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'Glenn Miller & His Orchestra' - Music CDs?? - Page 2

post #16 of 30

So if I  understand, "the lost recordings" is the Glenn Miller record, where the  sound quality sucks the less.

post #17 of 30

Yes, but it's live versions of the hits, not the master takes that everyone knows. Get a collection of the RCA/Bluebird stuff first. They're the real deal. I linked to a dirt cheap four CD Proper Box above that has everything you'd ever want for $16. If you like those, then supplement them with the radio broadcasts.

 

It's the same with Benny Goodman. The Madhattan Room broadcasts and the Armed Forces Services Radio stuff is great and sounds good, but you want the master takes first.


Edited by bigshot - 4/9/13 at 6:17pm
post #18 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post

not the master takes that everyone knows.

Yeah, but I  don't mind. I  was first interested by a clean version of  "on the mood".

Now there are other interesting song not present on the "lost recordings", for sure.

post #19 of 30

"Clean versions" aren't important. "Good performances" are. In old stuff, if you chase sound quality instead of performance, you'll end up thinking old music is boring. That's the mistake most kids make.

 

"Chatanooga Choo Choo" and "Pennsylvania 6-5000" are iconic songs. They're a part of American history. Why wouldn't you want the same version that everyone back then was listening to? There are lots of modern cover versions to choose from if you just want sound quality. But that isn't the point with music like this.


Edited by bigshot - 4/9/13 at 9:36pm
post #20 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post

"Clean versions" aren't important. "Good performances" are. In old stuff, if you chase sound quality instead of performance, you'll end up thinking old music is boring. That's the mistake most kids make.

Perhaps .... but I got a personal compilation with the track "on the mood", and the difference of sound quality  was detracting too much jarring with other tracks, when using regular version.

I don't think that "old performance" are necessary boring, but sometimes I find it's annoying to have to guess, what's hidden behind a layer of muddiness. After all music, is not just "great performance", but "sensations" too, and muddiness remove a good part of them. I imagine that people that listened the Glenn Miller Band for true, got an unforgettable experience, and these recordings are just an "aftertaste".

post #21 of 30
Most music that kids listen to is ephemeral... intended just for today and tomorrow it will be out of style. But older music allows us to enter a time machine to the past. It doesn't matter if the window we're peering out of is a little foggy. We're getting a chance to experience what people experienced twenty, fifty or a hundred years ago. If you fully understand what you're hearing, the sound quality doesn't matter.

Surface noise can be distracting if you aren't used to it, but the more old music you listen to, the better it will sound to you. Also, don't listen to this music through headphones. It was never intended to be heard that way. Listen to it on a stereo or small boom box. Put the boom box right in the corner of a room and sit a ways away. You'll be amazed at how much better it sounds that way.

My collection of music goes from current music all the way back to Caruso in 1907. I get just as much enjoyment out of the older records as the new CDs. The reason is because I am listening to the music, not the recording. Older music is an ocean of amazing stuff, not just because it drops some heavy bass or has stone silent gaps between songs, but because the performers were fantastic musicians and played their hearts out in one continuous take three and a half minutes at a time.
post #22 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post

Also, don't listen to this music through headphones. It was never intended to be heard that way. Listen to it on a stereo or small boom box. Put the boom box right in the corner of a room and sit a ways away. You'll be amazed at how much better it sounds that way.

 

Interesting. I listened to some Glenn Miller tracks through speakers, and I thought it  was ok.

Then I switched to my hd800, and I got a "yuck" reaction.


Edited by extrabigmehdi - 4/10/13 at 11:17am
post #23 of 30

Here is an example of what I was talking about...

 

http://www.vintageip.com/xfers/princesband_porkupinerag.mp3

 

If you just listen to this song without knowing anything about it, it sounds strange and primitive. But if you know about it and how it was made, it is amazing.

 

This recording was made over 100 years ago by a bandleader named Prince. He was right at ground zero for what we now call "Jazz", but he called it "Ragtime". Earlier, his band played Sousa style marches and other military band music. But ragtime was coming into popularity and he recorded a lot of it for Columbia records.

 

This recording was made without electricity. No microphones, no tape decks. It was a purely mechanical process involving acoustic horns that funneled sound into a cutting lathe that etched a groove in a disk made of beeswax. This record was duplicated and sold to people who played it back on a phonograph that worked without electricity, using a mechanical process that was the exact inverse of the recording process.

 

Here is a photograph of Prince's Band in the recording studio. This was taken almost a decade after the recording you just heard was recorded.

 

 

 

When you play this MP3, you are listening to music from a century ago, recorded when Jazz was in its infancy. Electric lights in homes were a new thing. You're listening to sound waves etched in wax before your great grandfather was probably even born. The fact that the sound is a little imbalanced and there is surface noise doesn't matter a bit. You're hearing HISTORY.


Edited by bigshot - 4/10/13 at 11:07am
post #24 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post


When you play this MP3, you are listening to music from a century ago, recorded when Jazz was in its infancy. Electric lights in homes were a new thing. You're listening to sound waves etched in wax before your great grandfather was probably even born. The fact that the sound is a little imbalanced and there is surface noise doesn't matter a bit. You're hearing HISTORY.

Well the little surface noise, could probably reduced by the modern processing techniques , such like eq, or noise reduction.

But I get your point, and I don't hear it often. You could probably help to cure some people suffering from an "obsessive compulsive disorder" regarding sound quality, and that call themselves "audiophiles".

post #25 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by extrabigmehdi View Post

 

Interesting. I listened to some Glenn Miller tracks through speakers, and I thought it  was ok.

Then I switched to my hd800, and I got a "yuck" reaction.

 I keep a special headphone (AKG K340) around to listen to great performances recorded in less-than-ideal sound. I guess the issue is whether you want to have headphones that make you enjoy your music or music that makes you enjoy your headphones, and that of course varies from person to person, or even from day to day

post #26 of 30

oh and BTW, thanks to bigshot and LFF for the great tips on big band recordings. Keep them coming, I'd love to hear more good "dance" music from the 30s and 40s...

post #27 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post

Here is an example of what I was talking about...

 

http://www.vintageip.com/xfers/princesband_porkupinerag.mp3

 

If you just listen to this song without knowing anything about it, it sounds strange and primitive. But if you know about it and how it was made, it is amazing.

 

This recording was made over 100 years ago by a bandleader named Prince. He was right at ground zero for what we now call "Jazz", but he called it "Ragtime". Earlier, his band played Sousa style marches and other military band music. But ragtime was coming into popularity and he recorded a lot of it for Columbia records.

 

This recording was made without electricity. No microphones, no tape decks. It was a purely mechanical process involving acoustic horns that funneled sound into a cutting lathe that etched a groove in a disk made of beeswax. This record was duplicated and sold to people who played it back on a phonograph that worked without electricity, using a mechanical process that was the exact inverse of the recording process.

 

Here is a photograph of Prince's Band in the recording studio. This was taken almost a decade after the recording you just heard was recorded.

 

 

 

When you play this MP3, you are listening to music from a century ago, recorded when Jazz was in its infancy. Electric lights in homes were a new thing. You're listening to sound waves etched in wax before your great grandfather was probably even born. The fact that the sound is a little imbalanced and there is surface noise doesn't matter a bit. You're hearing HISTORY.

Amazing post bigshot. You really do "get it". beerchug.gif I'd like to buy you a drink someday.

Quote:
Originally Posted by extrabigmehdi View Post

Well the little surface noise, could probably reduced by the modern processing techniques , such like eq, or noise reduction.

But I get your point, and I don't hear it often. You could probably help to cure some people suffering from an "obsessive compulsive disorder" regarding sound quality, and that call themselves "audiophiles".

Using EQ and Noise Reduction to "clean" recordings usually has a negative impact on the recording itself. Most engineers don't know how to do it properly and most OVER DO it to the point of killing the life in the recordings. These recordings are ones you must enjoy for the historical performance and art itself...not for sound quality.


Edited by LFF - 4/10/13 at 1:54pm
post #28 of 30

These CD's were done by Time Life and contain some audiophile quality music.


THEY ARE NOT ORIGINAL EDITIONS but faithful performances of the originals. Many of these were done by the great Billy May.

post #29 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by LFF View Post

 

Using EQ and Noise Reduction to "clean" recordings usually has a negative impact on the recording itself. Most engineers don't know how to do it properly and most OVER DO it to the point of killing the life in the recordings.

I'm sure the Glenn Miller recordings recommended  on this thread, has been denoised to some extent.

post #30 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by extrabigmehdi View Post

I'm sure the Glenn Miller recordings recommended  on this thread, has been denoised to some extent.


But they have been done the proper way. By eliminating it at the source. wink_face.gif

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