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How to properly break in headphones - Page 2

post #16 of 37
Lol, that's weird. You'd think that the factory would test (100+ hours) these units to make sure all the parts are functioning smoothly. You sure it wasn't you that required 300 hours mold in to get used to the sound of SACD playback? Because when I bought my first hi-end cans (Sennheiser HD600), it still took me a while to get used to the sound even after the initial hardware break in period.

Current pushing.. you mean like similar effect to cable break in?
post #17 of 37
The only way to incorrectly break in headphones is to play the music way too freakin' loud and blow the drivers. Break in occurs under natural use. When people talk about "breaking in" their headphones, they are simply playing either specially made tones or music with a lot of dynamics and range to expedite the process.

There is no right or wrong way, and if you just use your headphones they will eventually break in.

More important than a physical break in of headphones is a psychological break in... don't throw phones away until you've really listened to them for a few weeks.
post #18 of 37
Actually, I don't believe in paying for "burn-in" discs, that's ridiculous. I just play my music at normal volume and actually listen during the breaking in period so that I can get used to it better. No sense in receiving something cool that you're totally stoked about and not using it for first week just so that you can run nasty sounding bullcrap through it. I mean, WTF?

Psychological molding does play a role, but for enjoying only. You can get a general sense of what the cans sound like after a few hours of break in, but it takes a long time to really get the feel for them and end up liking them. If you don't like it, you'd have disliked them from begining on to end...
post #19 of 37
Does psychological break in include relearning how to listen to music?

For example, when I got my ER-6, I thought I had to no bass and I thought I was inserting them in wrong. But after listening to them for a week and comparing to my old heapdhones, I can now hear the equivalent sounds that make up the bass in my old heapdhones and in the ER-6. The bass just sounds really different in the ER-6. Is this psychological break in?
post #20 of 37
Quote:
Originally posted by pedxing
Is this psychological break in?
Probably more like "re-educating" your ears.
post #21 of 37
ped, no that's revelation, as in graduating from mass market brainwash override course.
post #22 of 37
Quote:
Originally posted by Audio&Me
Lol, that's weird. You'd think that the factory would test (100+ hours) these units to make sure all the parts are functioning smoothly.
Most, if not all, factories never test every single unit that comes out of it. They test samples from runs, and then give the thumbs up or the thumbs down to the whole run. If its the thumbs down, then they go and do a more thorough testing, maybe on all of the units, or maybe just to isolate the problem. (Capacitor putter-inner #97 was having a bad day, so only the units that went through his line are bad...)
post #23 of 37
Just a bit off topic but do burn-in discs act the same with both speakers and headphones?
post #24 of 37
Quote:
Originally posted by ChrisL
Just a bit off topic but do burn-in discs act the same with both speakers and headphones?
Yes. It is the same. Usually the Burn-in CD has added features for testing out speakers, e.g. Channel Identification, Clap Track, etc.
post #25 of 37
Quote:
With the Sony SACD players, its been widely reported in both print and at audio asylum that these machines seem to require 300 hours burn-in to sound their best
Yes, you have to use up 1/4 of the lifespan of the laser before it works properly. Same as cables, they need 4000 hours of signal passing through them before the cable realizes it's doing a good job and smiles for you. And don't forget your component stand. The equipment must sit on that stand for at least 50,000 hours before the stand begins to sound right. If you take it apart and rebuilt it 10 times, you will only require 1000 hours to burn it in. And you have to make sure it's a leap year, otherwise it's another four years until you can hear your components properly. Even those green making pens (for edges of CD's) need break-in. You have to make about 400 "COMPONENTS ON STRIKE!" placards before the chemicals in the ink cure properly

I found the same thing with light bulbs. It was only after 1000 hours that the light being emitted was of quality enough for me to properly see where I was going. My toaster? Needed 4000 pieces of bread through it before it tasted right. Not to mention my new floors. I had to walk over them for months on end before I even realized I was in my own house.

Then my wife told me to just close my eyes and everything was fine.
post #26 of 37
Personaly I have been burning in my HD595's for about 15hrs now with 'Techmaster P.E.B.'. They sound 1000x's better now than they did new. I think im going to let them go anouther 15 or so before I get really into them. AS for the volume, its at almost MAX which is my normal volume
post #27 of 37

I like

I like to use a tuner to break in amps and headphone or speakers. i find it far more difficult to break in speakers than headphones though as i only like to play music i want to hear throughout the house. whereas headphones i can stick under a pillow or something.

no a nice compressed radio station (I prefer the mexican dance music station) will get a component burnt in real quick. for cd players i just put in prodigy fat of the land on repeat.

the hard thing for me to break in is going to be the PA system i am building. how am i going to pump sufficient voltage through 18 inch drivers for 100+ hours without shaking the house down?

i must say though that the whole idea of burn in cds or pink noise really bothers me a little though. unless you have a room that is dedicated but even then, it just rubs my spirit the wrong way that we are so priviledged to own such systems but not even play >>>music<<< through them.

whenever i go to CES or other sudio shows i always hear some folks in other rooms slip up occasionally and put on the pink noise track. it is so loud it chases everryone
out of the room and probably a little ringing in the ears. that sounds likke a good way to get customers to me eh?

Clark
post #28 of 37
I used to connect, what ever needed burn-in, to a tuner. Then, it stroke me that FM braodcast only has a frequency response of 50-15000Hz, and I started to use my old CDP on repeat instead. However, lately I have started to appreciate to actually follow the burn-in, by listening for most of the time. Very rewarding!
post #29 of 37
It makes no difference how you break them in, they are not going to turn out sounding any different! I just got my HD650's, and I have a total of 20 hours on them. I am listening to them right now, as I type, and they sound wonderful. Down the road, if they improve, then all the better!
post #30 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheechoz
It makes no difference how you break them in, they are not going to turn out sounding any different! I just got my HD650's, and I have a total of 20 hours on them. I am listening to them right now, as I type, and they sound wonderful. Down the road, if they improve, then all the better!
I agree to a certain degree here. My impression and experience is that head-phones show a less "dramatic" change after some time of operation than e.g. cables and amps.

EDIT: These impressions are of course general in their nature.
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