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post #166 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by wormsdriver View Post


Hi Dr. J, what about a large hole in your eardrum? Would that impact low frequencies?

 

A hole in the ear drum = a conductive hearing loss, and the hall mark result of that is a low frequency conductive hearing loss. (not as serious as a sensori neural hearing loss, as conductive are usally not permanent)

 

Interestingly enough, the location of the hole also determines what frequencies are impacted as well.   The good news about holes in ear drums is that they usually heal over time, and even more interesting is that the eardrum is comprised of three layers of tissue, that are essentially woven, much like a spiders web.   If there is a hole, tear etc, when the ear heals, it heals in two layers rather than three.

 

A side story.  On the eve of the last day of my masters degree program...   I was playing raquetball....     I took a hard shot to the ear....  

 

The compressive force of air, blew a whole in my ear drum....   

 

I drove home with a unilateral hearing loss, fearing that I was permanently deafened in one ear.  The $5,000 stereo system in my car sound horrible as well!

 

 

Any how, after a night of no sleep, I drove back to the university, and luckily found that I just had a conductive hearing loss, due to a blown ear drum, and I would be fine over some time.

 

We had a girl in our program fall while water skiing, damaged her ear much the same way as well!

Dr. John Moulton

Here at Noble, we craft some of the finest universal and custom in-ear monitors available today. 

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post #167 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by FullCircle View Post
 

 

 

Noise induced hearing loss, impacts the high freq. range, rather than the low freq.

 

The high frequency is the 'true killer' of our ears, I've always take a sharp mind in that and in choosing any audio products..

 

So to me there are 3 dangerous things about sound :

  • High frequency is the 1st
  • Extraordinary and sudden loudness is the 2nd, constant loudness is also in this category
  • Too much bass (like ab**s headphone) maybe.. I have auditioned this headphone and couldn't stand its bass, it's banging my brain, and couldn't stand its price ...

 

And I think even I hear high frequency at low volumes the frequency still sound harsh and hurt my ears ..., be very aware with high frequency headphones ...

post #168 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by ExCelciuS View Post

The high frequency is the 'true killer' of our ears, I've always take a sharp mind in that and in choosing any audio products..

So to me there are 3 dangerous things about sound :
  • High frequency is the 1st
  • Extraordinary and sudden loudness is the 2nd, constant loudness is also in this category
  • Too much bass (like ab**s headphone) maybe.. I have auditioned this headphone and couldn't stand its bass, it's banging my brain, and couldn't stand its price ...

And I think even I hear high frequency at low volumes the frequency still sound harsh and hurt my ears ..., be very aware with high frequency headphones ...

It isn't so much that loud high freq. damage the high freq receptive area of the cochlea, the culprit is the anatomy/ shape of the cochlea. The fluid within the cochlea, as it travels and makes the bends, there is more of an erosive force through the curves, which happens to be where the high frequency receptive hair cells lay.

Low frequencies set the fluid in the cochlea in motion as well....


You may want to get your hearing tested, as it sounds like you are complaining of "recruitment". (=abnormal loudness growth).

Dr. John Moulton

Here at Noble, we craft some of the finest universal and custom in-ear monitors available today. 

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post #169 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by FullCircle View Post


It isn't so much that loud high freq. damage the high freq receptive area of the cochlea, the culprit is the anatomy/ shape of the cochlea. The fluid within the cochlea, as it travels and makes the bends, there is more of an erosive force through the curves, which happens to be where the high frequency receptive hair cells lay.

Low frequencies set the fluid in the cochlea in motion as well....


You may want to get your hearing tested, as it sounds like you are complaining of "recruitment". (=abnormal loudness growth).

No thank you :normal_smile : , I think I have nothing wrong with my ear, just want to remind that our health should be in top priority, and we can't change shape of the cochlea but we have options 

post #170 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by FullCircle View Post
 

Doctprate of audiology here....

 

Not sure if this has been mentioned yet, as I did not read all 11+ pages of this thread.

 

But there is a large list of medications that can induce hearing loss or tinnitus as well.   With any of your medications, it would be a good idea to do a google search and check and see if they are ototoxic.

 

Some examples of ototoxic drugs/medications are:

 

Aspirin, vicodin, viagra etc etc etc

Well, my slight tinnitus-ish tendencies did get a bit worse in the following months after I started taking anti-depressive. Now, I'm taking a lower dose, but it's about the same, might get better over time. If it's possible to even say so, I'd say the ringing etc. I hear would be around 30-45 dB. The ambient noise in my room with my computer on is around 35-45 dB, I'd say. I hear it faintly right now. But still, it's pretty hard to put a number on as I tend to think my brain filters a lot of it.

post #171 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by davidsh View Post

Well, my slight tinnitus-ish tendencies did get a bit worse in the following months after I started taking anti-depressive. Now, I'm taking a lower dose, but it's about the same, might get better over time. If it's possible to even say so, I'd say the ringing etc. I hear would be around 30-45 dB. The ambient noise in my room with my computer on is around 35-45 dB, I'd say. I hear it faintly right now. But still, it's pretty hard to put a number on as I tend to think my brain filters a lot of it.

Google search your meds and find out if they are ototoxic, a lot of mind altering drugs are, oxycodone, for example is.

Vicodin more than likely is what deafened, Rush Limbaugh, as that was his drug of choice. It was stated to be idiopathic, but I doubt he revealed his drug issues to the physicians initially.

Dr. John Moulton

Here at Noble, we craft some of the finest universal and custom in-ear monitors available today. 

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post #172 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by FullCircle View Post

Google search your meds and find out if they are ototoxic, a lot of mind altering drugs are, oxycodone, for example is.

Vicodin more than likely is what deafened, Rush Limbaugh, as that was his drug of choice. It was stated to be idiopathic, but I doubt he revealed his drug issues to the physicians initially.

Yeah, I already know it is ototoxic (well, I didn't know that was the word). So it's no news to me, actually. I just remembered it with your post :)

 

But luckily it doesn't seem like the ringing is very severe at all and it doesn't annoy me that much, just don't want it to get worse and I just don't like it being there, but there's not really a way around that anyway..

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