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CD player - upgrade or trade? - Page 2

post #16 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Baxide View Post


I wonder what OS he used, which CD-ROM drive was in the machine, and which ripper he used.

I have been ripping discs since the first ripper for Windows 3.1 became available. My own experience with that process has shown that the process is not so clear cut and accurate. A disc with many errors might play quite happily in a CD player, but would not rip properly. Then there are rippers that are more accurate than others. A CD player has the Reed-Solomon error correction built in, but I have never found any reference to that error correction process in any ripper software. 

 

I would say that any disk drive will have error correction built in.

A CD player can happily skip frames if there are errors, it doesn't really matter. Thats why disc with errors can play in a CD player.

 

A PC can't afford to do that because it reads the CD as a storage medium, and ripping aims at making a perfect copy of the data.

I'm sure if you play your CD in a CD-ROM drive as a music cd (with some music software), a disc with errors would work as well.

post #17 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by brymuse View Post

So you could potentially remaster your cd collection at point of transfer to computer? I would certainly be interested to hear the difference in SQ the two. I listen mostly to classical and I can hear that recordings from the early days of CD aren't all perfect. I really dont come across many duds these days tho.
Maybe when the CD player gives up the ghost, I will get a dac as a step on the road to computersville... smily_headphones1.gif
Well I don't know that I would go as far as calling it "remastered" but it can take the harshness off some discs, and makes them a lot more listenable.
And it's not done at the point where you transfer the music to your computer - these are VST Plugins, which means they are applied during playback. If you change your mind later and decide you don't like the sound, or want to try something else, the original audio is untouched.

There are a number of declipping plugins out there, but that example was from iZotope RX2 - which is $350. It's far more than just a declipper and is a full suite intended for mastering/repair of audio tracks, rather than just declipping music.

I wonder if there was sufficient interest from Head-Fi, if they would consider selling the declipper plugin as a stand-alone product.

But when you consider the cost of say JRiver Media Center ($50) iZotope RX2 ($350) maybe Redline Monitor ($100) and an ODAC ($150) you're still looking at a lot less money than the better CD players/transports.

And there are free/cheaper plugins that achieve similar results - there are a number of free Crossfeed/HRTF plugins you could use instead of Redline Monitor that still produce great results, and Perfect Declipper is $130 rather than $350. I'm sure there are probably cheaper/free declippers out there too, but replacing those two plugins alone halves the cost of the whole setup.

And of course the price of DACs ranges from being a lot cheaper than the ODAC, to a lot more expensive, depending on what you want.
Edited by StudioSound - 5/2/13 at 4:07am
post #18 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by proton007 View Post

 

I would say that any disk drive will have error correction built in.

A CD player can happily skip frames if there are errors, it doesn't really matter. Thats why disc with errors can play in a CD player.

 

A PC can't afford to do that because it reads the CD as a storage medium, and ripping aims at making a perfect copy of the data.

I'm sure if you play your CD in a CD-ROM drive as a music cd (with some music software), a disc with errors would work as well.


Not true at all. A CD player can only skip a certain amount of errors before it starts to become noticeable and eventually causes the player to abandon any attempts to play any further. I have a bit of a background in designing these things in the 80's and 90's wink.gif.

 

When you play a CD in a PC drive you are more likely to have even less chance of playing an error prone CD. I got the complete set of Philips test discs, including the ones with the drilled test holes and fingerprint smudge test, and have used them over the years to test CD players versus PC CD-ROM drives.

post #19 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Baxide View Post


Not true at all. A CD player can only skip a certain amount of errors before it starts to become noticeable and eventually causes the player to abandon any attempts to play any further. I have a bit of a background in designing these things in the 80's and 90's wink.gif.

 

When you play a CD in a PC drive you are more likely to have even less chance of playing an error prone CD. I got the complete set of Philips test discs, including the ones with the drilled test holes and fingerprint smudge test, and have used them over the years to test CD players versus PC CD-ROM drives.

 

Yes, so a CD player can skip frames (till a limit) while a PC cannot.

post #20 of 22

I just read through this thread and, not that it's unusual around here, there are a lot of opinions being presented as fact. For those of you considering moving from CD to computer based music systems I suggest you take your best CD recording and ripe it to your computer in the format you plan to use, and then do an A/B comparison, CD to computer. It's your ears, not someone else's ears or opinion that count. If you do decide to move your music collection to computer, BACK IT UP! There are too many horror stories of stolen PCs or failed HDs that have caused the loss of hundreds or thousands of hours of music. Short of a house fire, that's not likely to happen to your CD collection.

post #21 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by fatcat28037 View Post

BACK IT UP!

 

This is very important. When looking for hard drives, remember you are going to need more than one.  For my music I have 2 drives in RAID 1, another HDD at home, and another at work. If all else fails I have the CDs. Chances of me losing my music are almost zero.  I couldn't imagine having to rip over a 1000 CDs again.

post #22 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Radioking59 View Post

This is very important. When looking for hard drives, remember you are going to need more than one.  For my music I have 2 drives in RAID 1, another HDD at home, and another at work. If all else fails I have the CDs. Chances of me losing my music are almost zero.  I couldn't imagine having to rip over a 1000 CDs again.
While your system seems solid, I just want to make it clear to people that RAID is not a backup. It protects against disk failure, it does not replace an independent backup of your files.
Edited by StudioSound - 5/2/13 at 2:28pm
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