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The Most Outrageous Comment by an Audiophile You Ever Heard (or Read)... - Page 2  

post #16 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaddie View Post

You can guess what that was, what it did, and how you used it on your own.

 

Did it open up the soundstage, give the treble more sparkle, smooth out the low end, and make everything more natural, musical, and magical?

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jaddie View Post

And, I know of no other field of science that is so unevenly populated with intense mythology as audio.  Don't know why.

 

Oh, the science of audio is very sound (pardon the pun) and well understood.  The mythology comes from the fact that technology moves slower than marketing, and the fact that we figured out how to make damn good sound dozens of years and thousands of dollars sooner than audio companies would have liked.  Combine that with a general consumerist desire to upgrade!!! and you've got where we are now.

post #17 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by sethsez View Post

 

Did it open up the soundstage, give the treble more sparkle, smooth out the low end, and make everything more natural, musical, and magical?

All that and more.  Unless you put it on your preamp backwards and played country music...in which case you got your wife back, your car back, your farm back....

 

Probably should have put it backwards on your credit card and got your money back.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sethsez View Post

Oh, the science of audio is very sound (pardon the pun) and well understood.  The mythology comes from the fact that technology moves slower than marketing, and the fact that we figured out how to make damn good sound dozens of years and thousands of dollars sooner than audio companies would have liked.  Combine that with a general consumerist desire to upgrade!!! and you've got where we are now.

While I agree with that, it's not what differentiates audio from any other area of tech marketing.  Yet audio seems to get much more in the way of mythology than, say, automotive tech or photography.  

post #18 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaddie View Post

While I agree with that, it's not what differentiates audio from any other area of tech marketing.  Yet audio seems to get much more in the way of mythology than, say, automotive tech or photography.  

I feel like it's at least partially because those hobbies require much more active participation than audio does.  Driving a car or pulling focus require more effort and engagement than sitting down and spending money.

post #19 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by sethsez View Post

I feel like it's at least partially because those hobbies require much more active participation than audio does.  Driving a car or pulling focus require more effort and engagement than sitting down and spending money.

Hmm.. might be right at that.  Audio is fairly passive once the stuff is bought and set up.  But then, so is video, but the only product I see that depends on mythology in video is power conditioning, with one manufacturer claiming better picture from it, which is odd because it's so easily refuted.  There are no bricks, clocks or audio creams (another favorite!) for video.  And it too is pretty passive.  

post #20 of 24

Video's seeing much more genuine growth, though.  HD has only been around for home use in any meaningful sense for about a decade, and its widespread acceptance has been around for considerably less.  Meanwhile, TVs and projectors have been getting considerably cheaper, considerably larger, and measurably better year after year.  A thin 50 inch TV with deep black levels that won't blur or burn in is still quite new, and at an affordable price even newer still, while 15 years ago a 37 inch rear projection 480i TV for four times the cost was considered extremely nice.

 

With the big, blatant shifts video has had over the past couple decades, people with upgrade fever haven't had the time to get antsy and buy magic rocks.

post #21 of 24
Not "audiophiles" but I have a serious problem with walking into a store and hearing a salesman singing the praises of a "upgrade" HDMI (or other digital signal cable) I've had to step in and correct a couple of too pushy salesman. Of course I always turn it around with a "now if you want to spend that money on a real upgrade, have these guys do an in home calibration." So many people buy high end stuff, take it out of the box, plug it an and go, never realizing how much more performance can be squeezed out by a little fine tuning
post #22 of 24

Crazy audiophools don't like me very much. They tend to clam up around me and scowl a lot. I miss out on a lot of fun stuff that way, but I'm not very good at playing stupid and suffering fools gladly.

post #23 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by sethsez View Post

Did it open up the soundstage, give the treble more sparkle, smooth out the low end, and make everything more natural, musical, and magical?

Don't forget the "veil" being "lifted". Thats one of the favorite expressions used by audiophools. If your read threads on summit-fi about people's journeys, you'll read about these veils being lifted like at every upgrade, from "toxic cables" to power conditioners, from USB premium cables to amp upgrades.

https://www.google.com.br/search?q=veil+lifted+site:head-fi.org&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&hl=en&client=safari
post #24 of 24

Sorry, but this is supposed to be a forum about science, not about bashing people for fun.

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