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Decrease headphone volume

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
Like the title says, I want to decrease the overall volume of my headphones. I have thought about making an 3.5mm male to female adapter with some resistors built in. Would it work? Should I solder one resistor on the tip and another on the middle? And how much Ω should they have?
Edit: Could I use a variable resistor? :O
Edited by UnknownAX - 3/11/13 at 8:02am
post #2 of 17
Thread Starter 
2x 200ohm did the job smily_headphones1.gif Next step are variable resistors and integration into a cable/Jack...
post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 
I'm not 100% sure, but I think the resistor made the sound less detailed/clear. I'm using carbon resistors, would metal ones be better?
post #4 of 17

Introducing any components into the signal path is always going to affect the sound. Kiwame resistors are supposed to be very good. These are carbon and yes carbon resistors are supposed to sound more natural. Also why dont you just turn down the volume the normal way? i.e using the volume knob.

post #5 of 17

That depends on the output power and the input sensitivity of your    headphones and sorry to say the price. 

As they are to you too loud and you have lost clarity   is it  just the type of  headphones used that arent so open. You need to specify them so that others may get an idea of the quality of them.Because to hear the difference between carbon and metal resistors you need good quality ones

If you have high quality ones then metal will give a more clearer response /on the negative side it will show up any  problems with your system more .Thats why a top system can hear the difference easily and it wont effect the quality of reproduction as all parts are very good.
 

post #6 of 17
Thread Starter 
The headphones(~40ohm, Sony xb500) are so low-fi, you definitely don't hear any little differences with them. I just think that the sound is (even less :P) clear when I lower the volume using 2x 200ohm resistors. It was just an experiment, and I used regular carbon resistors.
Edited by UnknownAX - 3/12/13 at 3:45pm
post #7 of 17

Ok, that makes sense. Normally in modern amplifiers the volume control works by reducing the amount of voltage that the amp is using.

post #8 of 17

Don't do it that way.

 

Either use the volume control on the amplifier or whatever source you are using, or put a resistor divider (not just a single resistor) or a pot (variable resistor) between the source and the amplifier. You'll need a dual-gang (stereo) pot.

 

 

 

Putting a resistor between the output and the phones will almost certainly have a negative effect on the sound.

 

w

post #9 of 17
Thread Starter 
Makes sense, but I have no problems with turning the volume knob of an amp smily_headphones1.gif

But when I'm away from home and I'm listening to my headphones using my mobile, the volume can't be set low enough on the mobile. And mods on the software side make the sound bad.

So I wanted to make a 3,5mm male/female adapter with some resistors built in. Would there be another way that wouldn't effect sound quality as much?
post #10 of 17

Transformers (FTMFW!) 

 

http://www.head-fi.org/t/553094/continued-sidetrack-discussion-from-tiniest-portable-amp-i-can-build-nikongod-microtransformer-based-impedance-step-down-box

 

If output impedance matters (sometimes it does, particularly with multi-way-IEMs), any practical resistor divider has WAY more output impedance than those transformers.  

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by wakibaki View Post

Putting a resistor between the output and the phones will almost certainly have a negative effect on the sound.

 

 

With many headphones the effect is quite positive. 


Edited by nikongod - 3/13/13 at 11:12am
post #11 of 17

Quote:
Originally Posted by nikongod View Post

With many headphones the effect is quite positive. 

 

How about these particular ones?

 


Quote:
Originally Posted by UnknownAX View Post

The headphones(~40ohm, Sony xb500)

 

post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by wakibaki View Post

How about these particular ones?

 

 

It sounded like you were talking about all headphones. No, I haven't tried the headphones the OP has. Have you? 

post #13 of 17
Thread Starter 
I'll get some lasmex-h75's (45ohm) pretty soon, so the "thing that I am going to build" should work with them, too.
So, is there anything that I could put between the source and the headphones in order to lower the volume.
It shouldn't affect the sound quality too badly.
post #14 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by nikongod View Post

Transformers (FTMFW!) 

 

http://www.head-fi.org/t/553094/continued-sidetrack-discussion-from-tiniest-portable-amp-i-can-build-nikongod-microtransformer-based-impedance-step-down-box

 

If output impedance matters (sometimes it does, particularly with multi-way-IEMs), any practical resistor divider has WAY more output impedance than those transformers.  

 

 

With many headphones the effect is quite positive. 

 

 

LISTEN TO THIS MAN!!!

 

He knows what he is talking about.  I have made at least a half dozen resistive impedance adapters over the decade (anywhere from 75 - 300 ohms) and to my ears output transformer attenuation sounds MUCH better.  The transformers present the amp with the optimal impedance load it "wants" to see, and I think the end result is cleaner, smoother less congested amplification circuit.  Bass extends deeper and is smoother overall.  Bass impact while deeper, also has cleaner initial impact.

 

I now use OTs on my darkvoice and Earmax tube amps.  I even use it on my 18V / OPA2107 Cmoy with the RS1 and it sounds much better.  FWIW, all my cans are under 65 ohms except the HD580.

 

 

 

 

Works great with 16 ohm IEMs and OTL amps too.


Edited by kramer5150 - 3/13/13 at 11:33pm
post #15 of 17
Thread Starter 
All that stuff is connected between the source an the amp, right? I need something to connect between the amp and the headphones... smily_headphones1.gif
Edit: Seems like you can connect the transformers between the amp and the headphones.
Edited by UnknownAX - 3/13/13 at 11:38pm
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