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Why do no audiophiles listen to electronic music? - Page 9

post #121 of 238

@ OP 

 

 

 

I would say ,because they tend to be older ,and they tend to listen to classical etc.

 

Also ,because house music isn't in FLAC.

post #122 of 238
Thread Starter 
On HDTracks if you go on the Dance genre it comes back with nothing. Literally, nothing.
post #123 of 238
Quote:
Originally Posted by razor5cl View Post

On HDTracks if you go on the Dance genre it comes back with nothing. Literally, nothing.
Why not use Beatport, Juno Download or Bandcamp instead? Or, you know, CDs and vinyl?
post #124 of 238
Thread Starter 
I'm not complaining, I'm a big advocate of CD, and I use Beatport and Google Play to buy 320kbps MP3. I'm just saying that HDTracks doesn't even have anything of that genre.
post #125 of 238

Beatport is absurdly expensive for lossless files... I wished there was a cheaper alternative. Until then, sigh.

post #126 of 238
Thread Starter 
Beatport is just expensive full stop. For lossless files the process go up into the stratosphere, but I can just about stomach the standard prices, and for electronic music(the stuff I listen to anyway) I can't hear a difference between 320 and FLAC.
post #127 of 238
Quote:
Originally Posted by razor5cl View Post

Beatport is just expensive full stop. For lossless files the process go up into the stratosphere, but I can just about stomach the standard prices, and for electronic music(the stuff I listen to anyway) I can't hear a difference between 320 and FLAC.

I've purchased over 120 hours' worth of music (can't check the exact number right now) from Beatport since I discovered the site thanks to Head-Fi about 18 months ago – all in lossless. It sure is expensive and I must've spent over two grand on the site despite nearly always using discount coupons, but when your average track is in the 7 to 8 minute range with some being even longer than that, it's still often cheaper dollar per minute than buying a full-price CD, let alone an audiophile release. And don't even get me started on vinyl, especially if I have to pay for shipping from the States to Europe. I hope they'll lower their premium for lossless again in the future (hopefully drop it altogether someday), but I've discovered a lot of incredible music on the site so they've given me a lot more than they've taken from me. Music makes me happier than money ever could anyway. I also think that when prices are high, you have to put more care into what you really want to purchase and that can be a positive thing in itself. Not trying to defend BP's pricing policy, just pointing out you can always view things from many different angles. Paying the lossless premium for a 3-minute track is really awful though.

 

For the record, I always go for the physical release whenever one exists, be it CD or LP. Up until about two years ago I was strongly against paying for digital downloads, but since so much great music today doesn't get a physical release at all (which is very sad), I was forced to give in and embrace the world of digital downloads. I still feel no one should be asked to pay for lossy files in this day and age, but since certain releases are only available on the iTunes Store I do have to shop there every now and then. Hopefully they will eventually make lossless files available as countless audiophiles have been wishing for years now, yours truly included.

post #128 of 238
Thread Starter 

I generally go for the CD versions of larger, artist albums and digital for singles etc. Also I heard Beatport is really expensive if you're an artist, I think they take a large cut of your profits.I agree. 50 pence more isn't too bad for the hours of enjoyment you can get.

post #129 of 238
Quote:
Originally Posted by razor5cl View Post
 

I generally go for the CD versions of larger, artist albums and digital for singles etc. Also I heard Beatport is really expensive if you're an artist, I think they take a large cut of your profits.I agree. 50 pence more isn't too bad for the hours of enjoyment you can get.

I've never heard how much Beatport takes off the top. I believe iTunes takes a 30% cut, hence why I always prefer Bandcamp whenever possible because they only take 15% themselves, 10% if your annual sales exceed $5,000. Plus the artist gets the money immediately to their PayPal, not at the end of the month or whatever.

post #130 of 238

When someone mentions electronic music I'm usually thinking of Kraftwerk, Human League, OMD, Depeche Mode, Art of Noise, etc etc.  It was listening to a Depeche Mode 12" (Get the Balance Right, if you care) on a friend's Roksan Xerxes turntable that got me started in this hobby.  I've added a lot to my bag of test tracks since then, but that DM 12" is still there...  Here's another of my old-school electronic favourites.  The sound quality on this one is bad even by YouTube standards, but you get the idea.  I've still got half a dozen vinyl copies of this stashed away - just in case!  I've listened to it on vinyl, cassette, CD, DAT, MiniDisc, DCC, various bitrates of mp3, and now FLAC.  It never gets old...  If you don't want to sit through the whole thing, fast-forward to 18:10 and turn it up. 

 

 


Edited by Depechetraff - 2/22/14 at 8:52am
post #131 of 238

Interesting thread.  I am a long-time audiophile and also a long-time fanatic follower of electronic music.  My electronic music journey began in the early 80's with bands like Kraftwerk and Devo (yeah, I'm 48, so an old dude now) and has continued through to today.  I have closely followed the scene since the 80's.  I do appreciate much of the music from the so-called "golden era" of the 90's, however, I think today's electronic music, overall, is much better than the 90's stuff.  With some exceptions, of course.......;) (Boards of Canada, Casino Versus Japan, etc.)

 

What I listen to these days are, for the most part, the artists sold on boomkat and bleep.

 

Anyway, back to the OP's original post, I have tried my best to introduce electronic artists to other audiophiles on other audio website forums, but with limited success.  Oh well.  

 

Finally, I completely disagree with any generalized assertion that electronic music recordings are generally inferior to recordings from classical, rock, jazz or other genres.   All these genres have equal percentages of good and bad recordings.  The vast majority of the electronic artists that I listen to have good to outstanding album sonics, that sound even better on very revealing systems.  Pull up Mohn: Mohn, Desolate's Celestial Light Beings, Autechre: Quaristice, AtomTM's HD, or the 2013 remaster of the soundtrack to Blade Runner, just to name a few.

 

Cheers


Edited by BlakeT - 2/22/14 at 10:33am
post #132 of 238

I would say that the younger generation of audiophiles enjoy electronic (aka EDM) music.

post #133 of 238

*younger generation of audiophiles enjoy EDM. No aka EDM as electronics music is not just EDM.... :P 

 

There's tons of good electronic music which sounds excellent. 

To name a few:
Moderat

Burial (more dubstepish) 

Joy Orbison 

Floating Points

Apparat

Jon Hopkins

post #134 of 238

I do. :)

post #135 of 238

Like Kraftwerk you mean? :D

 

Lots of old people must like them, including younger fans. 

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