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Sunglass-Fi, The Optics Info Thread - Page 3

post #31 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tsujigiri View Post

Good point. I haven't really worried about that so much because based on the guides I've seen, my face seems the closest to an oval shape, which can supposedly get away with anything. Personally, though, I think other factors like how high they sit on your face or how wide the nose bridge is make a bigger impact on how good they'll look on a given person.

 

I tried a few glasses out - squarish frames seemed to work best as they gave my face more definition, but some rounder frames worked as well, although a common factor was them not being too large otherwise they seemed to swamp my face. This was just in a Sunglasses Hut though - you've got me all interested in the indie brands now, so thanks for the top thread!


Edited by Somnambulist - 6/2/13 at 9:42am
post #32 of 42
Thread Starter 

Good luck in your search! There are definitely a lot of bargains to be had with the lesser known indie brands. When they do pop up on sites like eBay, there are often very few bidders, and it's not unheard of to score a pair of high end sunglasses for less than any of Sunglass Hut's mid-tier models would cost in store.

post #33 of 42

Cool, I'll keep an eye out now I know what suits me, although the ultimate test is putting them on and seeing how they look on you. I'd like to see this thread become a proper '-Fi' one, although given we only see the sun here occasionally I won't be able to contribute most of the year. :(

 

I was speaking with Jude during the UK meet the other month and one of the things that we both love was that on HF you have all these type of threads for things totally unrelated to audio/headphones where there's a wealth of knowledge and good advice. Go us. *pats on back all round*


Edited by Somnambulist - 6/2/13 at 4:27pm
post #34 of 42
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Somnambulist View Post

Cool, I'll keep an eye out now I know what suits me, although the ultimate test is putting them on and seeing how they look on you. I'd like to see this thread become a proper '-Fi' one, although given we only see the sun here occasionally I won't be able to contribute most of the year. :(

 

I was speaking with Jude during the UK meet the other month and one of the things that we both love was that on HF you have all these type of threads for things totally unrelated to audio/headphones where there's a wealth of knowledge and good advice. Go us. *pats on back all round*


That's a very good point. I've frequented a lot of forums and enjoy my time on those boards, but none are as diverse as Head-Fi. Some are more oriented towards tools and practical equipment, where most members would scoff at the idea of dishing out so much for nonessential items like headphones, while others are oriented so much towards luxury items that many members would consider you a barbarian for even owning a pocket knife. HF seems to have a good mix of all the interests hobbyists enjoy.

post #35 of 42
post #36 of 42

I have been wearing a pair of Costa del Mar Man O Wars for a few years now. They are really comfortable and seem to fit my big noggin well. There is some really good info in this thread. I probably won't be buying the same thing in the future with so many good choices out there. I am always looking for the best bang/buck performer anyways, and I figured out a long time ago that Oakley and similar brands are just charging entirely too much for their products. Anyone have any info on Calcutta sunglasses?

post #37 of 42
Thread Starter 

I haven't heard of Calcutta sunglasses. I have heard very good things about Costa's optics, particularly if you're using them on the water. I would have liked to have tried one of their models out, but I don't spend that much time on the water and I couldn't find a frame I liked. Serengeti and Maui Jim are fairly similar in that they put a lot of effort into the optics and produce a good quality "mid-fi" product. The Maui's are typically more expensive than the other two, but if you break your sunglasses they'll repair them free of charge, even if it's your fault.

post #38 of 42
Thread Starter 

Here's a pair of Mykita Icco's in their new British Racing Green color. They've introduced this color to a lot of their Mylon frames, but I haven't seen many photos of them in natural light. So here's what they look like; the color is a nice dark green in person.

 

 

post #39 of 42
Thread Starter 

Here's my newest acquisition: a Loree Rodkin Hunter in Slate. They're made by Sama, a respected high end company that makes their frames in Japan. Loree Rodkin's line has some unique options for people who want a little more flair in their frames, but are put off by the bad taste most of the Chrome Hearts models appear to be designed with. It also doesn't help that it seems like CH's line was named by a 13 year old. I'm sure I'm not the only one who would be hesitant to put a frame named "Rumpleforeskin" or "Taint" on my face. In any case, I'm pretty impressed with the quality of these Sama sunglasses. Check out the intricate pattern in the frame around the lenses, and the design put into the nosepiece holders. The lenses are gradient with an antireflective coating, and the frames are made of titanium. The little black inserts on the sides of the frames are leather, and the skull design piece is sterling silver.

 

 

 

post #40 of 42
Thread Starter 

I took a trip to Berlin last week and thought I'd drop by two of my favorite optics makers, IC! Berlin and Mykita. Both are made in Berlin and use a similar sheetmetal frame design, although they have branched out to plastic frames as well.

 

 

 

Both had helpful staff and well-stocked showrooms. At Mykita, I learned that the Mylon models are adjustable to fit the user as advertised, but due to the material the process for doing so is a little different from that of regular wire-core acetate frames. Instead of being able to just bend the arms without tools to suit you, the Mylon frames require the use of a machine that applies heat and makes the alteration. Also, I noticed at IC! Berlin that they are incorporating a small change in their design to some of their newer frames. The hinge has one extra bend in it that stops the arms from springing out when they are folded in. This was my main gripe with their design, as it makes it difficult to carry their frames around clipped into a shirt.

post #41 of 42
Thread Starter 

Here's a pair from Salt Optics, a relatively new company that has quickly gained recognition among opticians. Like Barton Perreira, they were founded by former Oliver Peoples employees who were not satisfied with the direction the company was taking. They have focused a lot of their efforts on the quality of the lenses they place in their frames, and are one of the only high end optics companies to do so. Their signature feature is the decentering of the optics, which reduces the distorting prism effect that occurs when your eye is not in the optical center of the lens. I find their optics to be quite good; very clear with good polarization and an antireflective coating on the back. This frame is one of the few models that is available with glass lenses, while most models come with lenses made of CR-39. The workmanship of the frames is also quite good; I particularly like the tapered arms found on some models like this Lester frame. They are unusually sturdy and free of play for wire frames, and the shape ensures that the frames bend to fit your face towards the end of the temples rather than the front of the frame.

 

 

post #42 of 42

I use four...

 

1. AO Original Pilot

 

2. AO Saratoga

 

3. AO Sea Lord

 

4. AO Airman


Edited by LFF - 11/20/13 at 2:26am
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