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Why do no audiophiles listen to electronic music? - Page 8

post #106 of 238
Thread Starter 

It's just a matter of opinion, I loved their earlier French House, sidechained sound but their new funk stuff is not for me, and I feel they are going a bit mainstream, so to speak.

post #107 of 238
That ghost deep list is great.
Surprised by how much of that list I know.
Goldie's "Timeless" might not be timeless, but I defy you not to get transported by to '97 when you give it a listen.
post #108 of 238

Because the kind of people that listen to those genres of music probably buy Beats.

 

Bazing!

post #109 of 238
rolleyes.gif
post #110 of 238
Quote:
Originally Posted by PraetorXyn View Post
 

Because the kind of people that listen to those genres of music probably buy Beats.

 

Bazing!


yea! just like people who write posts like that usually have constructive things to say...

post #111 of 238
There's an astonishing lack of familiarity with electronic music in this thread.

I like everything from Charles Dodge to Paul Oakenfold and Paul VanDyk (who's put out some excellent podcasts on iTunes, btw), along with VnV, KMFDM, gosh there are about a thousand others. Daft Punk of course, very clever and knowledgeable not only of the history of EDM but of the science of sound, to the point where some of their compositions are actually commentaries on the interactions of different kinds of sonic events. Mouse on Mars is astonishing, along of course with Autechre, and Aphex Twin, if you're into more experimental efforts (MoM mixes incredible polyrhythmic things with incredible sonic range).

Very little of the best EDM broke through during it's renaissance 1993-2001 period, and a lot done now, with the exclusion of dub-step, happy-core etc. is pretty derivative.

Morcheeba. Sneaker Pimps. Chumbawamba. Juno Reactor. Leftfield:Rhythm and Stealth. Add N to (X), Avant Hard. Sasha and Digweed.

You kids should get out more! smily_headphones1.gif

My point also is that this is not by any means all compressed, bass-heavy, poorly recorded crap. On the contrary, electronic instruments push the frequency and dynamic range limits of even the best systems out there. It is not easy any easier to record the subtleties of a Moog Voyager or for that matter Absynth than it is to record a French Horn or Tuba. The knowledge needed to do electronic music well is pretty extensive. A lot of it has now been pre-packaged for the current generation of performers, but that's their limitation if they remain superficial, not the genre's. The capabilities built into Ableton Live 9, Native Instruments' Komplete 9 and Maschine 2.0 are phenomenal, however; beware, I anticipate a breakout of spectacular new innovation any day now. Go to www.ableton.com and www.native-instruments.com to get just a taste of some of the innovation taking place outside the glaring spotlight of the main commercial corpo-music industry.

I'll regale you with my rant over the general stupidity inherent in most people's understanding of rap and hip-hop another time.

Meanwhile, all I can say is: http://youtu.be/QlWZluzBNxM

!!! enjoy and show some RESPECT! smily_headphones1.gif


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
Edited by Copperears - 11/9/13 at 4:34pm
post #112 of 238
click for some music (Click to show)

Some more of my favorite albums.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

post #113 of 238
Quote:
Originally Posted by Copperears View Post

There's an astonishing lack of familiarity with electronic music in this thread.

I like everything from Charles Dodge to Paul Oakenfold and Paul VanDyk (who's put out some excellent podcasts on iTunes, btw), along with VnV, KMFDM, gosh there are about a thousand others. Daft Punk of course, very clever and knowledgeable not only of the history of EDM but of the science of sound, to the point where some of their compositions are actually commentaries on the interactions of different kinds of sonic events. Mouse on Mars is astonishing, along of course with Autechre, and Aphex Twin, if you're into more experimental efforts (MoM mixes incredible polyrhythmic things with incredible sonic range).

Very little of the best EDM broke through during it's renaissance 1993-2001 period, and a lot done now, with the exclusion of dub-step, happy-core etc. is pretty derivative.

Morcheeba. Sneaker Pimps. Chumbawamba. Juno Reactor. Leftfield:Rhythm and Stealth. Add N to (X), Avant Hard. Sasha and Digweed.

You kids should get out more! smily_headphones1.gif

My point also is that this is not by any means all compressed, bass-heavy, poorly recorded crap. On the contrary, electronic instruments push the frequency and dynamic range limits of even the best systems out there. It is not easy any easier to record the subtleties of a Moog Voyager or for that matter Absynth than it is to record a French Horn or Tuba. The knowledge needed to do electronic music well is pretty extensive. A lot of it has now been pre-packaged for the current generation of performers, but that's their limitation if they remain superficial, not the genre's. The capabilities built into Ableton Live 9, Native Instruments' Komplete 9 and Maschine 2.0 are phenomenal, however; beware, I anticipate a breakout of spectacular new innovation any day now. Go to www.ableton.com and www.native-instruments.com to get just a taste of some of the innovation taking place outside the glaring spotlight of the main commercial corpo-music industry.

I'll regale you with my rant over the general stupidity inherent in most people's understanding of rap and hip-hop another time.

Meanwhile, all I can say is: http://youtu.be/QlWZluzBNxM

!!! enjoy and show some RESPECT! smily_headphones1.gif


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

 

Hear! Hear!

 

Excellent post-

 

Cheers!

post #114 of 238
Stop using the word electronica.

It burns my ears, and I need those for perceptive listening.

Smh

Sent from my SGH-T999 using Tapatalk
post #115 of 238
"electronica" was a term invented by the American corporate music biz to try to categorize and sell the complexity of disco/techno/goa/trance etc. to American frat boys in the Midwest.

Unfortunately, it worked. I just like to think of it as dancetech..... wink.gif



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post #116 of 238
A lot of people on this thread who criticize electronic music come from an "accurate sound of music" and music should be "complex" approach to enjoy their music. This sort of conflict arises in other forms of Art as well such as Realism and Surrealism painting or Gothic and Minimalism Architecture. The problem with that concrete way of thinking is that it limits the artists musical freedom. The people composing the sounds in electronic music are not necessarily aiming for accurate sound, realistic instrumentation, or complexity. Take a quick listen at the compositions of Brian Eno ( http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7-Vq4pmzMaE ) and tell me his music is sonically inaccurate. Ofcourse it is, because he intended it to sound unreal, there is a great video on youtube explaining how he created his music too, using a random equilizer generator ( http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3MPDbScEN0Y ) Complex music is not the only type of music that can be enjoyable. In terms a classical braggart could understand, Richard Wagner ( http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3cU35LFVAUw ) and Erik Satie ( http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S-Xm7s9eGxU ) aim for different sounds. One artist creates complex music, found in opera and large performances with a wide range of instruments, while the other artist's music can be found played on a solo piano playing a simple piece, on a single instrument. Is one better than the other by sheer number of performers or sounds? No, they're different styles. Please do not criticize something you have no knowledge or appreciation for. In my honest opinion, it is more important for me to love and enjoy my music than it is to sonically appreciate it's accuracy. Electronic music tends to give me more flexibility in how to go about listening to it since the sounds are not based on real world items (sometimes they are and that is a different story)

I'm surprised I haven't seen people talk about artists like Glitch Mob with Animus Vox:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=17PM-UMVud8

Hans Zimmer's Inception Time
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5WOcU7J9F3E

Or Phil Collins In the Air Tonight
Edited by ASillyUsername - 12/14/13 at 8:52pm
post #117 of 238
Thread Starter 
I totally agree with the flexibility thing. Because there's no set way it sounds, you can use any headphone of your choice, whereas with some acoustic music there are some phones that work and some that don't.
post #118 of 238

Wow - I`m pretty psyched to find this thread.  I`m an HD800 owner (and just recently the excellent Shure SE846) and a long time fan of this musical genre.  I love that top-100 list, it reminded me of an old fave, Orbital.  I`ll be heading to the used CD shop later today to refill that gap in my collection.  There is a glaring omission from the list however, in my opinion and I guess many others:  MASSIVE ATTACK.  Definitely top-10 for me, and some of the only electronica I know of that has been remastered and released in high-rez:

 

https://store.digitalstores.co.uk/massiveattack/

 

I do disagree with the opinions about true audiophilia only coming from acoustic music, and specifically classical.  While obviously awesome, there is equally awesome dynamic range and timbre from some electronica, IMO.  I have been auditioning speakers here in Tokyo recently, and I always take my DAP with a load of FLAC to do the tests.  One of my first listens is always Walking Wounded by Everything But the Girl (1996).  While I know this album is problematic for many electronic music purists, due to the group`s poppish/commercial background, it has fantastic simplicity in its drum&bass structure, relatively huge amounts of silence between all the clicking and thumping, and a relatively well-recorded organic human female voice.  Not to mention fundamentally beautiful melodies. If a speaker can become transparent while filling a room with this music, it is a very good sign.  (btw, the B&W cm8 is the best I`ve heard so far, in my budget).  This albums so good on the HD800, the louder the better!  


Edited by Dopaminer - 12/13/13 at 6:35pm
post #119 of 238

I think that audiophiles do listen to electro! 

It just happens to be a genre that not too many people listen to in general.

It also seems to have a younger audience, and they don't necessarily have the disposable income to have something better than generic earbuds. .

post #120 of 238
Thread Starter 
Even the more "mainstream" trance/house stuff(that's to not upset the genre OCD people) has some decent production value, not like modern pop music that is probably meant for iBuds.
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