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How I spoiled hi-fi for myself - Page 6

post #76 of 92
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoupRKnowva View Post


but arent newtonian interactions just an aproximation, albet a very good one, too?

Very true. But the point is, even if you're working with very simple laws, you can get wicked systems of differential equations in simple situations of which the analytic solution does not even exist. Kinda sucks if you ask me.
post #77 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tilpo View Post


Very true. But the point is, even if you're working with very simple laws, you can get wicked systems of differential equations in simple situations of which the analytic solution does not even exist. Kinda sucks if you ask me.


i dunno, you complained about math being an approximation when you were using a method that was an approximation to begin with...seemed weird to me. Wouldn't using an accurate method to begin with have been better?

post #78 of 92
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoupRKnowva View Post


i dunno, you complained about math being an approximation when you were using a method that was an approximation to begin with...seemed weird to me. Wouldn't using an accurate method to begin with have been better?

No, it would not.

And if you want to know why, take a few physics advanced physics courses, and you'll realize that almost all physical laws rest on a lot of approximations . Everything in physics is one big approximation, and if you wouldn't use such approximations, then it would be close to impossible to work with; it would be too complicated.

Furthermore most approximations are accurate to within at least a millionth of a percent, and not making such approximations when they do in fact simplify the math would be stupid. The only reason not to use an approximation is if the lost information is essential -- or at the very least significant -- to what you're calculating, which proves very often not to be the case.

Still, it's sad we have to make such approximations, but it's an unfortunate truth.

Again, this is not really relevant to the discussion.
post #79 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tilpo View Post

Again, this is not really relevant to the discussion.

 

Ha!  See how easy it is?  wink.gif

post #80 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by DefQon View Post

You know what else is funny that's popped up to my head. I can safely say that a good 80% of head-fiers here are more concerned about there gear than music itself. Just look at all the people with multiple rigs and constantly upgrading. 

I've reached this realization about my self just in this last week. I've been thinking more about the soundstaging, fidelity, clarity and separation of my music more than what the music conveys itself. I found myself changing songs again and again just to listen to how each headphone preformed its task. Over the last few days I've spent about 5 hours a day just sitting back with my computer on the switch user account screen listening to album after album. It makes you realize the bigger picture and enjoyment to be had that you can sometimes miss when gear goes beyond a means to an end and becomes a pure ascending obsession.

post #81 of 92
I don't care about gear anymore, I have headphones that aren't crap and speakers that I just listen to music on, soundstage doesn't help depression but music does. tongue.gif
post #82 of 92

I applaud the two above posts but when I last praised a poster for  saying the same I was heavily criticized. Your right music helps depression if there was no music in the World there would be a lot more deaths.

post #83 of 92

There's music and then ther's Music. Music can also damage people, and in cases of deep sadness or depressions it can sometimes be detrimental in the sense that it can cause a bit more self-indulgence, making things worse, so to speak.

 

But, there's also the very real healing power of music, but that's a more complex subject. Liking music is one thing. Needing music is another. Sometimes a 'music fast' is necessary.

post #84 of 92

I don't agree with a "music fast". I never tire from music and when you say there is "music and music" People buy the music they LIKE . I am not a jazz fan so I wouldn't buy jazz CDS/download. But I like all other music from classical to 50s US rock n Roll to the blues etc If music you like doesn't sound good on your equipment buy or build something else with a higher fidelity. I have worked in psychiatric hospitals and music does help patients. Yes if the patient is so depressed that they have  attempted suicide  and counseling doesn't help then drugs have to be used but I look on music as a  positive "drug" that helps lift the Spirit and takes away a lot of cares of the World . It depends how much you "get into music" or how much you "let yourself go" and become part of the music.It isn't just a tune to me. 

post #85 of 92

Perhaps I should have said, "But, there's also the very real healing power of music, but that's a much more complex subject", instead of "but that's a more complex subject".

post #86 of 92

A very refreshing thread. Thanks for sharing.

post #87 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by music_4321 View Post

There's music and then ther's Music. Music can also damage people, and in cases of deep sadness or depressions it can sometimes be detrimental in the sense that it can cause a bit more self-indulgence, making things worse, so to speak.

 

But, there's also the very real healing power of music, but that's a more complex subject. Liking music is one thing. Needing music is another. Sometimes a 'music fast' is necessary.

 

I don't agree with a music fast. I do believe in taking a break from certain genres to discover and enjoy other types of music. I suffer from schizophrenia so for me music has been like a comforting companion and lover all my life. It does things on a positive level very few other things in life do reminding me of the good within me and in others when am feeling a bit stressed at the end of a rough day. I agree music can also damage if one is not careful to keep things in perspective and filter out the negative. I love my industrial music but switching to some Yanni, Brian Eno or Belafonte can be exhilarating in its change of pace.

 

Variety is the spice of life as well as moderation to enjoy the most things.


Edited by Hellbishop - 8/24/13 at 5:10pm
post #88 of 92

Well, if you appreciate (some of) the music of Mr Brian Eno, then there's certainly hope...

post #89 of 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by music_4321 View Post

Well, if you appreciate (some of) the music of Mr Brian Eno, then there's certainly hope...

 

I appreciate it all :D From Blank Frank to In The Future.

post #90 of 92

I've gotten over the headphone/high-end e-peen contest and this hobby no longer interests me (other than music itself, I like to stick around to help others) do I fit in with this thread?

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