS... I'll still slap a new pair of cans to an amp and a nice playlist of tunes for a day or 2 ;3 
post #326 of 520
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlindInOneEar View Post
 

OK, that made me laugh.

 

With regard to break in, any other folks out there wear spectacles?  I notice every time I change a prescription it takes a bit for me to not notice a change when I put the new specs on.  Which is breaking in, my brain or the lenses? 

 

I'm glad you enjoyed that. We used to post that sign on the power supplies we ran tubes with. Especially the big ones, with voltage in the 5-figure range. You know, the tubes that we actually burned in. The control panels actually looked something like that picture.

 

Oh, and those power supplies used electrolytic capacitors the size of 5-gallon buckets, with corona balls 2" in diameter, on top of ceramic insulators that looked like something out of a Frankenstein movie. Once in a while those things would blow up too. The repair department hated working on them too, for good reason. You will only forget to discharge a capacitor that big, once. Just once. Now that's what I'd call burn-in LOL.

post #327 of 520
Quote:
Originally Posted by UmustBKidn View Post
 

 

You will only forget to discharge a capacitor that big, once. Just once. Now that's what I'd call burn-in LOL.

 

Non-habit forming, huh?  Hopefully folks were able to learn from the examples of others!  Here's an example of burn-in from the world of chemistry, stuff that can set sand on fire:  http://pipeline.corante.com/archives/2008/02/26/sand_wont_save_you_this_time.php

post #328 of 520

If it can be caught by an electronic device as osciloscope - it`s real.If we cannot measure it with our ears - we can say it may exist or may not.If it can be caught by an electronic device - it doesn`t exist.Or both of the times you have used the electronic devices you haven`t put the necessary settings and the measurement may be corrupted.Who knows...:)

post #329 of 520

Having owned a great number of headphones of which I have listened to out of the box with my test tracks and then put on "burn-in" for a day or two and then listened to again I can from my experience say that the effect of burn in exists to some degree but is not at all present with all headphones. Big changes are rare.

 

Audio Technica CKS77 (a very bass-heavy in-ear) is perhaps the clearest and most dramatic example.  

Out of the box the bass was noticeably uncontrolled and muddy and the overall sound lacked clarity, detail and refinement. I almost though the pre burnt in CKS77 was defective or fake.

Come two days later the bass had tightened up a great deal (still on the boomy side though being incredibly bass-heavy) and the mids and highs had come forward showing more clarity and detail. The biggest change was the tightness of the bass. It would have been fun to compare a pre burnt in CKS77 to a post burnt in CKS77 side by side to really get a true representation of the overall change because the perceived change was so drastic.

From reading other peoples comments it's seem to be a rather consistent aspect of the CKS77 and the CKS line.

 

The thing is that we are influenced and conditioned by past experience and expectations to a bigger degree then we realize.

For example If you listen to a bright and bass light headphone for a long time and then put on a pair of more bassy and smooth headphones of roughly the same technical ability headphones you will feel the new headphones sound muddy and dull, but if you listen to that same headphone for a long enough time and put on the first headphone you will think it sounds anaemic and harsh. Our brain have a remarkable ability of adapting to new circumstances and make it the new baseline of which you form your opinions.

Most of the phenomena called burn in will be people getting used to the new signature to a large degree.

Unless the change is dramatic I doubt peoples ability to really differentiate between real sonic change and their brain changing. I don't really trust my own either.

post #330 of 520

so we've established that burn-in is real, since it can and has been measured by people, that innerfidelity experiment being one, but that most of the psycholgical affect is familiarity affect, cognitive rebiasing if you will. I think this discussion is over. on to more important things like learning how to can these peaches i got from old man jefferies.......

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