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Sony MDR MA900 Impressions Thread - Page 51

post #751 of 2243
The ma900 does have subbass. Its not overly loud but it's there.
post #752 of 2243
I know that. I'm referring to the sub bass comparable to the midbass and up. The sub bass is rolled off, which happens on every fully open dynamic headphone ever. (Prove to me that I'm wrong here, I'd love to see it). Sub bass can't reach our ears at the same volume when so much of the air that the drivers are pushing out are escaping through the open design. With closed headphones, that's not a problem because all sound enters directly into our ears, with little to no leakage/dissipation. Planars are different because they can push a substantial amount of air. Much more than dynamics could ever hope to achieve. That's why headphones like the HE-400 and LCD2 have really linear bass, from sub bass to the mid bass, even with their somewhat open design.

The more open a dynamic headphone is, the less sub bass you're gonna have. The MA900 is as OPEN as it gets. So much, there is a huge cavity between the driver and the pads. That's an obvious indicator that sub bass is going to be rolled off quite a bit.

Fact of the matter is, if you want sub bass to even match mid bass... get a closed headphone or a planar. Don't ever expect to get good sub bass from an open dynamic. Some can be tuned to have a large amount of sub bass, and it will still lag behind it's mid bass, save for ruining the sound completely.

Sub bass we get from a closed dynamic is more air pressure than an actual tone. Because it's air pressure, what happens once there is a leak point? The pressure escapes, and we barely register it as sub bass.
Edited by Mad Lust Envy - 11/25/13 at 4:14am
post #753 of 2243
Of course it rolls off but the way you described it was like it reached 80hz and then just completely dropped.
post #754 of 2243

Sub-bass means below the lowest note of a bass guitar.

 

Most people who use the term have never heard it outside of the movie theater.

post #755 of 2243

Lugbug1 is an experienced listener, so I think some of his observations must be due to one or more of:

 

* Not allowing any burn-in time at all (some dynamic drivers - such as Shure - are more grainy out of the box)

 

* Not trying my mod of a piece of tape to hold the sliders (although yeah, the quality should be better so that you should not have to do).
 

* Reading other comments and so did not plug it into one of his Kenwood or Pioneer amps

 

* Not moving the ear pieces up and down or backwards or forwards a little, to get the best response.

post #756 of 2243

^^ You really don't want him to plug into one of those vintage amps. That is unless he likes to see smoke coming from the drivers. :eek:  ...seriously. 

post #757 of 2243

Question, what do you guys think about the Vali with the ma900? Too much power?

post #758 of 2243

Isn't the MA900 somewhat sensitive? If so, I'd think that could pair poorly considering the noise floor on the Vali.

post #759 of 2243
Quote:
Originally Posted by kstuart View Post
 

Sub-bass means below the lowest note of a bass guitar.

 

Most people who use the term have never heard it outside of the movie theater.

"Sub-bass sounds are those approximately below 60 Hz and extending downward."

Quote:
Originally Posted by kstuart View Post

* Not allowing any burn-in time at all (some dynamic drivers - such as Shure - are more grainy out of the box)

These don't need burn in... at all.  I have had 2 ma900s and they sounded the same the whole way.  That's all Ill say about burn in.

 

 

 

The MA900 starts to roll off at around 50hz, and is heard noticeably to around 30hz.  The subbass is there.  I just lower the mid-bass with an eq.

post #760 of 2243
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trunks159 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kstuart View Post
 

Sub-bass means below the lowest note of a bass guitar.

 

Most people who use the term have never heard it outside of the movie theater.

"Sub-bass sounds are those approximately below 60 Hz and extending downward."

This makes no sense "Sub-" means below, and Bass are notes starting at around 40 hz.

 

But I guess if Wikipedia says so, it must be right. ;)

post #761 of 2243
Quote:
Originally Posted by MattTCG View Post
 

^^ You really don't want him to plug into one of those vintage amps. That is unless he likes to see smoke coming from the drivers. :eek:  ...seriously. 


With all due respect, Matt, that is what I was referring to as Lugbug1 "reading the comments".

 

I use the MA900 mostly on my 300 watt RMS per channel Kenwood.

 

The MA900 has that impedance matching network, so you can use with anything that has a dedicated headphone jack.

 

If you use the headphone jack of a vintage amp, then they always have resistors in series, so there is no problem.  Yes, a sensitive headphone will end up using more of the lower end of the knob, but it still is usable.   And bass quality is always great with the Kenwood.

post #762 of 2243

He was probably thinking out of the speaker taps LOL

post #763 of 2243
I may be misunderstanding you but if bass starts below 40hz, then what does that make sounds at 80hz? Lower mids lol.

Subbass can mean whatever it means technically but the connotation is that it's sounds below around 50-60hz.
post #764 of 2243

Ok I'm back to just to be polite to a few posts:) Don't lynch me!!

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hailin View Post
 

 

Thanks LugBug1 for your review we all need a reminder now and then that everyone hears differently. 

Thankyou :) And that is so true! I would also add, that although I was comparing them to mid price headphones (K701/HD600, I was only doing this because of the hype surrounding these that they are as good (or better) to some folks. But taste is everything in this hobby.   

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by kstuart View Post
 

Lugbug1 is an experienced listener, so I think some of his observations must be due to one or more of:

 

* Not allowing any burn-in time at all (some dynamic drivers - such as Shure - are more grainy out of the box)

 

* Not trying my mod of a piece of tape to hold the sliders (although yeah, the quality should be better so that you should not have to do).
 

* Reading other comments and so did not plug it into one of his Kenwood or Pioneer amps

 

* Not moving the ear pieces up and down or backwards or forwards a little, to get the best response.

Burn in is something that is so hard to prove... I defo believe in warming up any audio component, but that is different. I find most components sound better after at least half an hour. But there is also a sound difference with some headphone pads too as they mold to your face over time and cause more of a seal. The reason why I don't believe in burn in with moving coil dynamic drivers, is that something moving through air shouldn't be affected over time like other mechanical moving parts where friction is involved. But this is such a grey area and still can't be proved by science. So its always going to be a subjective experience whether true or not. And I believe you my friend!  

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MattTCG View Post
 

^^ You really don't want him to plug into one of those vintage amps. That is unless he likes to see smoke coming from the drivers. :eek:  ...seriously. 

I did try them with my Nad integrate as this has a low mute button. Just to see how well the impedance compensator worked. To be fair the sound character didn't change much, only darker because of the sig of the amp. But the volume level went right down. This means they weren't getting fed enough current and I would be close to frying them If I turned them right up! 

 

 

 

Also just to say.. 

 

I think a whole day spent with a headphone is enough time to evaluate it. It may not be enough time for it to grow on you... And I certainly don't dislike it!  It's just it was not above average for me (so unfortunately 2 stars it had to be, because 3 stars would have been above average) Also, I'm not a gamer or watch films. I'm a music lover. 20 years of listening and collecting classical music (my dads fault). I'm also admittedly becoming more of an audiophile snob hahah.. But this comes with the hobby I'm afraid. And owning a headphone such as the HD800's for the best part of a year is bound to have an impact on how you judge SQ no matter how much you try to be objective in regards to price performance etc with other cans. So in that respect I may very well have been unfair to the Sony's subconsciously.

 

I also bought the K701's (3rd time) at the same time as the MA900's and for me it was no contest. But as always its down to taste in sq. Music preference is also a very important factor. Amps, sources etc goes without saying in regards to how a headphone will perform as well. The Necosoundlabs amp I used with the MA900 is a fabulous amp with nothing but stellar reviews. I have upgraded opamps that make it even smoother than what it is stock and it is a very neutral sounding SS amp. Its as good as any Schiit amps I've heard. So I don't believe my amp had any part in them not being winners with me. 

 

So I'll just sit here on one side of the tree with my K701's on, while you guys sit on the other side with your MA900's. We all love a nice big soundstage! Only you guys love your more forward mids and like my extension and less forward sound. Happy days!!    

post #765 of 2243

I dont think few negative impressions changes anything for me on MA900 ..and not even worth repeating their negative impressions here...  I'm also a classical fan and I prefer ma900 over 880,598 and most of the AKG lineup including 701..  but I dont bash the other headphones that I dont like on their appreciation threads... if you dont like, move on ... thanks..

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