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Massive CD Purchase

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

I'm about to order a bunch of CDs. Should cost me around $450.

New stuff by these bands that I have other stuff by:
Amplifier (out)
Karnivool (date not quite announced yet)
Leprous (May 28, looking forward to this more than anything)
Tesseract (May 28)
Ours (early June)
Dead Letter Circus (date not quite announced yet)
Cynic (date not quite announced yet)

New or existing stuff by these bands that I don't own anything else by:
Supermachine
Disperse
Decortica
Palms
Bring Me the Horizon
Periphery
Exeter
Constants
Stone Sour
Switchkicker
Shadow Theory
Moving Mountains
The Contortionist
Volbeat
Junius
The God Machine
Omega Experiment
Skyharbor
Ihsahn
Voyager
Vuvuzela
Wisdom of Crowds
Lykke Li
In the Silence
Uneven Structure
Anciients
Intronaut
Feersum Ennjin
Aeon Zen
Emptyself
Prisma
Khoma
OSI
Ghost B.C.
O'Brother


Old / existing stuff by these bands that I already have stuff by:
Black Heart Procession
Islands
Baroness
Riverside
Cog
Anathema
Soundgarden
The Life and Times
Katatonia
Aerogramme
Devon Townsend


Three questions:
1. Any thoughts / opinions on these bands (good or bad), recommendations, or additional music I should consider based on these listed?
2. Anyone do something similar, ordering a large amount of music at once, a lot of which you've never heard? What do / did you think?
3. Anyone else still buy Redbook Audio CDs? Or are most people doing Digital Files, Pandora, or Vinyl now?

Thanks!

post #2 of 14

My opinion.... You're mad!

 

I still buy CDs and willcontinue to do so until they stop making them, or HD quality downloads becomes mainstream. But I think more than a handful at a time is about as much as I can handle.

 

I can't comment on the groups as I can only recognise about 3 of them. Must be getting old....

post #3 of 14
I order large amount of cd's like you are. Some pay off and some dont. I have no recomendations though since I only recognize like 1 group off that list. I did big binges like that when I wanted to get a bunch of blues and also when I wanted a bunch of dubstep.
post #4 of 14
Seems rather insane to me. At the very least get a month subscription to a service like Rhapsody. Cant probably get a free month. Then spend the 30 days listening to everything and decide want you want. Who knows. You may end up keeping the service. I know for my family we love it.
post #5 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nepenthe View Post

Three questions:
1. Any thoughts / opinions on these bands (good or bad), recommendations, or additional music I should consider based on these listed?
2. Anyone do something similar, ordering a large amount of music at once, a lot of which you've never heard? What do / did you think?
3. Anyone else still buy Redbook Audio CDs? Or are most people doing Digital Files, Pandora, or Vinyl now?

 

  1. Sorry, I don't recognize any of the artists you listed.
  2. I've never purchased that much music at once....unless it's a boxset.
  3. Still buying CDs....already over 100 new CDs purchased this year.
post #6 of 14

1.  The God Machine were a criminally underappreciated band from the 90's.  I loved them.  They only had two albums because of their bass player's untimely passing.  I recommend getting Scenes from the Second Storey first, and if you like it then try to track down their second one, which will be harder to find.  The rest of your list I'm either totally unfamiliar with, or not enough to make comment worthwhile.

 

2.  In my considerable experience, a purchase of the size you're talking about is almost definitely a bad idea for numerous reasons.  Mainly that there's no way to give adequate listening time to so many albums in a reasonable period of time, so why not cut the big buy into four separate chunks, and space them out, buying more when you feel you need it?  Also, with a physical music collection, which takes up space, when you build up a lot you realize how important quality control is.  You don't want to end up with a bunch of stuff that you don't really listen to, or wish you'd bought in another format, or whatever.  Slower is better.  I also highly recomment using one of the numerous avenues available to listen to anything you're considering buying at least once or twice before you buy it.  There's no reason not to in this day and age, and there's no reason not to as long as it doesn't make you support musicians less. 

 

3.  Yes, I still do buy CD's.  Vinyl is my format of choice, but in many cases CD's are what I go with for various reasons.  Large collections that would cost so much they'd never make it to a vinyl release, stuff that's way cheaper on CD, stuff that I tend to listen to more in situations where I wouldn't want to have to go flip a side..... there's a consistent amount of stuff that I go with redbook on.   

Anyway, either way I'm glad to see there are still some younger people that do want to support music by paying for it. 

post #7 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nepenthe View Post

I'm about to order a bunch of CDs. Should cost me around $450.



Three questions:
1. Any thoughts / opinions on these bands (good or bad), recommendations, or additional music I should consider based on these listed?
2. Anyone do something similar, ordering a large amount of music at once, a lot of which you've never heard? What do / did you think?
3. Anyone else still buy Redbook Audio CDs? Or are most people doing Digital Files, Pandora, or Vinyl now?

Thanks!


1.  Red text: The new Amplifier isn't as good as Octopus or their self-titled release, but still worth picking up, especially if you're getting it directly from the band's website. I like Dead Letter Circus and Karnivool, although they sound very, very similar.  You might also try Deadsoul Tribe, along those same prog lines.

 

Green text: Of those, OSI is definitely enjoyable, as is their sister project Chroma Key.  The rest are: who?

 

Blue: Baroness is up and down but on the whole is good Southern metal.  Any Soundgarden before King Animal is good; Badmotorfinger is the classic and must-have.  Devin Townsend as Ocean Machine's Biomech is his best, IMO.  Huge soundstages, layers upon layers of down-tuned guitars and some good writing.  The medieval motet inspired twist at the end of "Voices in the Fan" makes it my favorite song of his.  I'd buy the CDs of whoever he got to sing that.  The hall acoustics alone are amazing.

 

2.  I placed a $1k order with Amazon last week.  New for this purchase is a bunch of sludge and stoner metal.  Got a bunch of Sleep, Electric Wizard and others like old Kyuss that I didn't have already.  I love being surprised by stuff I took a chance on.  I do this a few times a year.

 

3. See above.  CDs still play when I lose my internet connection.  Plus I want to rip everything to WAV for my server.  I am a bit older, and love the sensory stimulation of having things I can touch or collect: books, CDs, whatever.  I think that tactile sense stopped a bit with younger generations.  Not a bad thing, necessarily, just more of an observation.

post #8 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by gtcharlie View Post
Seems rather insane to me. At the very least get a month subscription to a service like Rhapsody. Can probably get a free month. Then spend the 30 days listening to everything and decide want you want. Who knows. You may end up keeping the service. I know for my family we love it.

My girlfriend had Rhapsody and we were not too happy with it. Seemed to be constant problems syncing things up, and I don't think the selection would be up to par for my purposes. I mean I understand the "try before you buy" idea that you're proposing, and I did listen to Amazon samples for almost all of these. A lot of people I know are pretty happy with Spotify.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by soundboy View Post

Still buying CDs....already over 100 new CDs purchased this year.

Nice!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by s m @ View Post

1.  The God Machine were a criminally underappreciated band from the 90's.  I loved them.  They only had two albums because of their bass player's untimely passing.  I recommend getting Scenes from the Second Storey first, and if you like it then try to track down their second one, which will be harder to find.  The rest of your list I'm either totally unfamiliar with, or not enough to make comment worthwhile.

 

2.  In my considerable experience, a purchase of the size you're talking about is almost definitely a bad idea for numerous reasons.  Mainly that there's no way to give adequate listening time to so many albums in a reasonable period of time, so why not cut the big buy into four separate chunks, and space them out, buying more when you feel you need it?  Also, with a physical music collection, which takes up space, when you build up a lot you realize how important quality control is.  You don't want to end up with a bunch of stuff that you don't really listen to, or wish you'd bought in another format, or whatever.  Slower is better.  I also highly recommend using one of the numerous avenues available to listen to anything you're considering buying at least once or twice before you buy it.  There's no reason not to in this day and age, and there's no reason not to as long as it doesn't make you support musicians less. 

 

3.  Yes, I still do buy CD's.  Vinyl is my format of choice, but in many cases CD's are what I go with for various reasons.  Large collections that would cost so much they'd never make it to a vinyl release, stuff that's way cheaper on CD, stuff that I tend to listen to more in situations where I wouldn't want to have to go flip a side..... there's a consistent amount of stuff that I go with redbook on.   

Anyway, either way I'm glad to see there are still some younger people that do want to support music by paying for it. 

I actually had The God Machine's first album, when I was younger. But I wasn't really in a place where I could appreciate it. Ended up selling it for pizza or beer money as I recall. Now I want it back. Both albums are readily available on Amazon right now.

 

I appreciate the note about quality control. Purging stuff is as important as discovering stuff. I'll consider splitting the order up into four chunks (which would help coincide with the future release dates of some stuff as well).

 

I definitely like to pay for music. But I'm not sure I'm really the younger person you're referring to -- I'm 38. During the Napster years (think April and May of 2001 when the big rush was on), I sampled a lot of stuff. I almost always ended up purchasing the CD version of stuff that I enjoyed. The MP3s are long gone but I am glad to own the CDs.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Smeckles View Post


1.  Red text: The new Amplifier isn't as good as Octopus or their self-titled release, but still worth picking up, especially if you're getting it directly from the band's website. I like Dead Letter Circus and Karnivool, although they sound very, very similar.  You might also try Deadsoul Tribe, along those same prog lines.

 

Green text: Of those, OSI is definitely enjoyable, as is their sister project Chroma Key.  The rest are: who?

 

Blue: Baroness is up and down but on the whole is good Southern metal.  Any Soundgarden before King Animal is good; Badmotorfinger is the classic and must-have.  Devin Townsend as Ocean Machine's Biomech is his best, IMO.  Huge soundstages, layers upon layers of down-tuned guitars and some good writing.  The medieval motet inspired twist at the end of "Voices in the Fan" makes it my favorite song of his.  I'd buy the CDs of whoever he got to sing that.  The hall acoustics alone are amazing.

 

2.  I placed a $1k order with Amazon last week.  New for this purchase is a bunch of sludge and stoner metal.  Got a bunch of Sleep, Electric Wizard and others like old Kyuss that I didn't have already.  I love being surprised by stuff I took a chance on.  I do this a few times a year.

 

3. See above.  CDs still play when I lose my internet connection.  Plus I want to rip everything to WAV for my server.  I am a bit older, and love the sensory stimulation of having things I can touch or collect: books, CDs, whatever.  I think that tactile sense stopped a bit with younger generations.  Not a bad thing, necessarily, just more of an observation.

Amplifier: yep, I've heard that. Too laid back I've read. But still an automatic purchase for me. I have heard they are still at work on another album, more of a sequel to The Octopus.

 

I agree, DLC and Karnivool have a similar sound, at least comparing the last records. The new DLC is supposed to have a slightly more electronic edge and I have no idea where the new Karnivool will end up (I'm hoping it ends up with sprawling, multi-part, 10 minute songs with some real heaviness at times).

 

I've got The January Tree by Deadsoul Tribe. Actually, The Shadow Theory (on my list) is Devon Graves' new project.

 

Looking forward to OSI, not sure about Chroma Key.

 

Actually, I was going to get the newest Soundgarden. I've got everything else by them.

 

Thanks for the recommendation on Ocean Machine!

 

$1K, nice. I agree, I live for discovering gems without a lot of preconceived notions.

 

I enjoy CDs for the feeling of permanence and ownership, the collection / wall of music, the sound quality, the art / notes / lyric sheets, and because I usually stick with listening to albums in their entirety (as opposed to random cuts from my whole collection). I also like getting stuff in the mail. There's more to it than clicking 'download' and waiting five minutes for a set of files to appear.

 

Thanks everyone!


Edited by Nepenthe - 5/12/13 at 10:26am
post #9 of 14
Thread Starter 

First review is in for the new Leprous:

 

http://echoesanddust.com/2013/05/leprous-coal/

 

“The album begins with ‘Foe’, all stabbing drums and guitars and a soaring vocal line that ends with a collage of vocal harmonies and melodies weaving in and out like the chorus line of an opera. In 5 minutes, Leprous have played a piece of truly progressive music. Something that challenges you and makes you think, almost like you’re having to play catch-up with the band and the directions they are taking you in. Wondrous stuff.”

 

“There is something… unsettling about the combination of throat-wrenching screams, drums, guitar drones and a wistful violin melody all mashed together. It’s the perfect end to an album that I cannot do justice to by giving you a track-by-track review.”

 

“What Leprous have done here on Coal is progressive in its truest definition; that is, to move forward, to evolve and to continue exploration. Each track has so many elements, so many twists and turns that it’s breathtaking in scope and imagination. Voices weave in and out, guitars are crunchingly heavy one minute then delicately fragile the next. I can’t begin to imagine how these little beauties are created. And to be honest with you, I don’t care. The finished product of whatever journey was taken to get there is utterly spellbinding and glorious.”

post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by gtcharlie
Seems rather insane to me. At the very least get a month subscription to a service like Rhapsody. Can probably get a free month. Then spend the 30 days listening to everything and decide want you want. Who knows. You may end up keeping the service. I know for my family we love it.
My girlfriend had Rhapsody and we were not too happy with it. Seemed to be constant problems syncing things up, and I don't think the selection would be up to par for my purposes. I mean I understand the "try before you buy" idea that you're proposing, and I did listen to Amazon samples for almost all of these. A lot of people I know are pretty happy with Spotify.

Understood. I was speaking more to any streaming service rather than Rhapsody specifically. I will admit I have had my share of technical difficulties with the service but more on the iPhone app service than anything else. And a good point about some of those bands not being available although I have been constantly impressed by the breadth of their catalogue.

Enjoy your new music!
post #11 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nepenthe View Post

I actually had The God Machine's first album, when I was younger. But I wasn't really in a place where I could appreciate it. Ended up selling it for pizza or beer money as I recall. Now I want it back. Both albums are readily available on Amazon right now.

 

I definitely like to pay for music. But I'm not sure I'm really the younger person you're referring to -- I'm 38. During the Napster years (think April and May of 2001 when the big rush was on), I sampled a lot of stuff. I almost always ended up purchasing the CD version of stuff that I enjoyed. The MP3s are long gone but I am glad to own the CDs.

 

Ha ha ha ha... Hilarious.  You're actually (a bit) older than I am.  Carry on, then.  I guess I'm so set in my own habits that I assumed that anyone asking for advice on music buying had to be a youngster.  I'm a jackass, ha ha.  Also, pizza and beer money: Mistake, but LOL. 

 

Quote:

I enjoy CDs for the feeling of permanence and ownership, the collection / wall of music, the sound quality, the art / notes / lyric sheets, and because I usually stick with listening to albums in their entirety (as opposed to random cuts from my whole collection). I also like getting stuff in the mail. There's more to it than clicking 'download' and waiting five minutes for a set of files to appear.

 

Also funny.  This perfectly encapsulates all of the reasons why I need to buy music.  Aside from the other obvious one, which of course is the desire to support bands I like so they can continue to do what they do without having to miss practice to work 9 to 5. 

 

Anyway, let us know what you end up getting and how it goes for you.

post #12 of 14
Thread Starter 

It's 109 days later. How did I do? Not very well based on all the "didn't buy" items.

 

I had a three week in-home audition of Adam Audio Column Mk3 Active speakers (that I couldn't buy in the end due to employment circumstances), which provided voluptuous detail to everything I listened to, so everything I heard while they were in my possession is probably unfairly getting an extra star based on how euphoric it sounded while I had these bad boys.


Amplifier - didn't buy
Karnivool - Asymmetry - just wading in now, about half the songs are excellent, finding myself wishing there were more like The Refusal and fewer like the whiny emo
Leprous - Coal - has fallen by the wayside, my impressions from my first two listens were not good, seems like a step back from the shockingly creative desert island disc Bilateral
Tesseract - Altered State - I admit I haven't listened to this too much, it might be the vocals or the sameyness that put me off, will circle back to it later
Ours - didn't buy (was put off by some comments about terrible sound, which is a shame, Distorted Lullabies is one of my all-time favorites
Dead Letter Circus - didn't buy (waiting for the price to come down from $30)
Cynic - not out yet

Supermachine - didn't buy

Disperse - Living Mirrors - fairly interesting so far

Decortica - didn't buy
Palms - Palms - more mellow than expected

Bring Me the Horizon- didn't buy
Periphery - didn't buy
Exeter - didn't buy
Constants - If Tomorrow the War - I kind of dig this!
Stone Sour - House of Gold & Bones Part One - has a slight radio / Linkin Park / dudebro / **** rock feel to it, reminds me of Atomship a bit

Switchkicker - didn't buy
Shadow Theory - not what I was expecting (based on DST) but a fun listen so far

Moving Mountains - Waves - dream-post-rockish, enjoyable but not ground-breaking

The Contortionist - didn't buy
Volbeat - didn't buy
Junius - didn't buy - Reports From the Threshold of Death - excellent suite of thematically coherent goth rock, ordered their previous album as well!

The God Machine - didn't buy
Omega Experiment - didn't buy
Skyharbor - didn't buy
Ihsahn - didn't buy
Voyager - The Hollow Choir - actually communicated with Josh Benash, who provided me with lossless files! love this whimsical chamber pop

Vuvuzela - didn't buy

Wisdom of Crowds - didn't buy

Lykke Li - didn't buy

In the Silence - A Fair Dream Gone Mad - for fans of Katatonia; good, not great

Uneven Structure - didn't buy

Anciients - didn't buy

Intronaut - Habitual Levitations - bought and enjoyed this sludgey, driving, towering mess

Feersum Ennjin - Feersum Ennjin - like a heavier Lusk, inventive prog/alt rock

Aeon Zen - didn't buy

Emptyself - didn't buy

Prisma - didn't buy

Khoma - The Second Wave - excellent heavy indie rock, great vocals

OSI - Blood - great sounding, cool soft-metal

Ghost B.C. - didn't buy

O'Brother - Garden Window - WOW!! is all I can say, *fantastic* album and the follow up Disillusion was just released and is on a truck somewhere on the way to my house as well... one of the best finds of the past year

Black Heart Procession - didn't buy

Islands - didn't buy

Baroness - didn't buy

Riverside - Shrine of New Generation Slaves - lovely prog metal with nice sound

Cog - didn't buy (waiting for the Just Visiting compilation to show up on eBay, meanwhile the boys are trying out a new sound with their project The Occupants)

Anathema - didn't buy

Soundgarden - didn't buy

The Life and Times - didn't buy (did see a show though; I already have all the full-length albums, don't have the EPs, they're working on some new songs for a new album)

Katatonia - Dead End Kings - didn't like it as much as Night is the New Day, but I might like it better as the acoustic / ambient remix version due out soon

Aerogramme - didn't buy

Devon Townsend - didn't buy

 

In addition, I also bought these:

 

Votum - Harvest Moon - competent, enjoyable prog / alt metal with clean vocals

Abigail's Ghost - d_letion - actually reminds of The Dismemberment Plan if Andy Yorke from The Unbelievable Truth was providing vocals and they embraced a metal side, quite good

Dianoya - Lidocaine - angular indie metal

Enochian Theory - Evolution: Creatio Ex Nihilio - outstanding progressive post-rock

Enochian Theory - Life... And All It Entails - liked the other one so much I had to get this one too, a grand album!

North Atlantic Oscillation - Fog Electric - electronica with Beach Boys vocals, The Besnard Lakes but with more variety

Kingcrow - In Crescendo - high dynamic range prog rock that's best when it hops around to a variety of song structures

Gazpacho - Missa Atropos - meeellloowww, sounds a bit like a combo of Aereogramme and Radiohead

Return to Earth - Captains of Industry - can't tell yet

Jericco - Nice to See You EP - whets the appetite for the full-length, a bit raw

Shaolin Death Squad - Intelligent Design - genre hoppers from the town where I lived for eight years, this is actually a REALLY nice-sound album

Jolly - The Audio Guide to Happiness Part 1 - enjoyed some songs on this quite a bit, enough to buy the sequel...

Jolly - The Audio Guide to Happiness Part 2 - ...which I didn't enjoy as much (partly because the production / mastering is just AWFUL, worse than the first by far)

Soen - Cognitive - pleasant Tool-lite, reminds me of Feersum Ennjin or maybe A Perfect Circle, a grower

Traverser - Telemetry - got it for a buck, reasonably good alt rock that bears some repeats

A Pale Horse Named Death - Lay My Soul to Waste - disappointingly ****-rockish with too-simple song structures

 

And I've added these to the list:

 

Blackfield - IV - due soon

Lesser Key - guy from Lusk and Feersum Ennjin

Ashes Divide - new album soon

The Ghost Apparatus - the ghost of Rishloo

Aqueduct - finally a new album after seven years

Scarymother - Tai Laeo - old, waiting for eBay to hit, got to have it for Andrew Gillespie's voice

Battle Circus - Muse Absolution-type anthems

Washed Out - Paracosm - psychedelic shoegaze

Tanner Merritt - lead singer of O'Brother's solo album, MUST HAVE


Edited by Nepenthe - 8/26/13 at 3:55pm
post #13 of 14

Wow- a big investment for a lot of music at once. As some others have said, not the way I go about it for the reasons already stated...

 

1. I do not recognize most of the bands on your list, so no feedback there.

 

2. I have never ordered that much music at once and certainly not of bands I have never heard...

 

3. I always buy the Redbook CDs for my music and then rip ALAC for my server. I do keep the CDs although I almost never spin them anymore. I must be old school on the collecting music thing...

 

Just a suggestion to get the most for your money...

 

I use Pandora for finding and reviewing new music and bands I am considering, seeing which I like, then purchase the CD used from Amazon and occasionally Ebay for about 1/4-1/3 of new retail price (save the rare and long out of print titles). This approach has really reduced the amount of bunk music I have and has allowed me a much vaster and deeper collection of music for the scratch spent.

 

Best of luck with the monster buy- you have months of listening to do!

post #14 of 14

I like to listen to an album once or twice before buying it.  

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