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Motorcycle Audio Setup Advise

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

     I am looking at improving my listening pleasure while riding my Motorcycle.  I current use either an iPad Shuffle or my iPhone 4s.  I use Got Ears?® Brand Challenger Custom Molded Isolation Earphones.  I've never been overly impressed with them but they are comfortable and dont hurt me.  Because they are "in-Ear" I dont have an issue with low volume.  The issue I have is low Bass.  I can get better Bass with some $50 sony ear buds but they hurt my ear over time while wearing a helmet.  I've been told that a mini amp would resolve the low Bass issue.

 

     Another concern is I may go to in-Helmet speakers in the future, and if I do Volume would be an issue at speed due to wind noise ect.

 

Questions. 

 

1.  Will a mini Amp help in this situation (enough to justify the cost)?

 

2.  As far as mini AMP's go, I am looking between the Eo2i, E6, E11 and C&C BH.  I don't want overkill but I don't want something ineffective.  Opinions and recommendations?

 

3.  Connect via the headphone jack or LOD cable (if so which one)?

 

Thanks for any edvice in advance.

post #2 of 13
Thread Starter 

Has anyone run across this?

post #3 of 13
OK, I have to say this just so that I can rest easy at night.. When I lived in the UK I was amongst many things an institute of advanced motorists motorcycle instructor. My passion were motorcycles and motorcyclists. I also used to be a special constable and have attended more than enough fatal RTA's involving motorcyclists!

My biggest passion though was to keep motorcyclists alive and well so that they could fully enjoy the wonders of motorcycling for many years to come.

The only thing you should be listening to as you ride is the noise of other traffic in close proximity to you and ALL of your attention should be focused on the job in hand, enjoying safely the riding. Listening to music is the last thing you should be doing, that is if you want to live a long and healthy motorcycling life! Lack of concentration is the biggest killer in motorcycling!

There. I have preached now I can go. Keep safe out there brother.
Edited by ianmedium - 3/22/13 at 8:46am
post #4 of 13

I was thinking the exact same ^ Ianmedium... and that's why I hadn't answered the OPs original post. 

 

Also... Yes any amp, like the ones mentioned, especially the E11 & BH can improve bass but another thing worth mentioning is that when you have to turn music up to drown out background wind noise you will also be listening to your music at serious decibel levels which will damage your hearing.

 

Motorcycling is already an extremely dangerous mode of transport without adding another possible factor into the mix. I have two brothers who were both seriously injured in seperate bike accidents, my older brother Steve's arm is bolted to his shoulder blade and one of my younger brothers legs is now shorter than the other but at least they both made it.  

 

Sorry for preaching but please don't do it, take all precautions to be as safe as you possibly can be.... you only live once and you also only get one set of ears... you'll end up having to wear iem's permanently... in the form of hearing aids. wink.gif


Edited by Ari33 - 3/22/13 at 10:08am
post #5 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by ianmedium View Post

OK, I have to say this just so that I can rest easy at night.. When I lived in the UK I was amongst many things an institute of advanced motorists motorcycle instructor. My passion were motorcycles and motorcyclists. I also used to be a special constable and have attended more than enough fatal RTA's involving motorcyclists!

My biggest passion though was to keep motorcyclists alive and well so that they could fully enjoy the wonders of motorcycling for many years to come.

The only thing you should be listening to as you ride is the noise of other traffic in close proximity to you and ALL of your attention should be focused on the job in hand, enjoying safely the riding. Listening to music is the last thing you should be doing, that is if you want to live a long and healthy motorcycling life! Lack of concentration is the biggest killer in motorcycling!

There. I have preached now I can go. Keep safe out there brother.

 

+1

 

I have to agree, you dont want to block out the outside world on a bike - you need to be aware of your surroundings 100% of the time.

Use earplugs to reduce noise and still be able to enjoy the exhaust soundtrack  biggrin.gif

 

Listening to music will not only distract you, but will also affect your riding...try to listening to fast rock music and stay within the speed limits (or at least within sensible speeds) 

post #6 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by kryten123 View Post

+1

I have to agree, you dont want to block out the outside world on a bike - you need to be aware of your surroundings 100% of the time.
Use earplugs to reduce noise and still be able to enjoy the exhaust soundtrack  biggrin.gif


Listening to music will not only distract you, but will also affect your riding...try to listening to fast rock music and stay within the speed limits (or at least within sensible speeds) 
I have a motorcycle as my only vehicle and I have to disagree. Most bikers on long rides use earplugs to protect their hearing from helmet wind noise, which can truly damage your hearing. Earphones at low volume will accomplish much the same thing. The key to motorcycle safety is to have well-placed mirrors and look closely before you execute lane-changes. I often flash my high-beams when coming onto intersections where anyone is turning. Wearing a bright helmet and bright riding clothes also helps. Your greater torque and acceleration helps you avoid many threats ahead of time.
post #7 of 13
Also, I use X10 earphones under my helmet because they have the least profile outside the ears of all universal IEMs that I've seen. I got them cheap, so I won't be as sad when the wires fray from putting on and taking off a properly snug helmet.
post #8 of 13
Thread Starter 

     Thanks everyone for the replies.  I appreciate all the advise and concern about safety, and please dont take offense to this.  I've riden and raced motorcycles for over 20 years (Motocross), I've been a Police Officer for almost 20 years, and I've Been a Commercial Helicopter Pilot for 10 years (Flight Instructor).  I've got multiple ways to hurt, injure, or kill myself.  I take safety precautions with everything.  Listening to music while riding does not effect my safety, in my opinion.  Eye's wide open, knowing my riding limits and practicing safe riding habits are far more effective than hearing the out of control car .125 seconds before they hit me.  Hearing my exhaust does nothing for me, and traction in twisties is felt not heard.

 

     But I digress.  I was wondering if you guys had run across this question in the past.  You guys are the hands down experts, so if anyone knows it would be you.

post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by disastermouse View Post


I have a motorcycle as my only vehicle and I have to disagree. Most bikers on long rides use earplugs to protect their hearing from helmet wind noise, which can truly damage your hearing. Earphones at low volume will accomplish much the same thing. The key to motorcycle safety is to have well-placed mirrors and look closely before you execute lane-changes. I often flash my high-beams when coming onto intersections where anyone is turning. Wearing a bright helmet and bright riding clothes also helps. Your greater torque and acceleration helps you avoid many threats ahead of time.

In the past, I've also had a bike as my only transport through summer and winter. Although I agree that you shouldn't be relying on external sounds to know what is going on around you and should be using your eyes, planning well ahead and knowing your limits, I personally found that music affected my concentration.

I tried replacing my earplugs with earphones and it definitely affected my riding as my concentration kept slipping to the music. I also found that fast pounding music affected how fast I rode.

post #10 of 13

Being an avid motorcyclist  also (15k miles per year) I completely understand where you are coming from. I use to use a set of ER6 but had the issue of them getting uncomfortable after a while or they would pop out when I would stand on my pegs to stretch my legs, I ride an adventure bike.  They were great for noise isolation but allowed enough sound through for me to hear horns and sirens.

 

I now use a set of custom ear plugs with in helmet speakers (Schueberth SRC). This is blue-toothed to my gps where I can get directions and music. It also allows me to receive and make phones calls on the bike hands free.

 


I have a set of W4R IEM that I am going to try this summer with my new Arai Adventure helmet. They isolate really well and are tight enough that they may not bother me during my long rides. They definitely like to be amped (Fiio E12) and have enough bass for any bass head out there.

 

Just have to figure out how to keep the ipod and E12 waterproof but accessible.

post #11 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by goodtill View Post

Being an avid motorcyclist  also (15k miles per year) I completely understand where you are coming from. I use to use a set of ER6 but had the issue of them getting uncomfortable after a while or they would pop out when I would stand on my pegs to stretch my legs, I ride an adventure bike.  They were great for noise isolation but allowed enough sound through for me to hear horns and sirens.

 

I now use a set of custom ear plugs with in helmet speakers (Schueberth SRC). This is blue-toothed to my gps where I can get directions and music. It also allows me to receive and make phones calls on the bike hands free.

 


I have a set of W4R IEM that I am going to try this summer with my new Arai Adventure helmet. They isolate really well and are tight enough that they may not bother me during my long rides. They definitely like to be amped (Fiio E12) and have enough bass for any bass head out there.

 

Just have to figure out how to keep the ipod and E12 waterproof but accessible.

I'm on a 1200GS so the standing and stretching is sometimes a problem also.  I've got the Got-Ears Challenger custom IEM.  They fit well and are confortable but there isn't much base.  The volume is fine, just not enough bass.  Would the Fiio E02i give me a nice boost in bass or would I need to go to a Fiio E11, OR.........are the Challenger IEM's a lost cause for bass and should I just puchase a new pair of IEM's?

post #12 of 13

Gary at Electricavenues has a PA2V2 amp version for hardwiring into a bike. Something you might possibly be interested in. His service is top notch, as can be seen in the PA2V2 threads. Not sure if this is no questions guaranteed for life, but the PA2V2 is.

 

http://www.electric-avenues.com/amplirider.html


Edited by nick n - 3/25/13 at 6:22pm
post #13 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by nick n View Post

Gary at Electricavenues has a PA2V2 amp version for hardwiring into a bike. Something you might possibly be interested in. His service is top notch, as can be seen in the PA2V2 threads. Not sure if this is no questions guaranteed for life, but the PA2V2 is.

 

http://www.electric-avenues.com/amplirider.html

 

 

I'm looking for a little more of a "Simple" set-up, but thanks for the response.

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