Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Portable Headphones, Earphones and In-Ear Monitors › Tips for getting the best out of custom moulds
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Tips for getting the best out of custom moulds - Page 3

post #31 of 38

I remain amazed at the number of people who purport to love listening to music and will spend hundreds, even thousands, on custom IEMs, yet will risk their hearing to save a few bucks on impressions.

 

Please, people: see an audiologist, get proper impressions, and learn to take care of your hearing.

 

Here's the list of Sensaphonics-recommended audiologists, all of whom are known to be IEM-friendly.

post #32 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by JackKontney View Post

I remain amazed at the number of people who purport to love listening to music and will spend hundreds, even thousands, on custom IEMs, yet will risk their hearing to save a few bucks on impressions.

 

Please, people: see an audiologist, get proper impressions, and learn to take care of your hearing.

 

Here's the list of Sensaphonics-recommended audiologists, all of whom are known to be IEM-friendly.

I spent over a half-million on my house, but I am able to repair the plumbing, wiring, and can do minor carpentry and painting in a pinch. If the procedure can be done properly as a DIY project, there is no reason not to do so if so inclined. I understand the reasons some do not want to try it themselves, but it isn't neurosurgery. And there are numerous horror stories of audiologists charging over $100 for a procedure that, at the most, should cost no more than $40.

post #33 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by JackKontney View Post

As iamagloworm notes, Sensaphonics does not recommend using a bite block. And yes, we are Shure's recommended manufacturer of custom sleeves for their IEMs.

 

Sensaphonics has been in the business of manufacturing custom IEMs since the mid-90s, and custom earplugs long before that. Dr. Michael Santucci (founder, president, and a practicing audiologist) has developed his recommended procedure for taking impressions over the course of a lengthy career working with very demanding musicians. He actually trains other audiologists in working with musicians and taking accurate impressions, as this sort of elective equipment use (CIEMs) is not taught in university audiology curricula.

 

He notes that, while using a bite block when taking impression has become popular, there is no clinical evidence that using one - or not - will produce more accurate impressions. I should also point out that the earpiece material (acrylic vs silicone) is NOT a factor. (Manufacturing technique, OTOH, is a huge factor in creating properly fitting custom IEMs.)

 

Factually speaking, the shape of the ear canal does change with jaw/facial movement. But the WAY in which it changes (direction, degree, shape) is truly individual and not predictable. As the jaw opens, some canals get wider; others get narrower. And by varying amounts. Maddening, but clinically verifiable.

 

So there is no universal solution. And anyone who tells you differently is, IMHO, selling snake oil. Sorry.

My feeling as well but it may be better to find your natural relaxed jaw position which is not necessarily closed. For many this would be 1/4" to 1/2" open. I'm sure that forward to back jaw position is just as important so finding something to hold and stabilize things is required. Of course, this becomes so subjective that your way may be better for consistency but it think a bit open is better for all around use like eating and some speaking while still comfy for normal use and jaw position.

 

The 1" bite block came from the original use for performers that open wide to sing etc. 1" is about the 1/2 way point. For mere mortals something less is probably better. I turned the bite block on it's side when I did mine. 

post #34 of 38
Mine were done with a 1" block. They are only tips not full CIEM's. They seal really well and are quite comfortable. They give a "full" sensation which means that I am always concious that I am wearing them. Is that usual or would I have been better with a smaller bite block as above?
post #35 of 38

My tips for good ear impressions would be the following:

 

  • See a fully qualified audiologist who can send you to be checked by an ENT if he sees anything weird in your ear (happened to me, turned out to be nothing) and who has experience with iems
  • Follow the instructions of the ciem company, they have a specific process adapted to their own iems. I have seen / heard of three different types of processes so far:
  1. The classic acrylic ciem process, with open mouth (using bite block or two fingers - I used two fingers for my Miracles and the fit is perfect). The reason for the open mouth is to have slightly tighter impressions, to compensate for the hollow material
  2. The second type of process is for silicon, and they usually asked for closed mouth, as the density of the material does not require such tight fit. I did it this way for the SE5 and have not received them yet.
  3. The third process is the Fitear process where you have to move you jaw up and down and sideways. According to a friend who has 335s, the fit is the best he encountered, but much shallower in the canal, the fit relying more on the outer ear ? In my opinion, this is good, because the canal is a sensitive muccousy membrane, not supposed to be tampered with too much

 

Well that's just my two cents.

post #36 of 38

@Mimouille: your description of the different approaches to taking impressions is fairly accurate, but your characterization of how they are used (1=acrylic, 2=silicone, 3=fitear) is not. For instance, Sensaphonics products are all silicone with a very deep fit, but the third process you describe is how Dr. Santucci instructs his customers when doing their impressions.

 

 

@Ivabign:

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

If the procedure can be done properly as a DIY project, there is no reason not to do so if so inclined. I understand the reasons some do not want to try it themselves, but it isn't neurosurgery. And there are numerous horror stories of audiologists charging over $100 for a procedure that, at the most, should cost no more than $40.

1. The key phrase is "done properly." I am suggesting that a DIY approach is, by definition, not proper. This is not just about getting a fit and saving a few bucks, but about safety and hearing health.

2. If you think spending an extra $50 or $60 for professional services is a "horror story," imagine how you would feel about permanent ear damage. Is it neurosurgery? Obviously not, and no one is claiming that it is. But it is not trivial, and there are definite risks.

post #37 of 38
I was just talking based ony experience smily_headphones1.gif I am sure much is to be added / corrected.
post #38 of 38

I like shallow fir but every ear is different. You need to reach a bend or ridge for it to stay put. I also am not into that 'full feeling. awareness perhaps but just that with a seal. Probably easier to do with silicone. The other side of that is that if you get something that needs a minor adjustment or you want to do some yourself, silicone is not that conducive..

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Portable Headphones, Earphones and In-Ear Monitors › Tips for getting the best out of custom moulds