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Shure SE846: A New In-Ear Flagship From Shure. Finally! (Impressions p26-28) - Page 64

post #946 of 3040
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spyro View Post

 

No, missing the point (or I'm not explaining myself well).    For the sake of argument say UE900 was a triple driver and came out 4 years ago when TF10 did....and it sounds exactly as it does.   Then let's say today, UE comes out with TF10 and let's just say it is a 4 driver and also sounds exactly as it does.

 

UE could chartge $800 for TF10 !!!   "BIGGER BASS, FAR MORE EXTENDED TREBLE....."   And people would buy it!  You could certainly sell and market the TF10 as a big bold upgrade to UE900.

 

Just trying to point out the power of marketing, perception and persuation.

 

That's a horrible analogy... 

post #947 of 3040
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spyro View Post

 

No, missing the point (or I'm not explaining myself well).    For the sake of argument say UE900 was a triple driver and came out 4 years ago when TF10 did....and it sounds exactly as it does.   Then let's say today, UE comes out with TF10 and let's just say it is a 4 driver and also sounds exactly as it does.

 

UE could chartge $800 for TF10 !!!   "BIGGER BASS, FAR MORE EXTENDED TREBLE....."   And people would buy it!  You could certainly sell and market the TF10 as a big bold upgrade to UE900.

 

Just trying to point out the power of marketing, perception and persuation.


You can't ignore the FACTS...

846 involves alot of innovation instead of merely marketing gimmicks as described in your comments... Not everybody is a fool... Marketing can be misleading or exaggerated at times but they still fall within a reasonable boundary, you can't pull out a 90s mobile phone and claim it to have flashing internet speed, wireless keyboard etc...


Edited by czqdtc - 5/20/13 at 8:02pm
post #948 of 3040
Quote:
Originally Posted by CantScareMe View Post

 

If there's anything like ketchup in your ears, it's probably a bad thing. Wonder which headphone can make your eardrums bleed like that - maybe a belligerant beyer/ultrasone.

 

They make it in front of you using fresh ingredients. Firstly the chef collects a tub of freshly chopped potatoes from his assistants in the large kitchen and places them into the hot oil to fry. Then he gets out the fish, again freshly cut by the folks in the kitchen, and dips it into a batter mix. Very skillfully he transfers this to a separate oil filled section of the fryer, taking extra care to not let anything spill. When all is fried, the excess oil is drained well and good, meaning it is ready to be packaged either in take out or dine in configurations. Needless to say that In all instances the fish is perfectly cooked with an ever-present signature crunch and texture to the batter complementing very well the weighty fulfilling golden chips. 

 

Lets choose the takeout option. So the chef will politely ask how much, if any, salt/vinegar/pepper one would like to be added - you can even (i do anyway) specify the number of times the chef shakes or twists the salt and pepper pots. Finally he asks if you want ketchup. He politely announces this to cost 50p a sachet at which point you, politely of course, tell him to go screw himself. 

 

I guess you now have to pay for the fish and chips, which is fine as you get your moneys worth here. But with the ketchup, come on, it's a rip off.

I am in southern California and it is impossible to get good fish&chips around here - I have been to London a few times and the chip shops are wonderful - the fact that you can actually choose the type of fish is mind boggling to an American. (All we typically get is some sort of chewy white fleshed fish) And try finding a good malt vinegar....

post #949 of 3040
Quote:
Originally Posted by CantScareMe View Post

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by music_4321 View Post

 

(PS Curious about that "very well made" fish & chips, BTW. Seriously)

 

They make it in front of you using fresh ingredients. Firstly the chef collects a tub of freshly chopped potatoes from his assistants in the large kitchen and places them into the hot oil to fry. Then he gets out the fish, again freshly cut by the folks in the kitchen, and dips it into a batter mix. Very skillfully he transfers this to a separate oil filled section of the fryer, taking extra care to not let anything spill. When all is fried, the excess oil is drained well and good, meaning it is ready to be packaged either in take out or dine in configurations. Needless to say that In all instances the fish is perfectly cooked with an ever-present signature crunch and texture to the batter complementing very well the weighty fulfilling golden chips. 

 

Lets choose the takeout option. So the chef will politely ask how much, if any, salt/vinegar/pepper one would like to be added - you can even (i do anyway) specify the number of times the chef shakes or twists the salt and pepper pots. Finally he asks if you want ketchup. He politely announces this to cost 50p a sachet at which point you, politely of course, tell him to go screw himself. 

 

I guess you now have to pay for the fish and chips, which is fine as you get your moneys worth here. But with the ketchup, come on, it's a rip off.

 

Hey, thanks for that! Have just sent you a PM, btw.


Edited by music_4321 - 5/21/13 at 1:49am
post #950 of 3040
I hav no idea what will the 846 sounds like. Hope there will be some passage about it
post #951 of 3040
Quote:
Originally Posted by music_4321 View Post
but I can understand perfectly well why Shure are selling this product for $1,000 (not $1,399 as you conveniently stated in a different post, BTW). 

 

Truth is between you, 1000$ is just preorder price, official MSRP in USA is 1250$

post #952 of 3040
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bina View Post

 

Truth is between you, 1000$ is just preorder price, official MSRP in USA is 1250$

 

Yes, initially the MSRP on the Earphone Solutions site was $1,399 and then it 'went down' to $1,250.

 

Do you honestly think that once the SE846 is released (in the US) Shure will be charging $1,250? I very much doubt it. Often the MSRP is simply a way to get people to think they're getting a discount / bargain (in this case 20% off), when the actual authorised retail price is $,1000 (in the US).

post #953 of 3040

As a kid, my friends and I paid 25 cents to listen to two selections on the jukebox (which sounded better than the table-top radio at home). If the SE846 averages 5 cents-per-song better than the SE535 and I listen to (approximately) 60 songs per day (5 workdays a week), it would justify its $1000 price tag in (a devilish) 66.6 weeks.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Barry Cheddar View Post

6 means you are at least a third evil if you can afford to buy them.

Looks like you were right after all (at least in my case). evil_smiley.gif


Edited by truckdriver - 5/21/13 at 4:30am
post #954 of 3040
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultrazino View Post

What really bothers me is that they deliberately target the top-of-the line price point and shifting their customers and *probably* having nothing to boast instead of inevitable technologic progress.

Of course, we will have to see if Shure really invented revolutionary sound.

 

?

 

No - I mean really ....... ?

 

Look at the announcement, and also the short reviews by those who have had the chance to have a brief listen ..... admittedly they are mostly lost within 60 odd pages of pointless debate about the price.

 

The innovation (which no other IEM is currently using) is the new bass low pass filter .... to directly quote Jude:

 

 

Quote:
To finally move to a three-way configuration, Shure opted for a four-driver design, and innovated a pretty radical low-pass filter design to properly purpose the low-frequency drivers into the roles of subwoofers--True Subwoofer design, as Shure calls it. How this low-pass filter works is by incorporating ten precision-welded stainless steel plates to form a four-inch, high acoustic mass pathway that enables low frequency roll-off beginning around 75Hz. By using this low-pass filter to effectively roll-off unwanted midrange and high frequencies coming from the low-frequency drivers, midrange clarity and detail isn't sacrificed, despite the SE846's ability to deliver very visceral bass

 

Add to that the adjustable filters for the high-end, which whilst not being a technological breakthrough - is a first for Shure on their own IEMs.

 

Then you have the comments from those who have heard them:

 

Jude - rather than requoting him, go back and reread the first post in this thread.

 

Amos - 

Originally Posted by Currawong View Post

Shure SE846

 

For a quick recap, much like a multi-balanced-armature custom IEM, the SE846 has 3 custom-tuned drivers. Their unique take is a very advanced low-pass filter consisting of 10 very tiny and intricately carved plates that route the bass through what is effectively a long tube. The result is very clean, detailed bass, though a bit much for my tastes. The rest of the sound, using the "balanced" filters was, for me, spot-on, with nothing too forward, such as the treble (my frequent gripe with Japanese IEMs for example), but less dark and wooly-sounding than the SE535s. They didn't have the other filters to try unfortunately. For those of you who have tried universal versions of various customs, they are like a universal JH-16 in effect, but I felt less V-shaped in sound than the TG334s. Other than being, to my ears, about right in strength for the varieties of music I like (mostly acoustic) the excellent low-pass bass filter left the mids and treble, and thus vocals and instruments to be delivered cleanly and beautifully. It was rather like the first time I heard the Audeze LCD-2s, where the bass was simply so much better than I had experienced with any other headphones before. It was the absense of negatives in the sound that was so surprising*.  

 
What is more, the sound was very good even straight out of my iPhone, if, not surprisingly, clearer and tighter sounding out of my HP-P1/Pico Power rig. In that, I have to thank arnaud here who tried them with me and wrote his impressions. We were lucky to get in before they brought out the 3 minute egg timers (the queue to hear them during the day was very long). A good summary would be: If there was anything you didn't like about the SE535s, it has been fixed with the SE846 -- but very sorry about your wallet. Now if they have a filter which reduces the bass a bit, I'll take a pair..

 

We get that you think they're too expensive.  You've made your point - please move on and let it go.  And perhaps let those of us who are very interested in reading more actual impressions not have to continually wade through the endlessly repeated clutter.

 

Please.

post #955 of 3040

We need more impressions I reckon. I shall contact Shure immediately and say "The Head-Fi thread on your 846s has become a hotbed of arguments about the price. Can I borrow a pair so I can have something to write to shut these guys up for a while?" biggrin.gif

post #956 of 3040
Just curious how is the sound comparison between SE846 vs SE215? Which one has a wider sound stage, clearer separation and deeper bass?
post #957 of 3040

I haven't heard either but the SE846 must be MUCH better considering what they cost!  atsmile.gif

 

 

Price in UK is £949 inc. VAT. Available this summer.


Edited by dwizard - 5/21/13 at 5:33am
post #958 of 3040
Quote:
Originally Posted by dwizard View Post

I haven't heard either but the SE846 must be MUCH better considering what they cost!  atsmile.gif

Price in UK is £949 inc. VAT. Available this summer.

SE 215 costs £80 but SE846 costs almost 12X more.

I would expect SE846 sounds at least 10X better than SE215.

Otherwise no reason for SHURE to sell SE846 at such amazing high price!
post #959 of 3040

Shure never promised a “revolutionary new sound” but simply a new low-pass filter that they refer too as “ground-breaking” (in its implementation).

 

And since the term “X better” (or times better) doesn't actually mean anything, I'd say the SE846 will sound “100X better” than Shure's own SE215. That makes the SE846 a "super bargain".rolleyes.gif

post #960 of 3040
Quote:
Originally Posted by cyberalpha11 View Post


SE 215 costs £80 but SE846 costs almost 12X more.

I would expect SE846 sounds at least 10X better than SE215.

Otherwise no reason for SHURE to sell SE846 at such amazing high price!

Honestly. with the way you ask for compares and product spec questions that have been posted in almost every thread along than this nonsense, I have to ask. Are you trolling?

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