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post #46 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by kotomikun View Post

I've had tinnitus for a few years. It's not as bad as it seems, at least for me. I don't really notice it most of the time.

That said, it seems to me there are two kinds of tinnitus. One is the "exposure to loud noises" type, which most doctors will assume you have, and usually comes with hearing damage (though it doesn't necessarily get worse, unless you use jackhammers without earmuffs or something).

The other is almost not really a disease, because most people probably have it, they just don't notice because their brains tune it out. This is probably what I have, since there seems to be nothing else wrong with my hearing, and I've always obsessively avoided loud noises due to hypersensitivity. My doctor said someone did a study where they put a bunch of people in a silent room for a while...half of them "spontaneously" got tinnitus. So it's not necessarily a horrible thing. But you still shouldn't pump your headphones up to ridiculous volumes.

Lol, I thought I was the only one! (Spoiler alert, you are never the only one). I keep my music relatively low, and I was shocked when I heard a ringing in my ears one night when I was trying to fall asleep. It's really really quiet, and I never hear it during the day, and for at night, I have this stuff that I spray in my nose that quiets it long enough for me to get some zzzs.
post #47 of 172

I understand how you feel. I've been listening to my music loudly for years, but I'm only a teenager so I figured I would just eventually stop and preserve my hearing. Tested my hearing with a tone generator the other day, I can only hear 15KHz. I don't even understand how it happened so quickly. I have to use headphones for the time being since I'm moving into an apartment soon, so I've got to be really careful with my volume levels until I can transition to speakers. I tend not to blast speakers as loudly as headphones due to perception of sounds around me, and even if I do it will cause a lot less hearing damage then headphones (I learned in physics class that hearing damage is squared every foot closer it is to your ears... although it may have been meter).

post #48 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by ToddTheMetalGod View Post

I understand how you feel. I've been listening to my music loudly for years, but I'm only a teenager so I figured I would just eventually stop and preserve my hearing. Tested my hearing with a tone generator the other day, I can only hear 15KHz. I don't even understand how it happened so quickly. I have to use headphones for the time being since I'm moving into an apartment soon, so I've got to be really careful with my volume levels until I can transition to speakers. I tend not to blast speakers as loudly as headphones due to perception of sounds around me, and even if I do it will cause a lot less hearing damage then headphones (I learned in physics class that hearing damage is squared every foot closer it is to your ears... although it may have been meter).

About your comment on hearing damage being squared for every foot closer. That may be true, which is why it is a bad idea to stand up close to the stage at a live show, but a pair of headphones blasting music will never get as loud as speakers.
post #49 of 172

One way to imagine how loud a headphone is relative to speakers is to close your eyes and imagine a tower/wall of speakers in front of you. It may give a better image and sense of the loudness.

And though it can't ever be as loud as speakers, it sits a lot closer to your ears. Especially iem's which take so little power to run up to ungodly volumes so close to your ears in a sealed environment.

post #50 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by bareyb View Post

Keep the volume way down. I was told just a tad louder than when you can clearly hear it.

Thanks for that tidbit. I was always curious about what volume is optimum. I have the volume sliders on everything so close to minimum (usually the first setting above barely audible) that I was wondering if I was "doing it wrong". I guess so many people either like or expect to be listening at high volumes. Then have their hearing damaged by continuous loud music, have to turn it up even higher, and it becomes a deadly cycle. I wonder how this applies to amps. Either way, I guess I should ease up on the 10-hour headphone gaming sessions.

For people mentioning ringing in a quiet room, I've read that it's normal. Humans aren't used to dead silence and the body copes by creating some noise.
post #51 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by HalidePisces View Post


Thanks for that tidbit. I was always curious about what volume is optimum. I have the volume sliders on everything so close to minimum (usually the first setting above barely audible) that I was wondering if I was "doing it wrong". I guess so many people either like or expect to be listening at high volumes. Then have their hearing damaged by continuous loud music, have to turn it up even higher, and it becomes a deadly cycle. I wonder how this applies to amps. Either way, I guess I should ease up on the 10-hour headphone gaming sessions.

For people mentioning ringing in a quiet room, I've read that it's normal. Humans aren't used to dead silence and the body copes by creating some noise.

a "quiet" room (i.e your bedroom while you sleep) will still measure at about 30-35 decibels. they are probably refeering to a quiet room such as this one, the record holder for quietest enviroment at -9 decibels http://news.discovery.com/human/life/worlds-quietest-room-will-drive-you-crazy-in-30-minutes.htm

post #52 of 172
bareyb I am really sorry for your loss. However, I think you should get a second opinion about the whole headphone thing. If you can listen to speakers, I don't see what the big deal is when it comes to headphones as long as the volume is low.

Thank you for sharing this, can't imagine how painful it's been for you. Just keep your head up and look on the bright side - at least you can still listen to music. Also you are indeed enlightening a lot of people including myself. I listen in loud environments every day and I am always conscious of how loud I am putting the volume. I always try to put it at a volume equal to that of someone speaking to me about a foot away. *shrug* I always wonder why more DAPs don't have something that measures actual db for you. I know every headphone has different impedance/sensitivity - it would be nice if there was a DAP that could adapt to each headphone and tell you exactly how many db you are listening to instead of just a little line at the bottom of your dap.

Also I agree that ear plugs by either V-MODA (faders) or Etymotics are the best way to go at concerts or any loud environment. I certainly won't be forgetting my faders the next time I head to a concert.

Anyway, my heart goes out to you buddy. Just roll with the punches like someone else said and it may be good to take up a new hobby for a while as well. Definitely get that second opinion though if you can.
Edited by roma101 - 4/10/13 at 3:24pm
post #53 of 172
Quote:
Feb. 20, 2013 — Resveratrol, a substance found in red grapes and red wine, may have the potential to protect against hearing and cognitive decline, according to a published laboratory study from Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit.

 

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130220131742.htm

post #54 of 172

I'm sorry to hear you have Tinitus. But don't give up on headphones yet! What I see in this thread is that there are others that have the same issue. You should definitely get a second opinion.

 

Thank you for sharing your story. I will remember to keep my headphone volume low.

post #55 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by bareyb View Post
there is a high pitched hiss in my ears that never stops and I hear "clicking" noises though the day and night.

 

Nice try, The Master. I'm on to you...

 

Doctor+Who+-+The+Sound+Of+Drums+Master+crazy.JPG

 

 


 

Seriously, sorry about your hearing. I wouldn't wish that on my worst enemy.

post #56 of 172

Really sorry to know that. Let's hope there may be some new discovery in medical science soon enough to solve or atennuate this at least.

 

I'm gonna be even more careful now, and take more in between breaks, which I don't usually do.

 

I think this thread should be sticked permanently to the top as advice for all headfiers.
 

post #57 of 172

I'm really sorry to hear that bareyb. If you don't mind can i ask you some questions about tinitus? Is the high pitch sound very loud or is it only noticeable when there are no sounds around you?

I have been hearing high-pitched sounds at an extremely low volume when everything is quiet ever since i was a kid. I just want to be sure that there is no problem with my hearing.


Edited by Christo4 - 4/10/13 at 4:36pm
post #58 of 172

Sorry to hear that man... You just made me turn down the volume on my headphones.

post #59 of 172

i regret getting my M-50's I had them on way too long. my first audiophile headphone purchase. I think i was listening them too loud, with closed in headphones it hard to know how loud you are listening. everything felt better when I switched to open headphones.

 

my lesson learned, open headphones will probably protect your hearing more because you notice more easily how loud they are. I have ringing that comes and goes. its not bad but it started with the M-50's. I guess i am starting to have tinnitus.

post #60 of 172

I misread the thread title, I thought it was:

 

Stick a fork in me, I'm done. Dr. Dre says "No more headphones"....:(

 

Shame dude, all the best.

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