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What is the cut-off Frequency?  

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

I have a *.flac file that reports to be CDDA with 100% probability.

 


 

AUDIOCHECKER v2.0 beta (build 457) - by Dester - opdester@freemail.hu
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
-=== DO NOT EDIT THIS FILE! ===-
 
Path: ...\Desktop
 
1 -=- 09 - Celldweller feat. Styles Of Beyond - Shapeshifter.flac -=- CDDA (100%)
 
246507972

 

but the SAME file I saw in wave form in Spectro. The result shows that the cut-off frequency is 18KHz.

 

 

 

 

How on earth is is possible? Which program is best to determine lossless quality?

LOSSLESS files are supposed to have an average cut-off frequency of 22KHz &

LOSSY files are supposed to have an average cut-off frequency of 18KHz.

 

how come the same audio file gives different results? Is the file lossy or lossless?


Edited by Redlah - 3/16/13 at 9:05am
post #2 of 14
Thread Starter 

Oh! come on . .12 views but no replies yet. Somebody help me out !

 

BUMP !

post #3 of 14
Thread Starter 

BUMP !

post #4 of 14

Any chance you could post a link to the actual file.  Kind of hard to give any meaningful comment without being able to look at the file ourselves .....

post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brooko View Post

Any chance you could post a link to the actual file.  Kind of hard to give any meaningful comment without being able to look at the file ourselves .....

 

 

The file : http://www.mediafire.com/download.php?45h6nkuq939gdvb

post #6 of 14

Really weird.  I agree - in Audacity it looks like it's been relatively cleanly cut at around 18K.  Was this a CD rip - or a download?  If it was a download (ie torrent), I'm wondering if someone's doctored it - then re-encoded it.  Only way to tell for sure would be to get the CD of the same mastered version, rip it, and compare waveforms.

 

Sorry I can't be any more help.

post #7 of 14
Thread Starter 

I downloaded the archive from [Mod Edit: Please don't link to pirate sites.]

 

The source of the encode is a mystery because there were never any Audio CD released for NFS:Most Wanted Soundtracks. If there was, I'd be the first one to buy it. Yesterday I spent 5 hours to manually download the songs one by one. There are 26 tracks in total of which I intended to download 16 tracks.Rest are like instrumentals. After spending 5 hours I managed to collect 14 of them.

 

Then I accidentally found the link to this archive.


I'm sure the upload is a fake. I just wanted to confirm it because I also noticed the clean cut around 18KHz. Thank you for your reply.


Now, what do you mean by "someone's doctored it - then re-encoded it" ? Do you mean Audio CD was burnt with lossy tracks-then it was encoded with lossless codec ??

 

I just want to know.

post #8 of 14

using software like Audacity, one can edit the audio file, then re-encode it. I've done it to add a few extra seconds of silence to the end of a track. Others may perform much more serious audio changes...

post #9 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by vertical View Post

Others may perform much more serious audio changes...

Good joke. :D /// To add silence before or after audio I use Sony Sound Forge or Adobe Audition.

 

I just don't know how can one possibly create a lossless audio file from a lossy audio file. That's the question. 

post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Redlah View Post

Good joke. :D /// To add silence before or after audio I use Sony Sound Forge or Adobe Audition.

 

I just don't know how can one possibly create a lossless audio file from a lossy audio file. That's the question. 

 

You can transcode any lossy file to lossless.  All it's doing though is adding size (nothing else).  It's a waste of time doing it - but you'd be surprised how many torrents claiming to be lossless are actually itunes aac256 re-encoded.  Maybe someone's idea of a joke?  Doesn't matter though when you're buying CD and ripping yourself (which is what I do).

post #11 of 14

^^^ I might be misunderstanding your question and pointing out the totally obvious here, but it would be very easy (but inadvisable) to create a lossless file type (say, FLAC) from a lossy file.  The most obvious would be to make an MP3, convert to WAV, then encode to FLAC.  Encoding to FLAC doesn't replace the info that was lost when the MP3 was created.  I'm sure there are probably other ways to do it more directly, but you get the idea.  The same could be done with a compressed stream or whatever.  A FLAC is only as good as the file used to create it. 

 

I mean, if there was never an officially released audio CD (WAV) of what you're talking about, you have to ask yourself what format(s) it was even originally available in.  I'm not about to check into it, but that could easily be your answer.

 

Again, sorry if I'm missing the mark here and just not understanding the situation.   

 

Edit to say I'm addressing the OP here.


Edited by s m @ - 3/17/13 at 12:10pm
post #12 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brooko View Post

 

You can transcode any lossy file to lossless.  All it's doing though is adding size (nothing else).  It's a waste of time doing it - but you'd be surprised how many torrents claiming to be lossless are actually itunes aac256 re-encoded.  Maybe someone's idea of a joke?  Doesn't matter though when you're buying CD and ripping yourself (which is what I do).

Transcoding to lossless from lossy is a waste of time & space. I & my brother have an entire rack full of original CD's. I also rip the CD myself like you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by s m @ View Post

^^^ I might be misunderstanding your question and pointing out the totally obvious here, but it would be very easy (but inadvisable) to create a lossless file type (say, FLAC) from a lossy file.  The most obvious would be to make an MP3, convert to WAV, then encode to FLAC.  Encoding to FLAC doesn't replace the info that was lost when the MP3 was created.  I'm sure there are probably other ways to do it more directly, but you get the idea.  The same could be done with a compressed stream or whatever.  A FLAC is only as good as the file used to create it. 

 

I mean, if there was never an officially released audio CD (WAV) of what you're talking about, you have to ask yourself what format(s) it was even originally available in.  I'm not about to check into it, but that could easily be your answer.

 

Again, sorry if I'm missing the mark here and just not understanding the situation.   

 

Edit to say I'm addressing the OP here.

I took an mp3 > converted it to WAV > transcoded it to FLAC. BUT the final flac was lossy according to audiochecker.

I uploaded the audio file so that you can see it. I have absolutely no idea how or why audiochecker shows that audio (having cut-off 18KHz) to be CDDA !

 

And if you'd have visited the link to the forum you'd see that I reported the upload to be Fake. The uploader hasen's said anything yet.

post #13 of 14

Since it's a game soundtrack, maybe they ripped it from the game's CD somehow, and these files were never in lossless format in the first place? It wouldn't be unusual for a game to have compressed music files. I think that's a pretty normal thing actually.

 

Can't say I know why it would be shown as accurate by the checker thingy. 

post #14 of 14

Wow, you downloaded a pirated rip and it is bad? Go and buy the music!

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