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JVC HA-SZ2000/1000 Impressions Thread - Page 54

post #796 of 1370
Quote:
Originally Posted by flowza View Post
 

 

Do you think the Schiit Vali/Modi or the Fiio e17 can provide enough juice for them? Also how well do these work with EDM? I mostly listen to EDM and stuff like that. (stuff like this:https://soundcloud.com/spinninrecords/kshmr-megalodon-original-mix)

 

I would think anything that can amp/elevate the stage down to around the 30Hz region should be fine

 

My knowledge base on these are regarding bass depth and impact.

Made my hunt easier..relative to others on a hunt for something they wont know until they hear it.

I do **** like this in my extra time:frown: instead of finding a good eq for these to play back Marvin Gaye.

post #797 of 1370
Ipod CLASSIC > Fiio E12 with bass boost on set to low gain will blow you away already. Volume at 1 pm. If that is not enough for you you can switch to high gain....... And my CLASSIC has the EU volume cap. Btw for me the pads are just fine right now. Might try the Beyer T5p pads later.
post #798 of 1370
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kukyo View Post
 


No, i haven't tried them yet, but i asked around and they should fit, but they could be a little loose. I've been experimenting with my HD25's with Amperior Cups, seeing they hit almost as low as the SZ2K, but they're a lot more portable. They do depend on the track actually, but i think i finally found my best portable setup (since the SZ2K are really heavy and bulky for street usage, at least for me). I might jump the gun and just buy a pair of Alpha Pads, but that should be at the end of the month, at least until i finish experimenting with my HD25's.

 

cool, thanks for the reply!

post #799 of 1370

I was wondering why the "bass" thread was so quiet!!

 

So how are the new owners liking the JVCs?!?

post #800 of 1370

OK, I finally ordered the SZ2000, HM5 pads, and EDT770S pads. Looking forward to playing with the different pads, and will also try to compare it to the Alpha Pads that are currently on my Mad Dogs. Looking forward to it! I needed a true bass headphones in my collection, this should be fun.

post #801 of 1370


I decided to drop green on these cans after high praise reports mainly by the bass beast that is Hawaiibadboy on the former BassHeads Club thread, which for reasons unknown to me was recently closed but continues in new Audiophile Bass Lounge thread, though I think Hawaiibadboy is now banned, also reasons unknown to me, but is a shame, as this first impressions review of mine is with that HBB in mind.

So, these cans come in a rather unassuming box, which is severely lacking in advertising that these cans are bass orientated. If a prospective bass head buyer for new cans was in a store, he/she could easily walk past these cans completely unaware of their bass capabilities.

Inner box has cans nicely presented in dark blue silky fabric, suggesting the cans have pedigree and purpose that other cans may not befit such splendour.

Picking the SZ2000's up for the first time, you realise just how heavy they are, apparently a heavyweight 485g, considerably heavier than SONY MDR-XB1000, a cruiserweight at 375g.

Pads look plush and well padded, but are deceiving when worn as drivers are closer than you'd think and I found top of my left ear uncomfortably rests on the driver, so it takes me a bit of adjusting to find a sweet spot of comfort. I've not big or protruding ears and this is the first headcan I've experienced this kind of initial fit with, and I must have a small head, as I rarely have to extend headbands on cans, these being no exception.

Build quality is very good and the whole thing is put together very nicely and feels robust.


Main track I used to get a first feel of these cans, is a Hawaiibadboy recommendation, namely Wiz Khalifa's on my level track, noted for its serious bass.

First play was cans plugged directly into iPad, with EQ set to flat (same as EQ off), and these cans played no problem whatsoever, so are easily driven. Sound was nice and crisp, with tight punchy bass - very pleasant indeedy.

Second play had cans hooked up to Fiio E17, only with bass EQ set to max out level 10, again using iPad as source. Now this set up is to feel just how hard the bass slam is going to hit, and how the cans perform under such EQ extremities.

Boom! - the moment the track starts and the deep bass drops, these cans come to life as a fully fledged bass canon, it's pretty cool, the cans literally vibrate on your head. The bass, though pummelling your head in waves of profound bass, manages to keep it together and not bloat out - it's just no problem to the SZ2000's, these cans were expecting this and were well prepared for this EQ.

Comparing to the SONY XB1000's, the SZ2000's have more prominent mids and highs even when heavily bass EQ'd, the mids particularly retain their presence and clarity, where the XB1000's mids and highs seem a little recessed in comparison with bass leading and everything else following behind.

DSC_1010.jpg

The XB1000 does have a harder bass slam than the JVC's, but I'd guess that's down to their 70mm Goliath sized drivers.

All in all, the JVC SZ2000's are serious bass canons that deliver a mighty slam that will put a smile on any bassheads face for sure.

Gripes include the earpads, the cable is fixed undetachable and only 1.2 metres long and the provided carry bag is the cheapest quality one I've ever seen and seems like a last minute afterthought, but is not befitting of these cans at all - JVC could have done a lot better carry bag for sure.

So, big thanks to Hawaiibadboy for making these mighty cans known to me, as they are a lot of fun with a quality sound signature for the win.

My SZ2000's were first cans to sit proudly on my just received klutz design stand you see in photos, which has absolutely zero relevance to this first impression review, but headphone stand is in vibrant red, which I like enough to point out...tongue.gif


DSC_1004.jpg





Edited by cb3723 - 4/26/14 at 12:18am
post #802 of 1370

Thanks @cb3723 for the review of the JVC HA-SZ2000.  I have these on my list of future headphones to try/buy.  

post #803 of 1370
Quote:
Originally Posted by thx1000 View Post

Thanks @cb3723
 for the review of the JVC HA-SZ2000.  I have these on my list of future headphones to try/buy.  

If your music library isn't at least 80% low bass hip hop like lil Wayne don't bother
post #804 of 1370
Quote: (Click to show)
Quote:
Originally Posted by cb3723 View Post
 


I decided to drop green on these cans after high praise reports mainly by the bass beast that is Hawaiibadboy on the former BassHeads Club thread, which for reasons unknown to me was recently closed but continues in new Audiophile Bass Lounge thread, though I think Hawaiibadboy is now banned, also reasons unknown to me, but is a shame, as this first impressions review of mine is with that HBB in mind.

So, these cans come in a rather unassuming box, which is severely lacking in advertising that these cans are bass orientated. If a prospective bass head buyer for new cans was in a store, he/she could easily walk past these cans completely unaware of their bass capabilities.

Inner box has cans nicely presented in dark blue silky fabric, suggesting the cans have pedigree and purpose that other cans may not befit such splendour.

Picking the SZ2000's up for the first time, you realise just how heavy they are, apparently a heavyweight 485g, considerably heavier than SONY MDR-XB1000, a cruiserweight at 375g.

Pads look plush and well padded, but are deceiving when worn as drivers are closer than you'd think and I found top of my left ear uncomfortably rests on the driver, so it takes me a bit of adjusting to find a sweet spot of comfort. I've not big or protruding ears and this is the first headcan I've experienced this kind of initial fit with, and I must have a small head, as I rarely have to extend headbands on cans, these being no exception.

Build quality is very good and the whole thing is put together very nicely and feels robust.
 

Main track I used to get a first feel of these cans, is a Hawaiibadboy recommendation, namely Wiz Khalifa's on my level track, noted for its serious bass.

First play was cans plugged directly into iPad, with EQ set to flat (same as EQ off), and these cans played no problem whatsoever, so are easily driven. Sound was nice and crisp, with tight punchy bass - very pleasant indeedy.

Second play had cans hooked up to Fiio E17, only with bass EQ set to max out level 10, again using iPad as source. Now this set up is to feel just how hard the bass slam is going to hit, and how the cans perform under such EQ extremities.

Boom! - the moment the track starts and the deep bass drops, these cans come to life as a fully fledged bass canon, it's pretty cool, the cans literally vibrate on your head. The bass, though pummelling your head in waves of profound bass, manages to keep it together and not bloat out - it's just no problem to the SZ2000's, these cans were expecting this and were well prepared for this EQ.

Comparing to the SONY XB1000's, the SZ2000's have more prominent mids and highs even when heavily bass EQ'd, the mids particularly retain their presence and clarity, where the XB1000's mids and highs seem a little recessed in comparison with bass leading and everything else following behind.
 
DSC_1010.jpg

The XB1000 does have a harder bass slam than the JVC's, but I'd guess that's down to their 70mm Goliath sized drivers.

All in all, the JVC SZ2000's are serious bass canons that deliver a mighty slam that will put a smile on any bassheads face for sure.

Gripes include the earpads, the cable is fixed undetachable and only 1.2 metres long and the provided carry bag is the cheapest quality one I've ever seen and seems like a last minute afterthought, but is not befitting of these cans at all - JVC could have done a lot better carry bag for sure.

So, big thanks to Hawaiibadboy for making these mighty cans known to me, as they are a lot of fun with a quality sound signature for the win.

My SZ2000's were first cans to sit proudly on my just received klutz design stand you see in photos, which has absolutely zero relevance to this first impression review, but headphone stand is in vibrant red, which I like enough to point out...tongue.gif
 

DSC_1004.jpg



 

 

 

I only learned that there exist full size basshead cans a year after the original XB line was discontinued. The XB500 price tripled from $50 to $150, and both the XB700 and XB1000 were insanely priced likewise. It's not so much about the price but the risk of getting a counterfeit item. In Amazon.co.jp, the XB1000 can be had new for $450 from the marketplace and fulfilled by Amazon, +$50-60 Tenso shipping. That's worth 2 authentic SZ2000's, or a JVC HP-DX700, and almost there with the Fostex TH600.

 

Awesome and extremely important comparison, @cb3723. Having a comparative reference to the legendary XB1000 makes for solid historical continuity. Your headphone inventory is a treasure chest!

 

I wish you could try a "bass stress test" that @Hawaiibadboy and I use on our headphones, where we try to see the maximum volume limit the cans reach before distortion. To me, that is the most important thing to consider for extreme basshead cans, since once you know the cans can hit super loud, it means that they may be EQ'd to match the perceived impact of another pair. There is also the "room gain" factor from proper earpads, which significantly adds (mostly) low frequency gain. However, not very many listen to music louder than most headphones can handle.

 

I was supposed to start an Extreme Basshead Club thread, but I was recently shut down by the head-fi founder himself for making accusations that Hawaii's banning had something to do with the "other" guy being a member of the trade. That little discussion gave me a more positive, human view of head-fi (although, as with most industries built around subjectivity, the ambiguous "audiophile" language is still very lucrative and pretty much self-sustaining--through social validation/inertia--regardless of whether the language is used sincerely or maliciously; head-fi does have a dedicated sound science forum which dissects this language). Hawaii was simply being a bad boy, and I was surprised that his ban was not permanent, so that's a good thing. Right now I'm keeping a low profile until Hawaii starts a new club himself in a few days. Actually I'm already content with the SZ2000, and I'm just concentrating on portable equipment with good EQ that can give me my "maximum bass extreme" setup with a +30dB boost peaked at 25Hz:

 

IAsx1bQ.png

 

 

5GpptOi.png 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by spurxiii View Post


If your music library isn't at least 80% low bass hip hop like lil Wayne don't bother

 

I mostly listen to metal music, and I'm a fan of dynamic double pedal drumming. I need an EQ to simulate the depth and impact of the hip hop beat so metal music feels like a stampede of hooves to your face at 300 beats per minute.

 

Use EQ.


Edited by PocketSmiley - 4/26/14 at 3:22am
post #805 of 1370
Quote:
Originally Posted by PocketSmiley View Post

 

 

I mostly listen to metal music, and I'm a fan of dynamic double pedal drumming. I need an EQ to simulate the depth and impact of the hip hop beat so metal music feels like a stampede of hooves to your face at 300 beats per minute.

 

Use EQ.

 

That's interesting - I'm also mostly into metal and I love powerfull kick drums. So you think the JVC aren't that much lacking for this genre in other areas?

post #806 of 1370

I thought metal needs more than just the drums. The SZ2000 does lack somewhat in the other frequencies.

post #807 of 1370
Quote:
Originally Posted by PsiCore View Post
 

 

That's interesting - I'm also mostly into metal and I love powerfull kick drums. So you think the JVC aren't that much lacking for this genre in other areas?

 

To me, they are extremely versatile as long as you know how to EQ. Let me illustrate how I use my maximum extreme bass boost in metal/prog. rock/denpa:

 

First, I need to have those lower frequencies pounding as if produced by a hip-hop studio. Once I can feel them throbbing--with individual bass guitar notes intact and not muddied into each other--I start to raise the mid-to-high frequencies incrementally. Once I can hear the mid-to-high frequencies just fine, then I have my perfect sound. Denpa features high, delicate voices that aren't meant to be drowned. Prog. rock has layers of keyboard/piano tracks as well. Both metal and rock have flying guitar solos that should sound fine to cheap headphones when using distortion pedals. The quality of acoustic tracks such as Death - Voice of the Soul doesn't sound diminished as I perceive it, compared to that of the Grado SR60 or the much-hyped Sony MH1C in-ears. To some people, boosting the low frequencies inevitably muddies the mids (Hawaii thinks so), but to me, once your ears "get used" to this signature--your brain dividing the mixed signals into discrete parts--you can clearly hear what you're "looking for" much like separating a loved one's voice from the chatter of the crowds.

 

Right now I am directly recording my PC sound output (+30dB 25Hz boost maximum bass extreme setup) so that other SZ2000 owners can experience what I hear, with their settings on flat. My problem is that I can't replicate the exact effect of the added bass boost from my Fiio E12, which should be +5-6dB at 50Hz, without using an analog line-in, which would diminish sound quality compared to a direct sound card loopback.

post #808 of 1370
Quote:
 

 

How do you compare these to the Ultrasone Signature DJ and Siggnature Pro that you also own?

post #809 of 1370
Quote:
Originally Posted by spurxiii View Post


If your music library isn't at least 80% low bass hip hop like lil Wayne don't bother

So if hip hop is less than 80% of my music library, I shouldn't even bother with these headphones?  Thanks for the advice because I have too much variety in my music which includes Alternative, Blues, Classical, Country, EDM, Electronic, Hip-Hop/Rap, Industrial, Instrumental, Jazz, New Age, Pop, R&B/Soul, Reggae, Rock, Singer/Songwriter, Vocal, World (Hawaiian).  Yes, Hawaiian music because I was born and raised in Hawaii.

 

I just thought maybe I could listen to my 184 (and growing) hip hop/rap songs with a JVC HA-SZ2000.  In fact, there's probably more in my collection that would sound pretty good with the JVC HA-SZ2000.

 

I found some reviews online here and here that make the JVC HA-SZ2000 appear to be more genre friendly than you are.

post #810 of 1370

Do they sound similar to Philips L1, which are pretty dark?

How do they compare to DT770 80 Ohm, especially in the bass department?

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