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The Fiio X5 Thread - Page 124

post #1846 of 19481
Quote:
Originally Posted by JamesFiiO View Post
 

 

not problem for one hand. in fact, you don't need to press the other bottoms because it is very easy to control the volume and choose one sound tracks by the wheel and the play key. for example

 

turn the wheel when playing, you will go into a new screen like below so you can choose the other sound track.

 

 

 

if you press the play bottom more than 2 second, the volume control pop up so you can adjust the volume.

 

 

it is quite simple for use. of course, you can press the play key for play or pause 

It looks easy, but what about the bugs?

post #1847 of 19481

http://www.guru3d.com/news_story/green_house_256gb_gh_sdxcua256g_sdxc_uhs_i_memory_card.html

 

One SD slot would have made a better choice.


Edited by turokrocks - 11/20/13 at 3:02am
post #1848 of 19481
Quote:
Originally Posted by turokrocks View Post

http://www.guru3d.com/news_story/green_house_256gb_gh_sdxcua256g_sdxc_uhs_i_memory_card.html



One SD slot would have made a better choice.

I think it's time for us to stop asking more for this product! Now let's enjoy the beauty of the X5 and accept with it is now!

Just saying xD
post #1849 of 19481
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mimouille View Post


You can express any opinion you like. Just talk about the brands and avoid saying "The Chinese" or "These people". This has nothing to do with freedom of speech.

Well,
I stand corrected like a 5 year old and from now on all ill write here will be like everybody else:

WOW,AMaZing Product, Im buying It, Just give me More!biggrin.gif
post #1850 of 19481
Quote:
Originally Posted by soundblast75 View Post

Well,
I stand corrected like a 5 year old and from now on all ill write here will be like everybody else:

WOW,AMaZing Product, Im buying It, Just give me More!biggrin.gif
Did you read what I said above ? Apparently not. So I will just give up. Making it more explicit is not possible.
post #1851 of 19481
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mimouille View Post

Did you read what I said above ? Apparently not. So I will just give up. Making it more explicit is not possible.
Oo dont worry i want be any trouble in YOUR forum!
post #1852 of 19481

James, isn't it better if you could map the volume control to the wheel? the wheel is unclickable right?

post #1853 of 19481
Quote:
Originally Posted by soundblast75 View Post


Oo dont worry i want be any trouble in YOUR forum!

 

Please stop, Mimouille is just asking you to have more respect with people, working hard to bring us good sounding DAP at an afordable price.

If you have constructive criticism, you're welcome. 

 

Anyway the X5 is promising for me, I look forward to first impressions !

post #1854 of 19481

While we’re waiting for pictures of the official final production version of the X5 (which looks somewhat different from those leaked so far), let me tell you a story about its UI and body design.

 

When it comes to DAPs as consumer electronics, there’s nothing new under the sun anymore.  In the ten years or so since the iPod’s inception, countless different DAPs have been made and sold, but today, iPods continue to be recognized as the DAPs with the best UI.  A simple sorting of the current iPod product line puts them in two categories: 1. touch-sensitive scroll / click wheel, e.g. on the iPod Classic; 2. touchscreen operation, e.g. on the iPod Touch.
 

When the X5 project was started, we knew that one of our first tasks was to make a breakthrough in UI and body design.  After much research and debate, we first ruled out a touchscreen design for the following reasons:

·touchscreen development would lengthen the product development cycle beyond the target timeframe.

·limited supply of small touchscreens.

·several players on the market utilizing small 2.4” touchscreens have poor UI experience compared to even the iPod Classic owing to too-small screen.

 

If a touchscreen is not to be employed, a scroll wheel is the only user-friendly alternative.  This is the same reason why every smartphone out there today is a rectangular slab with a touchscreen: it’s the only thing that makes sense.  If we tried to innovate for the sake of innovating, we’d end up with something like a Siemens SX1: a curious study in failed UI experimentation. it is very innovative but it is not a good design.

 

In other words, making designs that work with users’ expectations and experience with existing products is more important than innovation for innovation’s sake.

 
Thus we first affirmed that the UI will be based around a scroll wheel.



With that out of the way, the next design choice is obvious: the scroll wheel will be mechanical.  Obvious, because the other possibility, a touch-sensitive scroll / click wheel as on the iPod, had been patented by Apple.

 

 

The next part was difficult.  The scroll / click wheel got patented for good reason: not only does it allow fast scrolling forwards and backwards by touch, it also contains four mechanical buttons at the top, bottom, left and right that can be pushed.  With only a mechanical scroll wheel, we’d be short four buttons and have no way to make a good UI.  So we needed to put some keys back on the X5 somehow.  Moreover, these keys need to be used in conjunction with the scroll wheel to realize certain functions, and the UI elements should be in a reasonably tight grouping to allow quick operation by the user.  Thus the buttons should not be too far away from the wheel.  Ideally they should be integrated with the wheel in an organic way.

 
Finally, with the iPod and the X5 sharing a scroll wheel as the central design element, we needed to inject our own unique design elements and innovations to the scroll wheel, otherwise the X5 would come off as a clumsy me-too product.  This was the most important and the most difficult point.

 

So, how does the X5 innovate on the basis of learning from well-established design and avoid being described as looking like “a dumbphone missing a few buttons” (as some have described the X3) or other derogatory descriptions?
 

The answer: the X5’s scroll wheel design draws inspiration from classic audio equipment.  Just like a music player app for smartphones may be represented by an old-style turntable or a jukebox, the X5’s scroll wheel design references a DJ controller.  The four keys are placed around the “turntable” to minimize finger travel while navigating the X5.  Moreover, the X-shaped layout references the name of our player.

 

If all goes well, the next generation of X3 (maybe after 10 months) , as well as the upcoming X1 and X5 players, will all incorporate the X keygroup + scroll wheel basic layout.  This helps us build our own house style of user interface and reduce relearning effort for customers.  Moreover, with the same physical UI layout employed, firmware development efforts towards improving user experience and user interface can carry across all three models and there shall be fewer bugs as well.  As for the coming flagship that will be placed above the X5, a large touchscreen + keys + knob design is planned.

 

Finally, we will take note of users’ feedback and criticism on our designs, old and new, and continue to improve our design aesthetics.  Exterior design involves personal and subjective judgement so not everyone will be pleased by the same product.  Nevertheless, if you’re not satisfied with our current products’ designs, we invite you to keep a close eye on our future product designs.

 

BTW, Joebloggs help me translated to English, thanks

post #1855 of 19481
Quote:
Originally Posted by Retrias View Post
 

James, isn't it better if you could map the volume control to the wheel? the wheel is unclickable right?

 

yes, you can use the wheel to adjust the volume. and the wheel is unclickable.

post #1856 of 19481
Quote:
Originally Posted by JamesFiiO View Post
 

While we’re waiting for pictures of the official final production version of the X5 (which looks somewhat different from those leaked so far), let me tell you a story about its UI and body design.

 

When it comes to DAPs as consumer electronics, there’s nothing new under the sun anymore.  In the ten years or so since the iPod’s inception, countless different DAPs have been made and sold, but today, iPods continue to be recognized as the DAPs with the best UI.  A simple sorting of the current iPod product line puts them in two categories: 1. touch-sensitive scroll / click wheel, e.g. on the iPod Classic; 2. touchscreen operation, e.g. on the iPod Touch.
 

When the X5 project was started, we knew that one of our first tasks was to make a breakthrough in UI and body design.  After much research and debate, we first ruled out a touchscreen design for the following reasons:

·touchscreen development would lengthen the product development cycle beyond the target timeframe.

·limited supply of small touchscreens.

·several players on the market utilizing small 2.4” touchscreens have poor UI experience compared to even the iPod Classic owing to too-small screen.

 

If a touchscreen is not to be employed, a scroll wheel is the only user-friendly alternative.  This is the same reason why every smartphone out there today is a rectangular slab with a touchscreen: it’s the only thing that makes sense.  If we tried to innovate for the sake of innovating, we’d end up with something like a Siemens SX1: a curious study in failed UI experimentation. it is very innovative but it is not a good design.

 

In other words, making designs that work with users’ expectations and experience with existing products is more important than innovation for innovation’s sake.

 
Thus we first affirmed that the UI will be based around a scroll wheel.



With that out of the way, the next design choice is obvious: the scroll wheel will be mechanical.  Obvious, because the other possibility, a touch-sensitive scroll / click wheel as on the iPod, had been patented by Apple.

 

 

The next part was difficult.  The scroll / click wheel got patented for good reason: not only does it allow fast scrolling forwards and backwards by touch, it also contains four mechanical buttons at the top, bottom, left and right that can be pushed.  With only a mechanical scroll wheel, we’d be short four buttons and have no way to make a good UI.  So we needed to put some keys back on the X5 somehow.  Moreover, these keys need to be used in conjunction with the scroll wheel to realize certain functions, and the UI elements should be in a reasonably tight grouping to allow quick operation by the user.  Thus the buttons should not be too far away from the wheel.  Ideally they should be integrated with the wheel in an organic way.

 
Finally, with the iPod and the X5 sharing a scroll wheel as the central design element, we needed to inject our own unique design elements and innovations to the scroll wheel, otherwise the X5 would come off as a clumsy me-too product.  This was the most important and the most difficult point.

 

So, how does the X5 innovate on the basis of learning from well-established design and avoid being described as looking like “a dumbphone missing a few buttons” (as some have described the X3) or other derogatory descriptions?
 

The answer: the X5’s scroll wheel design draws inspiration from classic audio equipment.  Just like a music player app for smartphones may be represented by an old-style turntable or a jukebox, the X5’s scroll wheel design references a DJ controller.  The four keys are placed around the “turntable” to minimize finger travel while navigating the X5.  Moreover, the X-shaped layout references the name of our player.

 

If all goes well, the next generation of X3 (maybe after 10 months) , as well as the upcoming X1 and X5 players, will all incorporate the X keygroup + scroll wheel basic layout.  This helps us build our own house style of user interface and reduce relearning effort for customers.  Moreover, with the same physical UI layout employed, firmware development efforts towards improving user experience and user interface can carry across all three models and there shall be fewer bugs as well.  As for the coming flagship that will be placed above the X5, a large touchscreen + keys + knob design is planned.

 

Finally, we will take note of users’ feedback and criticism on our designs, old and new, and continue to improve our design aesthetics.  Exterior design involves personal and subjective judgement so not everyone will be pleased by the same product.  Nevertheless, if you’re not satisfied with our current products’ designs, we invite you to keep a close eye on our future product designs.

 

BTW, Joebloggs help me translated to English, thanks

Well done Fiio and joebloggs. Joe, hopefully Fiio will utilize your talents to transcribe their user manuals as well for any future products, if you have the time and the price is right of course. I don't think any overseas company who decides to enter the North American market should underestimate the impression  well written and properly dicted product literature will have on their English speaking customers. This level of detail attention will have a subtle but significant subconscious influence on your customers overall impressions of your company and it's products.

post #1857 of 19481
Quote:
Originally Posted by JamesFiiO View Post
 
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Quote:
 

While we’re waiting for pictures of the official final production version of the X5 (which looks somewhat different from those leaked so far), let me tell you a story about its UI and body design.

 

When it comes to DAPs as consumer electronics, there’s nothing new under the sun anymore.  In the ten years or so since the iPod’s inception, countless different DAPs have been made and sold, but today, iPods continue to be recognized as the DAPs with the best UI.  A simple sorting of the current iPod product line puts them in two categories: 1. touch-sensitive scroll / click wheel, e.g. on the iPod Classic; 2. touchscreen operation, e.g. on the iPod Touch.
 

When the X5 project was started, we knew that one of our first tasks was to make a breakthrough in UI and body design.  After much research and debate, we first ruled out a touchscreen design for the following reasons:

·touchscreen development would lengthen the product development cycle beyond the target timeframe.

·limited supply of small touchscreens.

·several players on the market utilizing small 2.4” touchscreens have poor UI experience compared to even the iPod Classic owing to too-small screen.

 

If a touchscreen is not to be employed, a scroll wheel is the only user-friendly alternative.  This is the same reason why every smartphone out there today is a rectangular slab with a touchscreen: it’s the only thing that makes sense.  If we tried to innovate for the sake of innovating, we’d end up with something like a Siemens SX1: a curious study in failed UI experimentation. it is very innovative but it is not a good design.

 

In other words, making designs that work with users’ expectations and experience with existing products is more important than innovation for innovation’s sake.

 
Thus we first affirmed that the UI will be based around a scroll wheel.



With that out of the way, the next design choice is obvious: the scroll wheel will be mechanical.  Obvious, because the other possibility, a touch-sensitive scroll / click wheel as on the iPod, had been patented by Apple.

 

 

The next part was difficult.  The scroll / click wheel got patented for good reason: not only does it allow fast scrolling forwards and backwards by touch, it also contains four mechanical buttons at the top, bottom, left and right that can be pushed.  With only a mechanical scroll wheel, we’d be short four buttons and have no way to make a good UI.  So we needed to put some keys back on the X5 somehow.  Moreover, these keys need to be used in conjunction with the scroll wheel to realize certain functions, and the UI elements should be in a reasonably tight grouping to allow quick operation by the user.  Thus the buttons should not be too far away from the wheel.  Ideally they should be integrated with the wheel in an organic way.

 
Finally, with the iPod and the X5 sharing a scroll wheel as the central design element, we needed to inject our own unique design elements and innovations to the scroll wheel, otherwise the X5 would come off as a clumsy me-too product.  This was the most important and the most difficult point.

 

So, how does the X5 innovate on the basis of learning from well-established design and avoid being described as looking like “a dumbphone missing a few buttons” (as some have described the X3) or other derogatory descriptions?
 

The answer: the X5’s scroll wheel design draws inspiration from classic audio equipment.  Just like a music player app for smartphones may be represented by an old-style turntable or a jukebox, the X5’s scroll wheel design references a DJ controller.  The four keys are placed around the “turntable” to minimize finger travel while navigating the X5.  Moreover, the X-shaped layout references the name of our player.

 

If all goes well, the next generation of X3 (maybe after 10 months) , as well as the upcoming X1 and X5 players, will all incorporate the X keygroup + scroll wheel basic layout.  This helps us build our own house style of user interface and reduce relearning effort for customers.  Moreover, with the same physical UI layout employed, firmware development efforts towards improving user experience and user interface can carry across all three models and there shall be fewer bugs as well.  As for the coming flagship that will be placed above the X5, a large touchscreen + keys + knob design is planned.

 

Finally, we will take note of users’ feedback and criticism on our designs, old and new, and continue to improve our design aesthetics.  Exterior design involves personal and subjective judgement so not everyone will be pleased by the same product.  Nevertheless, if you’re not satisfied with our current products’ designs, we invite you to keep a close eye on our future product designs.

 

BTW, Joebloggs help me translated to English, thanks

 

 

 

 

Very interesting.

Wish you all the best.

Keep the good products coming.

 

James , will there be some future project with the "ES9018MK2"? (the portable version of ES9018)


Edited by turokrocks - 11/20/13 at 5:03am
post #1858 of 19481

Great post James, keep the good work and the great relationship with the users.

post #1859 of 19481
Quote:
Originally Posted by turokrocks View Post
 

 

Very interesting.

Wish you all the best.

Keep the good products coming.

 

James , will there be some future project with the "ES9018MK2"? (the portable version of ES9018)

 

yes, maybe in our X7 after 1 year

post #1860 of 19481
Quote:
Originally Posted by good sound View Post
 

Well done Fiio and joebloggs. Joe, hopefully Fiio will utilize your talents to transcribe their user manuals as well for any future products, if you have the time and the price is right of course. I don't think any overseas company who decides to enter the North American market should underestimate the impression  well written and properly dicted product literature will have on their English speaking customers. This level of detail attention will have a subtle but significant subconscious influence on your customers overall impressions of your company and it's products.

 

yes, that is why Joe Joined us and became member of FiiO.

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